Someting like a tee functionality in logger.

  • 1
    Adding | tee before the file worked for me, so Logger.new("| tee test.log"). Note the pipe. This was from a tip on coderwall.com/p/y_b3ra/… – mjwatts Jun 24 '16 at 12:57
  • @mjwatts Use tee --append test.log to prevent overwrites. – fangxing Jun 24 at 2:05

16 Answers 16

up vote 109 down vote accepted

You can write a pseudo IO class that will write to multiple IO objects. Something like:

class MultiIO
  def initialize(*targets)
     @targets = targets
  end

  def write(*args)
    @targets.each {|t| t.write(*args)}
  end

  def close
    @targets.each(&:close)
  end
end

Then set that as your log file:

log_file = File.open("log/debug.log", "a")
Logger.new MultiIO.new(STDOUT, log_file)

Every time Logger calls puts on your MultiIO object, it will write to both STDOUT and your log file.

Edit: I went ahead and figured out the rest of the interface. A log device must respond to write and close (not puts). As long as MultiIO responds to those and proxies them to the real IO objects, this should work.

  • if you look at the ctor of logger you will see that this will mess up log rotation. def initialize(log = nil, opt = {}) @dev = @filename = @shift_age = @shift_size = nil @mutex = LogDeviceMutex.new if log.respond_to?(:write) and log.respond_to?(:close) @dev = log else @dev = open_logfile(log) @dev.sync = true @filename = log @shift_age = opt[:shift_age] || 7 @shift_size = opt[:shift_size] || 1048576 end end – JeffCharter Sep 4 '14 at 20:45
  • 2
    Note in Ruby 2.2, @targets.each(&:close) is depreciated. – xis Nov 8 '15 at 9:32

@David's solution is very good. I've made a generic delegator class for multiple targets based on his code.

require 'logger'

class MultiDelegator
  def initialize(*targets)
    @targets = targets
  end

  def self.delegate(*methods)
    methods.each do |m|
      define_method(m) do |*args|
        @targets.map { |t| t.send(m, *args) }
      end
    end
    self
  end

  class <<self
    alias to new
  end
end

log_file = File.open("debug.log", "a")
log = Logger.new MultiDelegator.delegate(:write, :close).to(STDOUT, log_file)
  • Could you please explain, how this is better or what are enhanced utilities of this approach than the plain one suggested by David – Manish Sapariya Jun 24 '11 at 10:55
  • 3
    It's separation of concerns. MultiDelegator only knows about delegating calls to multiple targets. The fact that a logging device needs a write and a close method is implemented in the caller. This makes MultiDelegator usable in other situations than logging. – jonas054 Jul 14 '11 at 11:23
  • Beautiful solution. – Lykos Sep 29 '12 at 23:30
  • Nice solution. I tried to use this to tee the output from my rake tasks to a log file. In order to get it to work with puts though (to be able to call $stdout.puts without getting "private method `puts' called"), I had to add a few more methods: log_file = File.open("tmp/rake.log", "a") $stdout = MultiDelegator.delegate(:write, :close, :puts, :print).to(STDOUT, log_file) Would be nice if it were possible to create a Tee class that inherited from MultiDelegator, like you can do with the Delegator class in stdlib... – Tyler Rick Feb 19 '13 at 22:05
  • 1
    I really like your solution, but it is not good as a generic delegator that can be used multiple times as every delegation pollutes all instances with new methods. I posted an answer bellow (stackoverflow.com/a/36659911/123376) that fixes this problem. I posted an answer rather than an edit since it may be educational to see the difference between the two implementations as I also posted examples. – Rado Apr 16 '16 at 3:58

If you're in Rails 3 or 4, as this blog post points out, Rails 4 has this functionality built in. So you can do:

# config/environment/production.rb
file_logger = Logger.new(Rails.root.join("log/alternative-output.log"))
config.logger.extend(ActiveSupport::Logger.broadcast(file_logger))

Or if you're on Rails 3, you can backport it:

# config/initializers/alternative_output_log.rb

# backported from rails4
module ActiveSupport
  class Logger < ::Logger
    # Broadcasts logs to multiple loggers. Returns a module to be
    # `extended`'ed into other logger instances.
    def self.broadcast(logger)
      Module.new do
        define_method(:add) do |*args, &block|
          logger.add(*args, &block)
          super(*args, &block)
        end

        define_method(:<<) do |x|
          logger << x
          super(x)
        end

        define_method(:close) do
          logger.close
          super()
        end

        define_method(:progname=) do |name|
          logger.progname = name
          super(name)
        end

        define_method(:formatter=) do |formatter|
          logger.formatter = formatter
          super(formatter)
        end

        define_method(:level=) do |level|
          logger.level = level
          super(level)
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

file_logger = Logger.new(Rails.root.join("log/alternative-output.log"))
Rails.logger.extend(ActiveSupport::Logger.broadcast(file_logger))
  • is this applicable outside of rails, or rails only? – Ed Sykes Oct 23 '15 at 14:40
  • It's based on ActiveSupport, so if you have that dependency already, you can extend any ActiveSupport::Logger instance as shown above. – phillbaker Nov 29 '15 at 18:21
  • Thanks, it was helpful. – Lucas Dec 8 '15 at 15:39
  • I think this is the simplest and most effective answer, although I had some weirdness using the config.logger.extend() inside my environment configuration. Instead, I set config.logger to STDOUT in my environment, then extended the logger in different initializers. – mattsch Jul 7 '17 at 10:39

You can also add multiple device logging functionality directly into the Logger:

require 'logger'

class Logger
  # Creates or opens a secondary log file.
  def attach(name)
    @logdev.attach(name)
  end

  # Closes a secondary log file.
  def detach(name)
    @logdev.detach(name)
  end

  class LogDevice # :nodoc:
    attr_reader :devs

    def attach(log)
      @devs ||= {}
      @devs[log] = open_logfile(log)
    end

    def detach(log)
      @devs ||= {}
      @devs[log].close
      @devs.delete(log)
    end

    alias_method :old_write, :write
    def write(message)
      old_write(message)

      @devs ||= {}
      @devs.each do |log, dev|
        dev.write(message)
      end
    end
  end
end

For instance:

logger = Logger.new(STDOUT)
logger.warn('This message goes to stdout')

logger.attach('logfile.txt')
logger.warn('This message goes both to stdout and logfile.txt')

logger.detach('logfile.txt')
logger.warn('This message goes just to stdout')

Here's another implementation, inspired by @jonas054's answer.

This uses a pattern similar to Delegator. This way you don't have to list all the methods you want to delegate, since it will delegate all methods that are defined in any of the target objects:

class Tee < DelegateToAllClass(IO)
end

$stdout = Tee.new(STDOUT, File.open("#{__FILE__}.log", "a"))

You should be able to use this with Logger as well.

delegate_to_all.rb is available from here: https://gist.github.com/TylerRick/4990898

  • 2
    This seems like a super elegant way to solve the problem. – James Lim May 29 '13 at 21:31

For those who like it simple:

log = Logger.new("| tee test.log") # note the pipe ( '|' )
log.info "hi" # will log to both STDOUT and test.log

source

Or print the message in the Logger formatter:

log = Logger.new("test.log")
log.formatter = proc do |severity, datetime, progname, msg|
    puts msg
    msg
end
log.info "hi" # will log to both STDOUT and test.log

I'm actually using this technique to print to a log file, a cloud logger service (logentries) and if it's dev environment - also print to STDOUT.

  • "| tee test.log" will overwrites the old outputs, may be "| tee -a test.log" instead – fangxing Jun 24 at 2:02

While I quite like the other suggestions, I found I had this same issue but wanted the ability to have different logging levels for STDERR and the file (like I could with the bigger logging frameworks like NLog). I ended up with a routing strategy that multiplexes at the logger level rather than at the IO level, so that each logger could then operate at independent log-levels:

class MultiLogger
  def initialize(*targets)
    @targets = targets
  end

  %w(log debug info warn error fatal unknown).each do |m|
    define_method(m) do |*args|
      @targets.map { |t| t.send(m, *args) }
    end
  end
end

$stderr_log = Logger.new(STDERR)
$file_log = Logger.new(File.open('logger.log','a'))

$stderr_log.level = Logger::INFO
$file_log.level = Logger::DEBUG

$log = MultiLogger.new( $stderr_log, $file_log )

@jonas054's answer above is great, but it pollutes the MultiDelegator class with every new delegate. If you use MultiDelegator several times, it will keep adding methods to the class, which is undesirable. (See bellow for example)

Here is the same implementation, but using anonymous classes so the methods don't pollute the delegator class.

class BetterMultiDelegator

  def self.delegate(*methods)
    Class.new do
      def initialize(*targets)
        @targets = targets
      end

      methods.each do |m|
        define_method(m) do |*args|
          @targets.map { |t| t.send(m, *args) }
        end
      end

      class <<self
        alias to new
      end
    end # new class
  end # delegate

end

Here is an example of the method pollution with the original implementation, contrasted with the modified implementation:

tee = MultiDelegator.delegate(:write).to(STDOUT)
tee.respond_to? :write
# => true
tee.respond_to? :size
# => false 

All is good above. tee has a write method, but no size method as expected. Now, consider when we create another delegate:

tee2 = MultiDelegator.delegate(:size).to("bar")
tee2.respond_to? :size
# => true
tee2.respond_to? :write
# => true   !!!!! Bad
tee.respond_to? :size
# => true   !!!!! Bad

Oh no, tee2 responds to size as expected, but it also responds to write because of the first delegate. Even tee now responds to size because of the method pollution.

Contrast this to the anonymous class solution, everything is as expected:

see = BetterMultiDelegator.delegate(:write).to(STDOUT)
see.respond_to? :write
# => true
see.respond_to? :size
# => false

see2 = BetterMultiDelegator.delegate(:size).to("bar")
see2.respond_to? :size
# => true
see2.respond_to? :write
# => false
see.respond_to? :size
# => false

Are you restricted to the standard logger?

If not you may use log4r:

require 'log4r' 

LOGGER = Log4r::Logger.new('mylog')
LOGGER.outputters << Log4r::StdoutOutputter.new('stdout')
LOGGER.outputters << Log4r::FileOutputter.new('file', :filename => 'test.log') #attach to existing log-file

LOGGER.info('aa') #Writs on STDOUT and sends to file

One advantage: You could also define different log-levels for stdout and file.

Quick and dirty (ref: https://coderwall.com/p/y_b3ra/log-to-stdout-and-a-file-at-the-same-time)

require 'logger'
ll=Logger.new('| tee script.log')
ll.info('test')

I went to the same idea of "Delegating all methods to sub-elements" that other people already explored, but am returning for each of them the return value of the last call of the method. If I didn't, it broke logger-colors which were expecting an Integer and map was returning an Array.

class MultiIO
  def self.delegate_all
    IO.methods.each do |m|
      define_method(m) do |*args|
        ret = nil
        @targets.each { |t| ret = t.send(m, *args) }
        ret
      end
    end
  end

  def initialize(*targets)
    @targets = targets
    MultiIO.delegate_all
  end
end

This will redelegate every method to all targets, and return only the return value of the last call.

Also, if you want colors, STDOUT or STDERR must be put last, since it's the only two were colors are supposed to be output. But then, it will also output colors to your file.

logger = Logger.new MultiIO.new(File.open("log/test.log", 'w'), STDOUT)
logger.error "Roses are red"
logger.unknown "Violets are blue"

I have written a little RubyGem that allows you to do several of these things:

# Pipe calls to an instance of Ruby's logger class to $stdout
require 'teerb'

log_file = File.open("debug.log", "a")
logger = Logger.new(TeeRb::IODelegate.new(log_file, STDOUT))

logger.warn "warn"
$stderr.puts "stderr hello"
puts "stdout hello"

You can find the code on github: teerb

One more way. If you're using tagged logging and need tags in another logfile as well, you could do it in this way

# backported from rails4
# config/initializers/active_support_logger.rb
module ActiveSupport
 class Logger < ::Logger

 # Broadcasts logs to multiple loggers. Returns a module to be
 # `extended`'ed into other logger instances.
 def self.broadcast(logger)
  Module.new do
    define_method(:add) do |*args, &block|
      logger.add(*args, &block)
      super(*args, &block)
    end

    define_method(:<<) do |x|
      logger << x
      super(x)
    end

    define_method(:close) do
      logger.close
      super()
    end

    define_method(:progname=) do |name|
      logger.progname = name
      super(name)
    end

    define_method(:formatter=) do |formatter|
      logger.formatter = formatter
      super(formatter)
    end

    define_method(:level=) do |level|
      logger.level = level
      super(level)
    end

   end # Module.new
 end # broadcast

 def initialize(*args)
   super
   @formatter = SimpleFormatter.new
 end

  # Simple formatter which only displays the message.
  class SimpleFormatter < ::Logger::Formatter
   # This method is invoked when a log event occurs
   def call(severity, time, progname, msg)
   element = caller[4] ? caller[4].split("/").last : "UNDEFINED"
    "#{Thread.current[:activesupport_tagged_logging_tags]||nil } # {time.to_s(:db)} #{severity} #{element} -- #{String === msg ? msg : msg.inspect}\n"
   end
  end

 end # class Logger
end # module ActiveSupport

custom_logger = ActiveSupport::Logger.new(Rails.root.join("log/alternative_#{Rails.env}.log"))
Rails.logger.extend(ActiveSupport::Logger.broadcast(custom_logger))

After this you'll get uuid tags in alternative logger

["fbfea87d1d8cc101a4ff9d12461ae810"] 2015-03-12 16:54:04 INFO logger.rb:28:in `call_app' -- 
["fbfea87d1d8cc101a4ff9d12461ae810"] 2015-03-12 16:54:04 INFO   logger.rb:31:in `call_app' -- Started POST "/psp/entrypoint" for 192.168.56.1 at 2015-03-12 16:54:04 +0700

Hope that helps someone.

One more option ;-)

require 'logger'

class MultiDelegator
  def initialize(*targets)
    @targets = targets
  end

  def method_missing(method_sym, *arguments, &block)
    @targets.each do |target|
      target.send(method_sym, *arguments, &block) if target.respond_to?(method_sym)
    end
  end
end

log = MultiDelegator.new(Logger.new(STDOUT), Logger.new(File.open("debug.log", "a")))

log.info('Hello ...')

I like the MultiIO approach. It works well with Ruby Logger. If you use pure IO it stops working because it lacks some methods that IO objects are expected to have. Pipes were mentioned before here: How can I have ruby logger log output to stdout as well as file?. Here is what works best for me.

def watch(cmd)
  output = StringIO.new
  IO.popen(cmd) do |fd|
    until fd.eof?
      bit = fd.getc
      output << bit
      $stdout.putc bit
    end
  end
  output.rewind
  [output.read, $?.success?]
ensure
  output.close
end

result, success = watch('./my/shell_command as a String')

Note I know this doesn't answer the question directly but it is strongly related. Whenever I searched for output to multiple IOs I came across this thread.So, I hope you find this useful too.

I think your STDOUT is used for critical runtime info and errors raised.

So I use

  $log = Logger.new('process.log', 'daily')

to log debug and regular logging, and then wrote a few

  puts "doing stuff..."

where I need to see STDOUT information that my scripts were running at all!

Bah, just my 10 cents :-)

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.