-1

I want to write a function that, given two lists, will check them and return True if they contain common elements and False if they do not. This is my code:

def something_in_common_a(l1, l2):
    if l1.count(l2)>0:
        print(True)
        return True
    else: 
        print(False)
        return False

When I test the function with this

assert something_in_common_a(['a', 'b', 'c'], ['c', 'd', 'e'])
assert not something_in_common_a(['a', 'b', 'c'], ['d', 'e', 'f'])

It returns False only once. Can anyone see why it doesn't return True, which is should for the first assert.

2
  • In your function something_in_common, you are checking the entire list. The The count() method returns the number of times the specified element appears in the list.
    – Joe Ferndz
    Sep 13, 2020 at 14:46
  • Oh really! I saw another example where count was used to find one value in a list and I thought it could work the same way for two lists... Sep 13, 2020 at 14:48

3 Answers 3

1
    def something_in_common_a(l1, l2):
        for item in l2:
            if item in l1:
                print(True)
                return True
        print(False)
        return False

For your second question, maybe you can use like this:

def something_in_common_a(l1, l2):
    if type(l1) is list:
        for item in l2:
            if item in l1:
                print(True)
                return True
        print(False)
        return False
   else:
       for item in l2:
           if item == l1:
                print(True)
                return True
        print(False)
        return False

1
  • thank you for your answer it was just what I was looking for! For future use, is there a way to use the same idea but with the case if l1 was instead a value? I tried "for value:" instead of for item in l2 but that is wrong syntax. How would you write it if l1 was a value instead? Sep 13, 2020 at 15:04
1

You can turn those list into a set and check their intersection:

if set(['a', 'b', 'c']).intersection(set(['c', 'd', 'e'])):
    print("There is an item in common!")

else:
    print("Nothing in common")

You can create a lambda to alias it for improved readability:

something_in_common = lambda a, b: len(set(a).intersection(set(b))) != 0

And then:

print(something_in_common([1,2,3], [3,4,5]))
# True

print(something_in_common([1,2,3], [4,5,6]))
# False
1
  • @JoseFelipe You can fix your function implementation, Look at the second answer here
    – Or Y
    Sep 13, 2020 at 14:53
0

How about this::

>>> def something_in_common_a(l1, l2):
...     return bool(frozenset(l1) & frozenset(l2))
...

This Takes an iterable and converts it into a frozenset

>>> something_in_common_a(['a', 'b', 'c'], ['c', 'd', 'e'])
True
>>> something_in_common_a(['a', 'b', 'c'], 'cde')
True
>>> something_in_common_a('xyz', 'cde')
False

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