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I have code that looks like this, where I'm listening to a channel up until a timeout interval. Let's say this goroutine 1

select {
    case <-time.After(TimeoutInterval):
        mu.Lock()
        defer mu.Unlock()
        delete(msgChMap, index)
        return ""
    case msg := <-msgCh:
        return msg
}

Elsewhere, I have a goroutine 2 that runs something like this where it grabs the appropriate msgCh from a Map, deletes the entry in the map and then sends a message through the channel.

mu.Lock()
msgCh, ok := msgChMap[index]
delete(msgChMap, index)
mu.Unlock()
if ok {
    msgCh <- "yay"
}

It seems like it is possible for me to grab the message channel msgCh from the Map, try to send a message but because TimeoutInterval has already passed, there will be nothing listening to the channel, and my code will get stuck waiting for a listener. If I put the lock after sending yay to the msgCh, it seems possible that I could deadlock as 2 will be waiting for a listener to the channel and is not releasing the lock, but 1 is no longer listening but requires the lock.

What is a general pattern to avoid getting stuck waiting for a listener? Perhaps go is smart enough to not get stuck here.

2 Answers 2

1

You can prevent getting stuck when waiting for a listener by using select for the sender.

By using select you can use more case for sender in this situation

mu.Lock()
msgCh, ok := msgChMap[index]
delete(msgChMap, index)
mu.Unlock()
if ok {
    select {
    // listener is available
    case msgCh <- "yay":
        fmt.Println("sent")

    // if not avalable (execute immediately)
    default:
        fmt.Println("no available listener")
        // ...just ignore or do something else
    }
}

Or waiting for a short time

mu.Lock()
msgCh, ok := msgChMap[index]
delete(msgChMap, index)
mu.Unlock()
if ok {
    select {
    // listener is available
    case msgCh <- "yay":
        fmt.Println("sent")

    // if not available, waiting for listener
    case <-time.After(30 * time.Second):
        fmt.Println("after 30 seconds, still no available listener")
        // ...just ignore or do something else
    }
}
1

The problem here is that the channel reader my stop without the writer knowing it. It should be possible to structure this solution so that this situation never happens, but ignoring that for now, for this specific problem what you need is atomic access to the channel itself, along with a flag for channel status:

type channel struct {
   sync.Mutex

   msgCh chan Msg
   active bool
}

Writing to the channel is now done by locking it:

ch.Lock()
if ch.active {
   ch.msgCh<-data
}
ch.Unlock()

And when you "inactivate" the channel, reset the flag:

    case <-time.After(TimeoutInterval):
        mu.Lock()
        defer mu.Unlock()
        ch.Lock()
        defer ch.Unlock()
        delete(msgChMap, index)
        ch.active=false
        return ""

And of course, with this now you have to keep a *channel in your map.

5
  • What kind of ways to structure a solution so that situation never happens are there?
    – Ringil
    Sep 18, 2020 at 22:36
  • 1
    Difficult to come up with one by looking at the solution. What is the higher level problem you're trying to solve? Sep 18, 2020 at 22:43
  • 1 is a server api request handler. It needs to send a message to a different server, which responds by sending message through a channel. Messages through that channel are shared throughout my server so I need a way to send it to the correct request handler, which is why I have a msgChMap. I'm waiting for the response from the other server in 2. If the response comes, I send it to the correct handler unless it does not come in a reasonable amount of time. In that case, I would like to return a dummy value and discard the value.
    – Ringil
    Sep 19, 2020 at 11:49
  • "Messages through that channel are shared throughout my server": this sounds like the source of your problem. Why not create one channel/goroutine per request/response? Sep 19, 2020 at 16:14
  • That makes sense. Unfortunately, it's a constraint I have to deal with. I guess avoiding that would probably be a good way to restructure the solution and avoid this problem. Thanks for the advice!
    – Ringil
    Sep 20, 2020 at 0:18

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