91

Basically I have the inverse of this problem: Python Time Seconds to h:m:s

I have a string in the format H:MM:SS (always 2 digits for minutes and seconds), and I need the integer number of seconds that it represents. How can I do this in python?

For example:

  • "1:23:45" would produce an output of 5025
  • "0:04:15" would produce an output of 255
  • "0:00:25" would produce an output of 25

etc

1

15 Answers 15

137
def get_sec(time_str):
    """Get seconds from time."""
    h, m, s = time_str.split(':')
    return int(h) * 3600 + int(m) * 60 + int(s)


print(get_sec('1:23:45'))
print(get_sec('0:04:15'))
print(get_sec('0:00:25'))
1
  • 1
    It's very nice and clear and compact but fails if the time does not have all the components, e.g. '3' or "1:21", or if the seconds part is a float. For these cases maybe the tzot solution below could be better fit, using float values Feb 19, 2023 at 14:57
68
ts = '1:23:45'
secs = sum(int(x) * 60 ** i for i, x in enumerate(reversed(ts.split(':'))))
print(secs)
5
  • 1
    That's a really interesting technique. Thanks for sharing this.
    – hughes
    Jun 19, 2011 at 14:24
  • What does that double-star operator do?
    – hughes
    Mar 11, 2014 at 3:05
  • @hughes Exponentiation.
    – FMc
    Mar 11, 2014 at 3:23
  • 4
    This superior code will also handle s and m:s strings like "53" and "2:41" correctly
    – qubodup
    Sep 20, 2016 at 10:32
  • 2
    This is great. Change int(x) to float(x) and it'll handle decimal seconds, plus it doesn't need a leading zero for hour. VTT timestamps omit the leading 0 hour until hour > 1.
    – Marcos
    Sep 28, 2022 at 0:31
16

Using datetime module

import datetime
t = '10:15:30'
h,m,s = t.split(':')
print(int(datetime.timedelta(hours=int(h),minutes=int(m),seconds=int(s)).total_seconds()))

Output: 36930

3
  • 1
    What does the output from your code look like given the OP's example input?
    – rbatt
    May 14, 2014 at 23:21
  • You don't need re for this. Strings have a split method: str.split(). Much cleaner to just use t.split(':') instead of re.split(':', t). Oct 18, 2018 at 1:52
  • I ended up using this solution, as it seemed to be the most standard way of doing it. I slightly altered the conversion of h,m,s to int using a comprehension list to make the conversion line cleaner, which ends up looking like this: h, m, s = [int(x) for x in t.split(':')].
    – Prevok
    Feb 19, 2021 at 22:39
13

Without many checks, and assuming it's either "SS" or "MM:SS" or "HH:MM:SS" (although not necessarily two digits per part):

def to_seconds(timestr):
    seconds= 0
    for part in timestr.split(':'):
        seconds= seconds*60 + int(part, 10)
    return seconds

>>> to_seconds('09')
9
>>> to_seconds('2:09')
129
>>> to_seconds('1:02:09')
3729

This is a different “spelling” of FMc's answer :)

2
  • Really useful. Thanks. I like that you take into account for shorter strings that only contain seconds or minutes... 👍
    – petezurich
    Sep 20, 2020 at 11:27
  • 2
    This is the best solution here. How come it's so under-voted!? It considers strings with missing minutes or hours part in a neat, single function, and without using any extra library. Kudos!
    – shivams
    May 22, 2021 at 15:51
6

Using datetime module is also posible and more robust

import datetime as dt

def get_total_seconds(stringHMS):
   timedeltaObj = dt.datetime.strptime(stringHMS, "%H:%M:%S") - dt.datetime(1900,1,1)
   return timedeltaObj.total_seconds()

datetime.strptime parses the string according to format %H:%M:%S, and it creates a datetime object as year 1900, month1, day 1, hour H, minute M, and second S.

That's why to get the total of seconds is necessary to subtract the year, month and day.

print(get_total_seconds('1:23:45'))
>>> 5025.0

print(get_total_seconds('0:04:15'))
>>> 255.0

print(get_total_seconds('0:00:25'))
>>>25.0
1
  • 1
    This worked for me. I used "%H:%M:%S.%f" instead to handle decimal seconds
    – Tony M
    Jan 27, 2021 at 10:17
4

For %H:%M:%S.%f

def get_sec(time_str):
    h, m, s = time_str.split(':')
    return int(h) * 3600 + int(m) * 60 + float(s)
2

You can use lambda and reduce a list and the fact that m=60s and h=60m. (see "Reducing a List" at http://www.python-course.eu/lambda.php)

timestamp = "1:23:45"
seconds = reduce(lambda x, y: x*60+y, [int(i) for i in (timestamp.replace(':',',')).split(',')])
2

You can split the time into a list and add each individual time component, multiplying the hours component by 3600 (the number of seconds in an hour) and the minutes component by 60 (number of seconds in a minute), like:

timeInterval ='00:35:01'
list = timeInterval.split(':')
hours = list[0]
minutes = list[1]
seconds = list[2]
total = (int(hours) * 3600 + int(minutes) * 60 + int(seconds))
print("total = ", total)
2

I didn't really like any of the given answers, so I used the following:

def timestamp_to_seconds(t):
    return sum(float(n) * m for n,
               m in zip(reversed(time.split(':')), (1, 60, 3600))
               )
0
1
parts = time_string.split(":")
seconds = int(parts[0])*(60*60) + int(parts[1])*60 + int(parts[2])
1
  • Almost worked, I had to use int(...) as taskinoor suggested for it to work properly.
    – hughes
    Jun 19, 2011 at 14:12
1

Expanding on @FMc's solution which embodies half of Horner's method. Advantage of Horner's method: Skip reversing the list, avoid power calculation.

from functools import reduce

timestamp = "1:23:45"
seconds = reduce(lambda s, d: s * 60 + int(d), timestamp.split(":"), 0)

or, if you dislike reduce (as does Guido van Rossum and @0xc0de below):

timestamp = "1:23:45"
seconds = 0
for d in timestamp.split(":"):
    seconds = seconds * 60 + int(d)

If you prefer zip (as does @nathan-rice below):

from itertools import accumulate, repeat
from operator import mul

def timestamp_to_seconds(t):
    return sum(int(n) * m for n, m in
       zip(reversed(t.split(":")), accumulate(repeat(60), func=mul, initial=1)))

1
  • Goes a step forward in performance, but maybe a step backwards in readability, unless all your co-workers/fellow code readers are good with reduced readability. +1 for those cases, I am not a fan of reduce() though and would prefer to avoid these.
    – 0xc0de
    Jan 24, 2022 at 18:43
1

I liked tzot's answer above the best for my purposes because my H:M:S are human created and the can have float seconds part Here is my small modification

def hms_to_seconds(timestr:str)->float:
    """Get seconds from time.

    :param timestr: hh:mm:ss.xxx string or mm:s.xxx or simply s.xxx where xxx is the fraction of seconds
    :returns: time in float seconds
    """
    seconds= 0.
    for part in timestr.split(':'):
        seconds= seconds*60. + float(part)
    return seconds

>>> hms_to_seconds('3.00')
3.0
>>> hms_to_seconds('1:3.00')
63.0
>>> hms_to_seconds('1:0:3.5')
3603.5

0

Another alternative if you have days on string:

def duration2sec(string):
    if "days" in string:
        days = string.split()[0]
        hours = string.split()[2].split(':')
        return int(days) * 86400 + int(hours[0]) * 3600 + int(hours[1]) * 60 + int(hours[2])
    else:
        hours = string.split(':')
        return int(hours[0]) * 3600 + int(hours[1]) * 60 + int(hours[2])
2
  • The question asks for converting H:MM:SS time string to seconds not to convert days to to secs. Please have try to reword your answer for the question
    – Ram
    Oct 16, 2014 at 0:15
  • The example is functional, else part will do that. But I agree that the simpler the better.
    – kukido
    Oct 16, 2014 at 0:29
0

Just a simple generalization to the great response of taskinoor

In the context of my problem the format is similar, but includes AM or PM.

Format 'HH:MM:SS AM' or 'HH:MM:SS PM'

For this case the function changes to:

def get_sec(time_str):
"""Get Seconds from time."""
if 'AM' in time_str:
    time_str = time_str.strip('AM')
    h, m, s = time_str.split(':')
    seconds = int(h) * 3600 + int(m) * 60 + int(s)
if 'PM' in time_str:
    time_str = time_str.strip('PM')
    h, m, s = time_str.split(':')
    seconds = (12 + int(h)) * 3600 + int(m) * 60 + int(s)

return seconds 
0

In Pandas using @JayRizzo 's cool function and a list comprehension:

def get_sec(time_str):
    """Get Seconds from time."""
    h, m, s = time_str.split(':')
    return int(h) * 3600 + int(m) * 60 + int(s)

df['secs']=[get_sec(x) for x in df['original_time_string']]

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