1

In the following code, is the return value correctly created. I have some doubt as both the arguments to the pair constructor are related. Does the use of move for second argument corrupts the first argument. Or if the first argument is always created before the second argument:

class A
{
    private:
        struct B
        {
            int a;
            string b;
            int c;
        };

        struct C
        {
            double d;
            float f;
        };

        struct Key
        {
            int a;
            string b;
            double d;
        };
        
        struct Data
        {
            B x;
            C y;
        };
        
    public:
        Data data;
        
        using ReturnType = pair<Key, Data>;        
        ReturnType operator()(Source input)
        {
            // use input to fill Data
            
            return {{data.x.a, data.x.b, data.y.d}, move(this->data)};
        }    
};

Note: Source may be database cursor, standard input stream, or may be a file pointer containing relevant data.

Does c++ standard define the order in which the pair will be created. Is there any difference between c++11 and c++17 regarding this.

3
  • 1
    If you have another question, post (as in a new post) another question. Don't broaden a question you already got answers for. That invalidates answers and is disrespectful to people who take the time to answer you. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Sep 14 '20 at 7:15
  • 1
    I was just modifying the question, but you people were very fast in replying. It was not disrespectful. I am full of praise. I have already pressed the up button for your answers. – virus00x Sep 14 '20 at 7:19
  • 1
    Yes. Some questions get answered fast. That does not invalidate the point. Your edit was broadening the scope. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Sep 14 '20 at 7:21
3

From this evaluation order reference:

  1. In list-initialization, every value computation and side effect of a given initializer clause is sequenced before every value computation and side effect associated with any initializer clause that follows it in the brace-enclosed comma-separated list of initalizers.

What it is saying is that in the expression

{{data.x.a, data.x.b, data.y.d}, move(this->data)}

the {data.x.a, data.x.b, data.y.d} part will be sequenced before (i.e. evaluated before) move(this->data).

0
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n3337, The C++11 standard draft, contains this passage

[dcl.init.list]

4 Within the initializer-list of a braced-init-list, the initializer-clauses, including any that result from pack expansions ([temp.variadic]), are evaluated in the order in which they appear. That is, every value computation and side effect associated with a given initializer-clause is sequenced before every value computation and side effect associated with any initializer-clause that follows it in the comma-separated list of the initializer-list. [ Note: This evaluation ordering holds regardless of the semantics of the initialization; for example, it applies when the elements of the initializer-list are interpreted as arguments of a constructor call, even though ordinarily there are no sequencing constraints on the arguments of a call. — end note ]

So when using brace initialization, the argument to initialize the Key in the ReturnType is going to be evaluated in full before the argument for the Data.

There is similar wording in every C++ standard since.

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