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I have an array ["Q10", "Q100", "Q1000", "Q1000a", "Q1001", "Q98"]. After sorting it, I get the following result:

['Q100', 'Q1000', 'Q1000a','Q98', 'Q10', 'Q1001'].sort
["Q10", "Q100", "Q1000", "Q1000a", "Q1001", "Q98"]

Because of this behaviour, I cannot sort my ActiveRecord objects correctly. I have a model of Question which has a field label. I need to sort it based on label. So Question with label Q1 would be first and the question with label Q1a would follow and so on. I get in a similar order with ActiveRecord described to the above example of array. I am using postgresql as my database.

Now I have 3 questions.

  1. Why alphanumeric string sorting behave that way?
  2. How can I achieve my required sorting without using the sort block?
  3. How can I achieve that sorting in ActiveRecord?
  • What label patterns / formats exist? – Stefan Sep 28 at 21:26
  • @stefan. It’s only in the following format: letter then number and then may or may not be a letter. – UsamaMan Sep 28 at 21:29
  • And you want to sort each part separately? i.e. alphabetically by leading letter, then numerically by number, then again alphabetically by trailing letter (if present) – Stefan Sep 28 at 21:34
  • We can ignore the letter in my case. Cary has answered the question in a lot of detail. It not only solves my problem but any other problem that could occur with my pattern. Please have a look. – UsamaMan Sep 28 at 21:36
  • 1
    I saw Cary's answers, it's great (as usual). But you specifically asked for a solution "without using the sort block" and "sorting in ActiveRecord" – did your requirements change? – Stefan Sep 28 at 21:38
4

If your array were

arr = ["Q10", "Q100", "Q1000", "Q8", "Q1001", "Q98"]

you could write

arr.sort_by { |s| s[/\d+/].to_i }
  #=> ["Q8", "Q10", "Q98", "Q100", "Q1000", "Q1001"]

If

s = "Q1000"

then

s[/\d+/].to_i
  #=> 1000

See Enumerable#sort_by and String#[].

The regular expression /\d+/ matches a substring of s that contains one or more digits.


If the array were

arr = ["Q10b", "Q100", "Q1000", "Q10a", "Q1001", "Q98", "Q10c"]

you could write

arr.sort_by { |s| [s[/\d+/].to_i, s[/\D+\z/]] }
  #=> ["Q10a", "Q10b", "Q10c", "Q98", "Q100", "Q1000", "Q1001"] 

If

s = "Q10b"

then

[s[/\d+/].to_i, s[/\D+\z/]]
  #=> [10, "b"]

The regular expression /\D+\z/ matches a substring of s that contains one or more non-digits at the end (\z) of the string.

See Array#<=>, specifically the third paragraph, for an explanation of how arrays are ordered when sorting.


If the array were

arr = ["Q10b", "P100", "Q1000", "PQ10a", "Q1001", "Q98", "Q10c"]

you could write

arr.sort_by { |s| [s[/\A\D+/], s[/\d+/].to_i, s[/\D+\z/]] }
  #=> ["P100", "PQ10a", "Q10b", "Q10c", "Q98", "Q1000", "Q1001"]

If

s = "PQ10a"

then

[s[/\A\D+/], s[/\d+/].to_i, s[/\D+\z/]]
  #=> ["PQ", 10, "a"]

The regular expression /\A\D+/ matches a substring of s that contains one or more non-digits at the beginning (\A) of the string.

| improve this answer | |
  • arr.sort_by { |s| s.split(/(\d+)/).each_slice(2).flat_map { |a, n| [a, n.to_i] } } is more general, though perhaps less readable :) – Amadan Sep 29 at 8:21
2

This should do the trick for you, casting them to numbers before sorting.

['100', '1000', '98', '10', '1001'].map(&:to_i).sort

This strange map(&:to_i) is shorthand for map { |x| x.to_i }

Edit:

You could do this with AR. This will throw an error if the column doesn't contain a number disguised as a string.

Model.order("some_column::integer")

Edit II:

Try this if it contains strings as well.

Model.order("cast(some_column as integer))"
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