0

Is there a way to map keys/values of one statically initialized container to other statically initializing one? Something like that:

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
using namespace std;

const set< pair< string, int > > my_set = {
    ( "three" , 3  ),
    ( "seven" , 7  ),
    ( "twelve", 12 )
};

//how to statically extract pairs' first values?
const set< string > my_strings = my_set.values().map( []( const auto & pair ){ return pair.first; } );

int main() {
    cout << "statically initialized set:" << endl;
    for ( const auto & v : my_strings )
        cout << "    " << v << endl;
}

Expecting output:

statically initialized set:
    three
    seven
    twelve
  • 2
    The thing you have to be most careful about is if the static data is inside different translation units. The current answers assume the data is ordered in the same file like your questions asks, and you would get different answers if that assumption were removed. – AndyG Sep 17 at 18:30
3

no need for special library or c++20

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
using namespace std;

const set< pair< string, int > > my_set = {
    { "three" , 3  },
    { "seven" , 7  },
    { "twelve", 12 }
};

//how to statically extract pairs' first values?
const set< string > my_strings = []{
    set<string> data;
    for(auto& pair: my_set){ // or with c++20 : ranges & use set's InputIt constructor
        data.insert(pair.first);
    }
    return data;
}();

int main() {
    cout << "statically initialized set:" << endl;
    for ( const auto & v : my_strings )
        cout << "    " << v << endl;
}

Note that std::set has no constexpr constructor, it would not do compile-time initialization.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for the answer! Is my_strings initialized statically in this case? What set<> ... = []{}(); construct means? Where can I read about it? Thanks in advance. – Slaus Sep 17 at 20:39
  • 1
    @Slaus I'm not sure what you mean by statically, yes it would initialize correctly and you cannot modify it, but since std::set has no constexpr constructor, it would not be initialized at compile time (i.e. both my_set and my_strings are constructed at runtime) – apple apple Sep 18 at 7:27
  • Thank for answering. Yes, I was wondering if initialization would happen at compile time or not. So I guess it initialized right before main() starts executing ... – Slaus Sep 18 at 7:42
  • 1
    @Slaus and the []{}(); is an instantly invoked lambda function (I didn't notice I haven't send this message :P ) – apple apple Sep 18 at 8:09
  • @appleapple more common name for this idiom is IIFE: Immediately-invoked function expression – NoSenseEtAl Sep 18 at 19:48
4

With range-v3:

const set< string > my_strings =
    my_set 
    | ranges::views::keys
    | ranges::to<std::set>();

views::keys is in C++20 but ranges::to is not.

| improve this answer | |
  • For completeness, can you point out the part of the standard that guarantees my_set being constructed before my_strings ? – Jeffrey Sep 17 at 18:07
  • 2
    @Jeffrey eel.is/c++draft/basic.start.dynamic – Barry Sep 17 at 18:14
  • @Barry this is valid only for stuff in the same TU, right? Otherwise SIOF? – NoSenseEtAl Sep 18 at 19:53
  • 1
    @NoSenseEtAl Yes, but the question is about the same TU. – Barry Sep 19 at 15:01

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