29

This example shows an elegant way to deal with messages of different types in Rust. It has 4 variants and some variants have sub members that are only accessible if the enum is of that specific type. A similar pattern is also possible in TypeScript.

enum Message {
    Quit,
    Move { x: i32, y: i32 },
    Write(String),
    ChangeColor(i32, i32, i32),
}

In C++ this would most likely compare to the following code.

struct Message
{
    enum MessageType {QUIT, MOVE, WRITE, CHANGECOLOR} type;
    union MessageContent
    {
        struct Move { int x; int y;} move;
        std::string write;
        std::tuple<int, int, int> changeColor;
    } content;
};

However, this way isn't typesafe and memory management is going to become messy (e.g. making sure that string gets released if Message gets destructed if MessageType is WRITE). What is the best way to do this in modern C++?

2
  • 2
    I'm not sure C++ has a direct analog to that here, as the Rust version is significantly more capable than C++ is without serious hacking around.
    – tadman
    Sep 22, 2020 at 21:36
  • Could you make a template class with varargs and somehow crush that into a structure that...works?
    – tadman
    Sep 22, 2020 at 21:37

2 Answers 2

50

This is what std::variant is for.

(Though note, since C++ does not have pattern matching, using variants is still rather cumbersome compared to languages like Rust.)

Using std::variant, your example would look like this:

struct Quit {};
struct Move { int32_t x; int32_t y; };
struct Write { std::string s; };
struct ChangeColor { int32_t r; int32_t g; int32_t b; };
using Message = std::variant<Quit, Move, Write, ChangeColor>;

The closest thing to Rust's match expressions is std::visit. Visiting this example variant could look like:

// Utility to allow overloading lambdas for use in std::visit
template<class... Ts>
struct overload : Ts... {
    using Ts::operator()...;
};
template<class... Ts>
overload(Ts...) -> overload<Ts...>;

int main() {
    auto visitor = overload{
        [](const Quit& q)        { std::cout << "Quit\n"; },
        [](const Move& m)        { std::cout << "Move " << m.x << " " << m.y << "\n"; },
        [](const Write& w)       { std::cout << "Write " << w.s << "\n"; },
        [](const ChangeColor& c) { std::cout << "ChangeColor " << c.r << " " << c.g << " " << c.b << "\n"; }
    };

    Message m1{Quit{}};
    Message m2{Move{1, 2}};
    Message m3{Write{"a"}};
    Message m4{ChangeColor{1, 2, 3}};
    std::visit(visitor, m1);
    std::visit(visitor, m2);
    std::visit(visitor, m3);
    std::visit(visitor, m4);
}
// This prints:
//   Quit
//   Move 1 2
//   Write a
//   ChangeColor 1 2 3
5
5

Inspired by the answer of 0x5453, I wrote a snippet to help the rust-style handling of std::variant:

// https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/variant/visit
template<class... Ts> struct overloaded : Ts... { using Ts::operator()...; };
// explicit deduction guide (not needed as of C++20)
template<class... Ts> overloaded(Ts...) -> overloaded<Ts...>;

template <typename Val, typename... Ts>
auto match(Val val, Ts... ts) {
    return std::visit(overloaded{ts...}, val);
}

Usage:

match(value, [](Type1& type1) {
        ;
    },
    [](Type2& type2) {
        ;
    },
    ...
    [](TypeN& typeN) {
        ;
    }
);

Example:

#include <iostream>
#include <variant>
#include <string>

template<class... Ts> struct overloaded : Ts... { using Ts::operator()...; };
// explicit deduction guide (not needed as of C++20)
template<class... Ts> overloaded(Ts...) -> overloaded<Ts...>;

template <typename Val, typename... Ts>
auto match(Val val, Ts... ts) {
    return std::visit(overloaded{ts...}, val);
}

class A {
public:
    A() : v_(0) {}
    A(int v) : v_(v) {
        std::cout << "Initializing " << V() << std::endl;
    }
    A(const A& a) : v_(a.v_) {
        std::cout << "Copying " << V() << std::endl; }
    A(A&& a) : v_(a.v_) {
        std::cout << "Moving " << V() << std::endl;
        a.Drop();
    }
    // Explicitly delete it just in case.
    A& operator=(const A&) = delete;
    A& operator=(A&& a) {
        v_ = a.v_;
        a.Drop();
        std::cout << "Move assigning " << V() << std::endl;
        return *this;
    }
    ~A() {
        if (V()) {
            std::cout << "Deconstructing " << V() << std::endl;
        }
    }
    int V() { return v_; }
private:
    void Drop() {
        v_ = 0;
    }
    int v_;
};
auto func(bool choice) -> std::variant<A, int> {
    if (choice) {
        // Initializing 1
        return A(1);
        // Moving 1
    } else {
        return 233;
    }
};
auto main() -> int {
    A a;
    std::cout << match(func(true),
        [&](A& ret) -> std::string {
            // Move assigning 1
            a = std::move(ret);
            return "A";
        },
        [&](int ret) -> std::string {
            a = A(ret);
            return "int";
        }
    ) << std::endl; // A
    // 1
    std::cout << a.V() << std::endl;

    return 0;
    // Deconstructing 1
}

Output:

Initializing 1
Moving 1
Move assigning 1
A
1
Deconstructing 1

References:

https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/variant/visit

https://polomack.eu/std-variant/

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