1

Could someone help me create a simple extension for exception? So that I can always use anywhere. I'm always using exception in all of my process.

Here's the exception that I always used:

try
{

}catch (HttpRequestException ex) { LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message); }
 catch (KeyNotFoundException ex) { LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message); }
 catch (JsonException ex) { LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message); }
 catch (InvalidDataException ex) { LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message); }
 catch (Exception ex) { LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message); }
  • 4
    This code is entirely redundant as written and only needs one catch – The General Sep 14 at 5:08
  • What do you mean? – zacky Sep 14 at 5:09
  • Could you enlightened me? because I'm not expert of handling the exception. – zacky Sep 14 at 5:11
  • 2
    The following will catch all the types of exceptions catch (Exception ex) { LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message); } the other catch blocks are not adding anything more than this line does. You are saying, on this exception do something, on another exception do the same thing, and on every other exception (including the previous ones), do the same thing. – The General Sep 14 at 5:13
  • 2
    Exception, will catch all managed exceptions, including those – The General Sep 14 at 5:19
2

In case you still have the same pattern, you can refactor and create one or more methods to encapsulate the try catch and its variances.

For example:

static public bool TryCatch(Action action)
{
  try
  {
    action();
    return true;
  }
  catch ( HttpRequestException ex ) { LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message); }
  catch ( KeyNotFoundException ex ) { LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message); }
  catch ( JsonException ex ) { LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message); }
  catch ( InvalidDataException ex ) { LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message); }
  catch ( Exception ex ) { LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message); }
  return false;
}

Usage

bool result = TryCatch(() =>
{
  //
});
if ( result )
  DoSomeThing();
else
  DoAnotherThing;

TryCatch(SomeMethod);

The bool is for convenience and can be ommited.

This limits the use because of the method signature that takes an Action as a parameter but you can create some overloads if really needed...

For example I regularly use:

static public bool TryCatch(Action action)
{
  try
  {
    action();
    return true;
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    ex.Manage(ShowExceptionMode.None);
    return false;
  }
}

static public bool TryCatchManage(Action action)
{
  try
  {
    action();
    return true;
  }
  catch ( Exception ex )
  {
    ex.Manage();
    return false;
  }
}

Where the Manage methods analyses the exception from the stack to get information like class name, method name, source code file name and line number, shows a message and logs to a roll over file.

Note: As said by @MichaelRandall, all the catch in your code can be written as

try
{
}
catch (Exception ex)
{ 
  LogsHelper.Error(ex.Message);
}

Unless you want to manage each case like exposed by @Tân.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for this. It solved my problem. – zacky Sep 15 at 8:30
2

When you use try-catch block with multiple exceptions, you just need to catch the exceptions that you know it may occur.

The last exception should be used in order to catch another exception that you may be unexpected.

try
{
    // do something with http request and get erorr...
}
catch (HttpRequestException ex)
{
    // the error relates to HttpRequest

    return "Cannot connect to server...";
}
catch (KeyNotFoundException ex)
{
    // the error relates to some key in some collection
    // that couldn't be found

    return "Key is not valid...";
}
catch (JsonException ex)
{
    // the error relates to JSON
    // while you try to parse, serialize, deserialize...

    return "Cannot parse to JSON...";
}
catch (InvalidDataException ex)
{
    // the error relates to your data stream
    // it may be invalid format

    return "Invalid data format..."
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    // other exception/error
    // DivideByZeroException
    // NullReferenceException
    // SqlException
    // ...

    return "Failed to do something..."
}

BTW, you can do something/return some data with some specific message...

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