11

Noting that this version with public method message() compiles and greet() works as expected,

class Foo {
    public greet() {
        console.log(`Hello, ${this.getMessage()}`);
    }
    getMessage() : string {
        return "I am Foo"
    }
}

class Goo extends Foo {
    getMessage() : string {
        return "I am Goo";
    }
}

but with getMessage() marked private, class Goo no longer compiles:

class Foo {
    public greet() {
        console.log(`Hello, ${this.getMessage()}`);
    }
    private getMessage() : string {
        return "I am Foo"
    }
}

class Goo extends Foo {
    private getMessage() : string {
        return "I am Goo";
    }
}

I often use private methods to break up larger methods by abstracting out chunks of low level code to improve readability as many books on the subject recommend, and I make them private because they are not intended to be called by consumers of the class, but for some reason typescript is working against me when one of these lower level methods needs to be modified for certain subclasses of my base class.

Practically speaking is there some other way to do this, aside from having to implement the public method in the extended class as well, or exposing the "dirty laundry" of the support method by including it the public interface of the base and child classes?

Also I'm wondering just as a matter of interest what is the motivation of the typescript authors for this seemingly arbitrary rule that public methods can be overriden but private methods can't?

1
  • 14
    Mark it protected instead of private. Private methods aren’t visible to extending classes, protected methods are. This is how C# is implemented and typescript mostly mirrors C#
    – bryan60
    Sep 27, 2020 at 0:08

3 Answers 3

15

As bryan60 said, use the protected modifier:

class Foo {
  public greet() {
    console.log(`Hello, ${this.getMessage()}`);
  }

  protected getMessage(): string {
    return "I am Foo";
  }
}

class Goo extends Foo {
  protected getMessage(): string {
    return "I am Goo";
  }
}

const goo = new Goo();
goo.greet(); // Hello, I am Goo

From the handbook:

The protected modifier acts much like the private modifier with the exception that members declared protected can also be accessed within deriving classes.

For example:

// Property 'getMessage' is protected and only accessible within class 'Goo'
// and its subclasses.
goo.getMessage();

class Hoo extends Goo {
  public getMessage(): string {
    return "I am Hoo";
  }

  public tryToGetGoosMessage(goo: Goo): string {
    // Property 'getMessage' is protected and only accessible through an
    // instance of class 'Hoo'.
    return goo.getMessage();
  }

  public doOtherHoosHoo(hoo: Hoo) {
    // ok, this is inside Hoo
    hoo.hoo();
  }

  protected hoo() {}
}

const hoo = new Hoo();
// ok, getMessage is public in Hoo
hoo.getMessage();

// Class 'Joo' incorrectly extends base class 'Hoo'.
//  Property 'getMessage' is protected in type 'Joo' but public in type 'Hoo'.
class Joo extends Hoo {
  protected getMessage(): string {
    return "I am Joo";
  }
}

Playground link

1
  • This is definitely the way to go. I built a class to manage messages using Dgrams in NodeJS, doing it this way I'm able to keep the class generic and override the message handling functions in the children. This way I can use the same library in many projects with ease.
    – Andrew
    Jul 18, 2022 at 13:03
7

Using protected is the correct way to solve this!

But if you have no access to the parent class (e.g. because it is within a library) you also could overwrite private class member-function in the constructor.

This is a very dirty and hacky! Don't do this as long as you can avoid this!

class Foo {
    public greet() {
        console.log(`Hello, ${this.getMessage()}`);
    }
    private getMessage() : string {
        return "I am Foo"
    }
}

class Goo extends Foo {
    constructor() {
        // overwrite private member "getMessage" 🙀
        (this as any).getMessage = () => {
            return "I am Goo"; 
        };
    }
}
5

If you really must override a private method and don’t have access to the parent class, a more type-safe and less hacky alternative to mojoaxel’s answer is to use bracket notation to access the private method:

class Foo {
    public greet() {
        console.log(`Hello, ${this.getMessage()}`);
    }

    private getMessage(): string {
        return "I am Foo";
    }
}

class Goo extends Foo {
    constructor() {
        super();
        this["getMessage"] = () => {
//          ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ this accesses the private method
            return "I am Goo"; 
        };
    }
}

If you use ESLint and have enabled dot-notation you might want to do

"@typescript-eslint/dot-notation": ["error", {"allowPrivateClassPropertyAccess": true}]

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