-1

So, for data structures here is a piece of code we are supposed to find the runtime for:

public static int calc( List<Integer> lst )
      {

         int count = 0;
         int N = lst.size();

         for ( int i=0; i<N; i++)
         {
            if (lst.get(i) > 0)
               sum += lst.get(i);
            else
               sum += lst.get(i) * lst.get(i);
         }
         return sum;
      } 

We are supposed to answer what the runtime would be if lst is a LinkedList vs an ArrayList. So for an array it is pretty easy, just O(N) because it loops through the list checking every element, and lst.get(i) is a constant time operation since it is an array. The tricky part is over a linked list. From what I'm seeing, every time lst.get(i) would be called on a linked list, it would have to start at the head of the list and traverse to index i. And from this code it looks like it would call get either 3 times or 2 times depending on the result of the if statement, so I would think it would be O(N^4) / O(N^3) runtime. However, according to a grad student, it is O(N^2) time. Just wondering if someone can explain what the correct answer is and why.

I ran some test code on java and got this as my time result: list 1 is elements 0 - 99 of size 100. And list 2 is elements 0 - 9999, of size 10,000 List one finished in 2868 ms, list two finished in 99443 ms.

3
  • 2
    get(i) is O(n), Worst case is that code calls get(i) 3 times in the loop, so with the loop, worst case is O(n * 3 * n), which is O(n * n), which is O(n²). --- Note that calling get(i) 3 times doesn't mean n * n * n, it means n + n + n, aka 3 * n.
    – Andreas
    Sep 20 '20 at 0:43
  • 1
    There are at worst 3 get operations for every loop iteration. For LinkedList, a get operation is O(N) because you have to walk the list. As such, there 3 * O(N) operations, N times. Hence, O(N^2). Sep 20 '20 at 0:44
  • Ohhh oh my gosh thank you guys so much. I was getting the O(N^3) mixed up with a simple 3*O(N). Thank you guys! Sep 20 '20 at 0:46
2

There are at worst 3 get operations for every loop iteration. For LinkedList, a get operation is O(N) because you have to walk the list. As such, there at worst 3 * O(N) operations, at worst N times. Hence, O(N^2).

However, it can be made as efficient for LinkedList as ArrayList - and simpler - by using an enhanced for loop:

for (int e : lst) {
  if (e > 0)
    sum += e;
  else
    sum += e * e;
}

This internally uses an Iterator, which isn't O(N) to look up each element for LinkedList, because it keeps track of where it is: getting the next element from the Iterator is just O(1).

1
  • Thank you so much! I appreciate the clarification. Sep 20 '20 at 0:50

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