1

I thought I had a good regex line below that works with tests I did in Regexbuddy, but doesn't seem to work in bash.

I need someone with much better knowledge of regex than me to help me out. ;)

The point is to do a basic test as to whether a string contains a remote host for rsync. So we're testing for something valid like username@host:/ or username@host:~/ (and I also assume ./ ?) ...

#!/bin/bash

test="foo@bar:/here/path/"
regex='^([\w-_.]*)@([\w-_.:]*):[~./]'

if [[ "${test}" =~ "${regex}" ]]; then 
    echo "yes, remote host" 
else 
    echo "no, local"
fi

# filter for remote host by regex
# ^ begin at start of line, ( [ match underscore, word & number chars, dashes, fullstops ] in * repetition ) until first @ and then ( [ match underscore, word & number chars, dashes, fullstops, and colons] in * repetition ) until : and then at least [ ~ or . or / )
# so someone@host-whatever-123.com:/path/ will match
# someone_here123@192.168.0.1:~/path/ will match
# blah123.user@2001:db8:85a3:8d3:1319:8a2e:370:7348:./path/ will match
# user@wherever:path/ will not, and /anything@starting.com:with/a/slash will not match
# etc

Any ideas?

3
  • 2
    Do not quote the regex, if [[ "$test" =~ $regex ]]; then . And declare the pattern as regex='^([[:alnum:]_.-]*)@([[:alnum:]_.:-]*):[~./]' – Wiktor Stribiżew Sep 21 '20 at 7:51
  • 2
    Please parse your script with shellcheck.net. This will imediatly give you the error: SC2076: Don't quote right-hand side of =~, it'll match literally rather than as a regex. – kvantour Sep 21 '20 at 7:54
  • Is there some good documentation on bash regex anyone can point me to, while we're at it? – nooblag Sep 21 '20 at 7:56
3

There are several issues:

  • The $regex variable should not be quoted after =~, or non-regex string matching gets enabled
  • \w should not be used, use [:alnum:] POSIX character class instead, that matches letters and digits
  • - in bracket expressions should be the first or last character to be correctly parsed as a hyphen.

I'd also use + (1 or more) quantifier instead of * in the pattern to enforce at least one char before and after @.

You can use

test="foo@bar:/here/path/"
regex='^([[:alnum:]_.-]+)@([[:alnum:]_.:-]+):[~./]'
if [[ "$test" =~ $regex ]]; then 
    echo "yes, remote host" 
else 
    echo "no, local"
fi

See Bash demo.

1

Bash doesn't support character classes like \w, have a look here https://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/x17129.html section POSIX Character Classes

In your case try replacing \w with [:alnum:] and you have to remove the quotes on the right side of =~.

I modified it a bit but this works for me:

[[ "foo@bar:/here/path/" =~ ^[-_\.[:alnum:]]+@[-_\.[:alnum:]]+:[~./] ]] && \
    echo "Remote" || \
    echo "Local"

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.