6

I'm not sure if this is an opinionated question or if it is me misunderstanding what 'implicit' and 'explicit' really means in the context of Python.

a = []

# my understanding is that this is implicit
if not a:
   print("list is empty")

# my understanding is that this is explicit
if len(a) == 0:
   print("list is empty")

I'm trying to follow the Zen of Python rule, but I'm curious to know if this applies in this situation or if I am over-thinking it? Appreciate any guidance I can get.

5
  • 1
    Why a? Why list? Typo? – Mad Physicist Sep 25 '20 at 19:14
  • Yes, typo. Apologies for the mistake. – sir_chocolate_soup Sep 25 '20 at 19:15
  • That is indeed a bit weird. Changed it to == 0. In this case, it sounds like "len(a) == 0" is more explicit than "not a", but they are both considered explicit? – sir_chocolate_soup Sep 25 '20 at 19:18
  • It's only implicit in the sense that you need to know the "truthiness" of a list, but that's a pretty well established notion in Python. – chepner Sep 25 '20 at 19:19
  • if not a is explicitly checking if a is falsey (in this case empty). if len(a)==0 is explicitly checking if the length of a is equal to zero. – khelwood Sep 25 '20 at 19:20
7

The two statements have very different semantics. Remember that Python is dynamically typed.

For the case where a = [], both not a and len(a) == 0 are equivalent. A valid alternative might be to check not len(a). In some cases, you may even want to check for both emptiness and listness by doing a == [].

But a can be anything. For example, a = None. The check not a is fine, and will return True. But len(a) == 0 will not be fine at all. Instead you will get TypeError: object of type 'NoneType' has no len(). This is a totally valid option, but the if statements do very different things and you have to pick which one you want.

(Almost) everything has a __bool__ method in Python, but not everything has __len__. You have to decide which one to use based on the situation. Things to consider are:

  • Have you already verified whether a is a sequence?
  • Do you need to?
  • Do you mind if your if statement crashed on non-sequences?
  • Do you want to handle other falsy objects as if they were empty lists?

Remember that making the code look pretty takes second place to getting the job done correctly.

1
  • Thanks for the explanation! It seems like I was focusing on the readability rather than the underlying meaning of what's going on and the original intended purpose. – sir_chocolate_soup Sep 25 '20 at 19:48
1

Try to think of:

if not a:
    ...

as shorthand for:

if len(a) == 0:
    ...

I don't think this is a good example of a gotcha with Python's Zen rule of "explicit" over "implicit". This is done rather mostly because of readability. It's not that the second one is bad and the other is good. It's just that the first one is more skillful. If one understands boolean nature of lists in Python, I think you find the first is more readable and readability counts in Python.

5
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    One is not more skillful than the other. They mean different things. One only works for sequences, the other does not, for example. Knowing the differences is where the skill comes in. Otherwise this would be an opinion based question. – Mad Physicist Sep 25 '20 at 19:31
  • Good point but that's a matter of opinion I suppose. I wanted to point out that this is more for readability rather than a demonstration of explicit vs implicit. – Harlin Sep 25 '20 at 19:35
  • 1
    And I'm pointing out that there is a semantic difference. At that point, readability takes second place. – Mad Physicist Sep 25 '20 at 19:35
  • 1
    I think that's fair. – Harlin Sep 25 '20 at 19:36
  • 1
    As a fresh student of Python, readability has mattered quite a lot to me. Of course, that is assuming that the code is working as intended first :P – sir_chocolate_soup Sep 25 '20 at 19:50

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