4

Suppose I have two functions that receive different lambda types as arguments:

template<typename F>
void func1(F&& lambda) {
    // lambda must be [](unsigned int) -> short
}

template<typename F>
void func2(F&& lambda) {
    // lambda must be [](const vector<string>&) -> void
}

How can I restrict these lambda signatures in C++17, to match exactly what I need in each case?

7
  • 1
    Does this help? stackoverflow.com/a/50859251
    – pasbi
    Sep 23, 2020 at 13:52
  • 1
    Do you want to specifically restrict the signatures of lambdas or permit any given callable object type that can be called with a certain set of arguments? Sep 23, 2020 at 14:02
  • @pasbi It could be, but it doesn't seem to validate the return type. I'm having hard time with the given example, it's not compiling.
    – rodrigocfd
    Sep 23, 2020 at 14:11
  • @NicolBolas I want to restrict the signatures of the lambdas, including the return type.
    – rodrigocfd
    Sep 23, 2020 at 14:11
  • @rodrigocfd: Well, you can't specifically restrict the signature of a lambda because there's no mechanism you can use to distinguish a lambda from any other callable user-defined type. Sep 23, 2020 at 14:13

2 Answers 2

4

Pre C++20:

template<typename F, typename = std::enable_if_t<
    std::is_invocable_v<F, unsigned int>
>>
void  func1( F &&lambda ) {
    // lambda must be [](unsigned int) -> short
}

C++20:

template<typename F>
requires std::is_invocable_v<F, unsigned int>
void  func1( F &&lambda ) {
    // lambda must be [](unsigned int) -> short
}

Use std::is_invocable_r_v if you want to validate return type as well.

[EDIT]

... using std::is_invocable_r_v

template<typename F, typename = std::enable_if_t<
    std::is_invocable_r_v<short, F, unsigned int>
>>
void  func1( F &&lambda ) {
    // lambda must be [](unsigned int) -> short
}
3
  • Do you mind to write an example with is_invocable_r_v, validating the return type?
    – rodrigocfd
    Sep 23, 2020 at 15:22
  • 1
    You entirely glossed over that point that this would accept every functor that can be called with these arguments (and not just has those argument types). It's a crucial difference. Now, granted, this may be the better alternative at the end (checking exact signatures is a somewhat limited use case), but to omit an explanation of the difference is to act remiss. Sep 23, 2020 at 15:36
  • 1
    The return type is validated just as "convertible", right? (I mean, in this case my lambda can return int or short, since it's convertible.)
    – rodrigocfd
    Sep 23, 2020 at 15:37
3

A way that immediately pops to mind is to leverage std::function and its deduction guides. Using CTAD, the signature can be deduced automatically for certain types of functors (non-generic lambdas among them). It will look like this

template<typename F>
auto func1(F&& lambda) 
  -> std::enable_if_t<std::is_same_v<decltype(std::function{std::forward<F>(lambda)}), std::function<short(unsigned)>>> {
    // lambda must be [](unsigned int) -> short
}

std::function{std::forward<F>(lambda)} is a functional cast expression that attempts to convert the argument into a std::function whose template arguments get deduced. If the deduction is successful, we can obtain a type to compare against std::function<short(unsigned)>. With that in hand, we can use the usual SFINAE utilities in the standard library to constrain func1.

Mind however, that this doesn't constrain the function template only to lambdas, any functor for which the CTAD succeeds, and then matches the argument list, is going to be accepted.

2
  • It seems to work but my brain is melting now. I've never seen a function returning -> before, where I can learn about it?
    – rodrigocfd
    Sep 23, 2020 at 14:33
  • 2
    @rodrigocfd - That's just a trailing return type. It's a declaration style introduced by C++. It works for all functions, so even auto main() -> int {} is valid. I just prefer it for code that does SFINAE on the return type, because to me personally it seem more readable. Sep 23, 2020 at 14:35

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