4

I'm having difficult time figuring out query in gremlin for the following scenario. Here is the the directed graph (may be cyclic).

enter image description here

I want to get top N favorable nodes, starting from node "Jane", where favor is defined as:

favor(Jane->Lisa) = edge(Jane,Lisa) / total weight from outwards edges of Lisa
favor(Jane->Thomas) = favor(Jane->Thomas) + favor(Jane->Lisa) * favor(Lisa->Thomas)

favor(Jane->Jerryd) = favor(Jane->Thomas) * favor(Thomas->Jerryd) + favor(Jane->Lisa) * favor(Lisa->Jerryd)

favor(Jane->Jerryd) = [favor(Jane->Thomas) + favor(Jane->Lisa) * favor(Lisa->Thomas)] * favor(Thomas->Jerryd) + favor(Jane->Lisa) * favor(Lisa->Jerryd)


and so .. on

Here is same graph with hand calculation of what I mean,

enter image description here

This is fairly simple to transferse with programming but I'm not sure, how ecactly to query it with gremlin or even sparql.

Here is the query to create this example graph:

g
.addV('person').as('1').property(single, 'name', 'jane')
.addV('person').as('2').property(single, 'name', 'thomas')
.addV('person').as('3').property(single, 'name', 'lisa')
.addV('person').as('4').property(single, 'name', 'wyd')
.addV('person').as('5').property(single, 'name', 'jerryd')
.addE('favor').from('1').to('2').property('weight', 10)
.addE('favor').from('1').to('3').property('weight', 20)
.addE('favor').from('3').to('2').property('weight', 90)
.addE('favor').from('2').to('4').property('weight', 50)
.addE('favor').from('2').to('5').property('weight', 90)
.addE('favor').from('3').to('5').property('weight', 100)

All I'm looking for is:

[Lisa, computedFavor]
[Thomas, computedFavor]
[Jerryd, computedFavor]
[Wyd, computedFavor]

I'm struggling to incooperate cyclic graph to adjust weight. This is where I've been able to query so far: https://gremlify.com/f2r0zy03oxc/2

g.V().has('name','jane').       // our starting node
   repeat(                      
      union(                    
         outE()                 // get only outwards edges
      ).
      otherV().simplePath()).   // produce simple path
   emit().  
   times(10).                   // max depth of 10
   path().                      // attain path
   by(valueMap())

Addressing Comments from stephen mallette:

favor(Jane->Jerryd) = 
    favor(Jane->Thomas) * favor(Thomas->Jerryd) 
  + favor(Jane->Lisa) * favor(Lisa->Jerryd)

// note we can expand on favor(Jane->Thomas) in above expression
// 
// favor(Jane->Thomas) is favor(Jane->Thomas)@directEdge +
//                        favor(Jane->Lisa) * favor(Lisa->Thomas)
//

Calculation Example

Jane to Lisa                   => 20/(10+20)         => 2/3
Lisa to Jerryd                 => 100/(100+90)       => 10/19
Jane to Lisa to Jerryd         => 2/3*(10/19)

Jane to Thomas (directly)      => 10/(10+20)         => 1/3
Jane to Lisa to Thomas         => 2/3 * 90/(100+90)  => 2/3 * 9/19
Jane to Thomas                 => 1/3 + (2/3 * 9/19)

Thomas to Jerryd               => 90/(90+50)         => 9/14
Jane to Thomas to Jerryd       => [1/3 + (2/3 * 9/19)] * (9/14)

Jane to Jerryd:
= Jane to Lisa to Jerryd + Jane to Thomas to Jerryd
= 2/3 * (10/19) + [1/3 + (2/3 * 9/19)] * (9/14)

Here is somewhat of psedocode:

def get_favors(graph, label="jane", starting_favor=1):
  start = graph.findNode(label)
  queue = [(start, starting_favor)]
  favors = {}
  seen = set()
  
  while queue:
    node, curr_favor = queue.popleft()

    # get total weight (out edges) from this node
    total_favor = 0
    for (edgeW, outNode) in node.out_edges:
       total_favor = total_favor + edgeW

    for (edgeW, outNode) in node.out_edges:
    
       # if there are no favors for this node
       # take current favor and provide proportional favor
       if outNode not in favors:
          favors[outNode] = curr_favor * (edgeW / total_favor)

       # it already has some favor, so we add to it
       # we add proportional favor
       else:
          favors[outNode] += curr_favor * (edgeW / total_favor)

       # if we have seen this edge, and node ignore
       # otherwise, transverse
    
       if (edgeW, outNode) not in seen:
          seen.add((edgeW, outNode))
          queue.append((outNode, favors[outNode]))

   # sort favor by value and return top X
   return favors

2
  • just to be clear, could you please update the question to specify how to calculate favor(Jane->JerryD)? I just want to make sure i understand the calculation fully. it might also help if you updated your gremlin sample data to exactly match you picture. Sep 22 '20 at 19:29
  • @stephenmallette I've added Jane->Jerryd calculation. Also added pseduocode in python. Gremlin data matches picture now. In gremlin data (vertex are person with label of name, and edges are favor with weights). Let me know if there is more I can clarify.
    – Some name
    Sep 23 '20 at 2:32
2

Here is a Gremlin query that I believe applies your formula correctly. I'll paste the full final query first then say a few words about the steps involved.

gremlin> g.withSack(1).V().
......1>    has('name','jane').
......2>    repeat(outE().
......3>           sack(mult).
......4>             by(project('w','f').
......5>               by('weight').
......6>               by(outV().outE().values('weight').sum()).
......7>               math('w / f')).
......8>           inV().
......9>           simplePath()).
.....10>    until(has('name','jerryd')).
.....11>    sack().
.....12>    sum()     

==>0.768170426065163         

The query starts with Jane and keeps traversing until all paths to Jerry D have been inspected. Along the way for each traverser a sack is maintained containing the calculated weight values for each relationship multiplied together. The calculation on line 6 finds all the edge weight values possible coming from the prior vertex and the math step on line 7 is used to divide the weight on the current edge by that sum. At the very end each of the computed results is added together on line 12. If you remove the final sum step you can see the intermediate results.

gremlin> g.withSack(1).V().
......1>    has('name','jane').
......2>    repeat(outE().
......3>           sack(mult).
......4>             by(project('w','f').
......5>               by('weight').
......6>               by(outV().outE().values('weight').sum()).
......7>               math('w / f')).
......8>           inV().
......9>           simplePath()).
.....10>    until(has('name','jerryd')).
.....11>    sack()

==>0.2142857142857143
==>0.3508771929824561
==>0.2030075187969925   

To see the routes taken a path step can be added to the query.

gremlin> g.withSack(1).V().
......1>    has('name','jane').
......2>    repeat(outE().
......3>           sack(mult).
......4>             by(project('w','f').
......5>               by('weight').
......6>               by(outV().outE().values('weight').sum()).
......7>               math('w / f')).
......8>           inV().
......9>           simplePath()).
.....10>    until(has('name','jerryd')).
.....11>    local(
.....12>      union(
.....13>        path().
.....14>          by('name').
.....15>          by('weight'),
.....16>        sack()).fold()) 

==>[[jane,10,thomas,90,jerryd],0.2142857142857143]
==>[[jane,20,lisa,100,jerryd],0.3508771929824561]
==>[[jane,20,lisa,90,thomas,90,jerryd],0.2030075187969925]   

This approach also takes account of adding in any direct connections, per your formula as we can see if we use Thomas as the target.

gremlin>  g.withSack(1).V().
......1>    has('name','jane').
......2>    repeat(outE().
......3>           sack(mult).
......4>             by(project('w','f').
......5>               by('weight').
......6>               by(outV().outE().values('weight').sum()).
......7>               math('w / f')).
......8>           inV().
......9>           simplePath()).
.....10>    until(has('name','thomas')).
.....11>    local(
.....12>      union(
.....13>        path().
.....14>          by('name').
.....15>          by('weight'),
.....16>        sack()).fold())    

==>[[jane,10,thomas],0.3333333333333333]
==>[[jane,20,lisa,90,thomas],0.3157894736842105]  

These extra steps are not needed but having the path included is useful when debugging queries like this. Also, and this is not necessary but perhaps just for general interest, I will add that you can also get to the final answer from here but the very first query I included is all you really need.

g.withSack(1).V().
   has('name','jane').
   repeat(outE().
          sack(mult).
            by(project('w','f').
              by('weight').
              by(outV().outE().values('weight').sum()).
              math('w / f')).
          inV().
          simplePath()).
   until(has('name','thomas')).
   local(
     union(
       path().
         by('name').
         by('weight'),
       sack()).fold().tail(local)).  
    sum() 
  
==>0.6491228070175439  

If any of this is unclear or I have mis-understood the formula, please let me know.

EDITED to add

To find the results for all people reachable from Jane I had to modify the query a little bit. The unfold at the end is just to make the results easier to read.

gremlin> g.withSack(1).V().
......1>    has('name','jane').
......2>    repeat(outE().
......3>           sack(mult).
......4>             by(project('w','f').
......5>               by('weight').
......6>               by(outV().outE().values('weight').sum()).
......7>               math('w / f')).
......8>           inV().
......9>           simplePath()).
.....10>    emit().
.....11>    local(
.....12>      union(
.....13>        path().
.....14>          by('name').
.....15>          by('weight').unfold(),
.....16>        sack()).fold()).
.....17>        group().
.....18>          by(tail(local,2).limit(local,1)).
.....19>          by(tail(local).sum()).
.....20>        unfold()

==>jerryd=0.768170426065163
==>wyd=0.23182957393483708
==>lisa=0.6666666666666666
==>thomas=0.6491228070175439    

The final group step on line 17 uses the path results to calculate the total favor for each unique name found. To see the paths you can run the query with the group step removed.

gremlin> g.withSack(1).V().
......1>    has('name','jane').
......2>    repeat(outE().
......3>           sack(mult).
......4>             by(project('w','f').
......5>               by('weight').
......6>               by(outV().outE().values('weight').sum()).
......7>               math('w / f')).
......8>           inV().
......9>           simplePath()).
.....10>    emit().
.....11>    local(
.....12>      union(
.....13>        path().
.....14>          by('name').
.....15>          by('weight').unfold(),
.....16>        sack()).fold())

==>[jane,10,thomas,0.3333333333333333]
==>[jane,20,lisa,0.6666666666666666]
==>[jane,10,thomas,50,wyd,0.11904761904761904]
==>[jane,10,thomas,90,jerryd,0.2142857142857143]
==>[jane,20,lisa,90,thomas,0.3157894736842105]
==>[jane,20,lisa,100,jerryd,0.3508771929824561]
==>[jane,20,lisa,90,thomas,50,wyd,0.11278195488721804]
==>[jane,20,lisa,90,thomas,90,jerryd,0.2030075187969925]    
3
  • hi @kelvin-lawrence, thanks for the answer. The calculation looks correct! But, is there a way to calculate favor each unique node from Jane? In your answer, right now - we are transversing until Jerryd. How do I go about, getting list of unique nodes sorted by favor, which are reachable from Jane? e.g. => jerryd(favorScore), lisa(favorScore), thomas(favorScore), Wyd(favorScore). In this, limiting transversal to depth of X is Ok until indefinitely transversing.
    – Some name
    Sep 25 '20 at 0:43
  • Also, I wanna pass my thanks for making the book publicly available - it has helped me a lot :)
    – Some name
    Sep 25 '20 at 0:44
  • I updated the answer to show the results for all the people. Sep 25 '20 at 2:32
1

This answer is quite elegant and best for the environment involved with Neptune and Python. I offer a second for reference, in case others come across this question. From the moment I saw this question I could only ever picture it as being solved with a VertexProgram in OLAP fashion with a GraphComputer. As a result, I had a hard time thinking of it any other way. Of course, use of a VertexProgram requires a JVM language like Java and will not work directly with Neptune. I suppose my closest workaround would have been to use Java, grab a subgraph() from Neptune and then run the custom VertexProgram in TinkerGraph locally which would be quite speedy to do.

More generally, without the Python/Neptune requirements, converting an algorithm to a VertexProgram is not a bad approach depending on the nature of the graph and the amount of data that needs to be traversed. As there isn't a lot of content out there on this topic I thought I'd offer the core of the code for it here. This is the guts of it:

        @Override
        public void execute(final Vertex vertex, final Messenger<Double> messenger, final Memory memory) {
            // on the first pass calculate the "total favor" for all vertices
            // and pass the calculated current favor forward along incident edges
            // only for the "start vertex" 
            if (memory.isInitialIteration()) {
                copyHaltedTraversersFromMemory(vertex);

                final boolean startVertex = vertex.value("name").equals(nameOfStartVertrex);
                final double initialFavor = startVertex ? 1d : 0d;
                vertex.property(VertexProperty.Cardinality.single, FAVOR, initialFavor);
                vertex.property(VertexProperty.Cardinality.single, TOTAL_FAVOR,
                        IteratorUtils.stream(vertex.edges(Direction.OUT)).mapToDouble(e -> e.value("weight")).sum());

                if (startVertex) {
                    final Iterator<Edge> incidents = vertex.edges(Direction.OUT);
                    memory.add(VOTE_TO_HALT, !incidents.hasNext());
                    while (incidents.hasNext()) {
                        final Edge incident = incidents.next();
                        messenger.sendMessage(MessageScope.Global.of(incident.inVertex()),
                                (double) incident.value("weight") /  (double) vertex.value(TOTAL_FAVOR));
                    }
                }
            } else {
                // on future passes, sum all the incoming "favor" and add it to
                // the "favor" property of each vertex. then once again pass the
                // current favor to incident edges. this will keep happening 
                // until the message passing stops.
                final Iterator<Double> messages = messenger.receiveMessages();
                final boolean hasMessages = messages.hasNext();
                if (hasMessages) {
                    double adjacentFavor = IteratorUtils.reduce(messages, 0.0d, Double::sum);
                    vertex.property(VertexProperty.Cardinality.single, FAVOR, (double) vertex.value(FAVOR) + adjacentFavor);

                    final Iterator<Edge> incidents = vertex.edges(Direction.OUT);
                    memory.add(VOTE_TO_HALT, !incidents.hasNext());
                    while (incidents.hasNext()) {
                        final Edge incident = incidents.next();
                        messenger.sendMessage(MessageScope.Global.of(incident.inVertex()),
                                adjacentFavor * ((double) incident.value("weight") / (double) vertex.value(TOTAL_FAVOR)));
                    }
                }
            }
        }

The above is then executed as:

ComputerResult result = graph.compute().program(FavorVertexProgram.build().name("jane").create()).submit().get();
GraphTraversalSource rg = result.graph().traversal();
Traversal elements = rg.V().elementMap();

and that "elements" traversal yields:

{id=0, label=person, ^favor=1.0, name=jane, ^totalFavor=30.0}
{id=2, label=person, ^favor=0.6491228070175439, name=thomas, ^totalFavor=140.0}
{id=4, label=person, ^favor=0.6666666666666666, name=lisa, ^totalFavor=190.0}
{id=6, label=person, ^favor=0.23182957393483708, name=wyd, ^totalFavor=0.0}
{id=8, label=person, ^favor=0.768170426065163, name=jerryd, ^totalFavor=0.0}
1

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