97

having a rough time working with struct fields using reflect package. in particular, have not figured out how to set the field value.

type t struct { fi int; fs string }
var r t = t{ 123, "jblow" }
var i64 int64 = 456
  1. getting Name of field i - this seems to work

    var field = reflect.TypeOf(r).Field(i).Name

  2. getting value of field i as a) interface{}, b) int - this seems to work

    var iface interface{} = reflect.ValueOf(r).Field(i).Interface()

    var i int = int(reflect.ValueOf(r).Field(i).Int())

  3. setting value of field i - try one - panic

    reflect.ValueOf(r).Field(i).SetInt( i64 )

    panic: reflect.Value·SetInt using value obtained using unexported field

    assuming it did not like field names "id" and "name", so renamed to "Id" and "Name"

    a) is this assumption correct?

    b) if correct, thought not necessary since in same file / package

  4. setting value of field i - try two (with field names capitalized ) - panic

    reflect.ValueOf(r).Field(i).SetInt( 465 )

    reflect.ValueOf(r).Field(i).SetInt( i64 )

    panic: reflect.Value·SetInt using unaddressable value


Instructions below by @peterSO are thorough and high quality

Four. this works:

reflect.ValueOf(&r).Elem().Field(i).SetInt( i64 )

he documents as well that the field names must be exportable (begin with capital letter)

147

Go is available as open source code. A good way to learn about reflection is to see how the core Go developers use it. For example, the Go fmt and json packages. The package documentation has links to the source code files under the heading Package files.

The Go json package marshals and unmarshals JSON from and to Go structures.


Here's a step-by-step example which sets the value of a struct field while carefully avoiding errors.

The Go reflect package has a CanAddr function.

func (v Value) CanAddr() bool

CanAddr returns true if the value's address can be obtained with Addr. Such values are called addressable. A value is addressable if it is an element of a slice, an element of an addressable array, a field of an addressable struct, or the result of dereferencing a pointer. If CanAddr returns false, calling Addr will panic.

The Go reflect package has a CanSet function, which, if true, implies that CanAddr is also true.

func (v Value) CanSet() bool

CanSet returns true if the value of v can be changed. A Value can be changed only if it is addressable and was not obtained by the use of unexported struct fields. If CanSet returns false, calling Set or any type-specific setter (e.g., SetBool, SetInt64) will panic.

We need to make sure we can Set the struct field. For example,

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
)

func main() {
    type t struct {
        N int
    }
    var n = t{42}
    // N at start
    fmt.Println(n.N)
    // pointer to struct - addressable
    ps := reflect.ValueOf(&n)
    // struct
    s := ps.Elem()
    if s.Kind() == reflect.Struct {
        // exported field
        f := s.FieldByName("N")
        if f.IsValid() {
            // A Value can be changed only if it is 
            // addressable and was not obtained by 
            // the use of unexported struct fields.
            if f.CanSet() {
                // change value of N
                if f.Kind() == reflect.Int {
                    x := int64(7)
                    if !f.OverflowInt(x) {
                        f.SetInt(x)
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    // N at end
    fmt.Println(n.N)
}

Output:
42
7

If we can be certain that all the error checks are unnecessary, the example simplifies to,

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
)

func main() {
    type t struct {
        N int
    }
    var n = t{42}
    fmt.Println(n.N)
    reflect.ValueOf(&n).Elem().FieldByName("N").SetInt(7)
    fmt.Println(n.N)
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • 4
    Give Up! somewhere in there is an answer, but four hours of work on the json pkg have not yielded it to me. re the reflect pkg, pulling info is pretty straightforward, but setting data requires some of black magic for which I would love to see a simple example somewhere! – cc young Jun 19 '11 at 10:57
  • 2
    Outstanding! if you're ever in Thailand please let me treat you to a beer or two or three! thank you very much – cc young Jun 20 '11 at 7:01
  • 5
    Great practical example, this article completely demystified it for me golang.org/doc/articles/laws_of_reflection.html – danmux May 15 '13 at 11:11
  • Awesome example.Here is playground sample of the same code play.golang.org/p/RK8jR_9rPh – Sarath Sadasivan Pillai Jul 21 '15 at 13:39
  • This doesn't set a struct field. This sets a field in a pointer to struct. Obviously, this is not answering the question OP asked. – wvxvw Mar 6 '17 at 13:53
12

This seems to work:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
)

type Foo struct {
    Number int
    Text string
}

func main() {
    foo := Foo{123, "Hello"}

    fmt.Println(int(reflect.ValueOf(foo).Field(0).Int()))

    reflect.ValueOf(&foo).Elem().Field(0).SetInt(321)

    fmt.Println(int(reflect.ValueOf(foo).Field(0).Int()))
}

Prints:

123
321
|improve this answer|||||
  • thanks! now that I've read peterSO's notes, this makes perfect sense. I was using foo, not &foo, so could not be changed, and was unsure what Elem() was about. – cc young Jun 20 '11 at 6:56

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