1

I want to initialize array of char arrays in a function:

void myFunction(char*** words)
{
   int size = 3;
   char** words_ = (char**) malloc(size * sizeof(char*));
   for (int i=0; i< size; ++i)
   {
       // init each word words[i] with some value
   }
   *words = words_;
}

which I use in that way:

char** multiple_words;
myFunction(&multiple_words);

Is there any other way to write this code better/simpler? (This code works BTW).

1
  • char** multiple_words; is a pointer to pointer to char, not array of array of char. I think you mix up arrays and pointers (this is a common mistake). char ** also works for pointer to array of pointer to char and pointer to array of pointer to array of char, since a pointer does not know if he points to a single instance or an array (for array with a single dimension). Sep 15 '20 at 14:47
1
char** myFunction()
{
   int size = 3;
   char** words_ = (char**) malloc(size * sizeof(char*));
   for (int i=0; i< size; ++i)
   {
       // init each word words[i] with some value
   }
   return words_;
}
char **words = myFunction();
1
  • I thought about it. It looks better of course, but if I want to have multiple arguments like that in the function, this answer does not help. Sep 15 '20 at 14:02
1

You can simplify the malloc call itself a bit. You don't need to cast the result of malloc in C1, so that call could be simplified to

char** words_ = malloc(size * sizeof *words);  // sizeof *words == sizeof (char *)

Always check the result of a malloc, calloc, or realloc call. Even though the likelihood of the request failing is small, it's not zero.

The words_ variable really serves no purpose, and at first glance looked like you were redeclaring the words function argument. It would be simpler to get rid of it entirely and just write

*words = malloc( sizeof **words * size ); // sizeof **words == sizeof (char *)

leaving us with

void myFunction(char*** words)
{
   int size = 3;
   *words = malloc(size * sizeof **words);
   if ( *words )
   {
     for (int i=0; i< size; ++i)
     {
         // init each word words[i] with some value
     }
   }
}

  1. At least as of the 1989 standard - if you're using an ancient K&R-era implementation or if you're compiling this code as C++, then a cast is required. However, if you're writing C++, then you shouldn't be using malloc anyway.
0

I would create abstractions depending on what I want to represent:

struct word {
   char *letters;
};
struct sentence {
   struct word *words;
};

// and then work with those abstractions:

int sentence_create(struct sentence *s) {
    const size_t size = 3;
    s->words = malloc(size * sizeof(*s->words));
    if (s->words == NULL) goto ERR_WORDS;

    s->words[0] = strdup("hello");
    if (s->words[0] == NULL) goto ERR_0;
    s->words[1] = strdup("world");
    if (s->words[1] == NULL) goto ERR_1;
    s->words[2] = NULL;

    // success
    return 0;

    // goto error handling
    free(s->words[1]);
    ERR_1:
    free(s->words[0]);
    ERR_0:
    free(s->words);
    s->words = NULL;
    ERR_WORDS:
    return -ENOMEM;
}

int main() {
    struct sentence sentence;
    if (sentence_create(&sentence) != 0) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Oh no!");
        abort();
    }
    // TODO: sentence_destroy(&sentence) to free memory
}

Also see wiki.c2 Three Star Programmer

0

Not sure 100% whether it is easier or not:

typedef struct {
    char **words;
} WordList;

void myFunc(WordList *wordList) {
    ...
    wordList->words = malloc(numberOfWords * sizeof(char *));
    // strSource : this string comes from somewhere in your code
    ...
    for (int i = 0; i < numberOfWords; i++) {
        int numberOfChars = strlen(strSource);
        (wordList->words)[i] = malloc((numberOfChars + 1) * sizeof(char));
        (wordList->words)[i][numberOfChars] = '\0';
        ...
        strcpy((wordList->words)[i], strSource)
        ...
    }
    ...
}

int main() {
    WordList wordList;
    ...
    myFunc(&wordList);
    ...
}
0

This is gonna get icky no matter how you write it.

  • A char** is fine to use for pointing at the first item in an array of char*, each pointing at a string of individual length.
  • It is best if the function can return a char**, but if that isn't possible, then...
  • We'd have to return a char** through parameters, means we have to write char***. Three levels of indirection is always questionable, but this specific case is about the only valid use for it. Or the lesser evil at least, since...
  • Some makeshift struct wrapper that does nothing but hiding away the *** isn't making the code any better or more readable. That's very similar to hiding pointers behind typedef, not recommended.

The least messy way to write that might be something like this:

void heard (char*** word, size_t size)
{
   char** the_word = malloc( sizeof(char*[size]) );
   
   for(size_t i=0; i<size; i++)
   {
     const char* str = "bird";          // some random data from somewhere
     the_word[i] = malloc (sizeof str); // allocate room for individual strings
     strcpy(the_word[i], str);
   }

   *word = the_word;
}

Then call it as:

char** word;
heard(&word, 3);

for(size_t i=0; i<3; i++)
{
  puts(word[i]);
}  

The most proper solution is probably to use a complete string container class which handles all of this for you. Then you'd just declare arrays of strings and don't worry about all the details of allocating things manually.

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