13

I am trying to port a project (from linux) that uses Semaphores to Mac OS X however some of the posix semaphores are not implemented on Mac OS X

The one that I hit in this port is sem_timedwait()

I don't know much about semaphores but from the man pages sem_wait() seems to be close to sem_timedwait and it is implemented

From the man pages

sem_timedwait() function shall lock the semaphore referenced by
sem as in the sem_wait() function. However, if the semaphore cannot be
locked without waiting for another process or thread to unlock the
semaphore by performing a sem_post() function, this wait shall be ter-
minated when the specified timeout expires

From my limited understanding of how semphores work I can see that sem_timedwait() is safer, but I still should be able to use sem_wait()

Is this correct? If not what other alternatives do I have...

Thanks

6

It's likely that the timeout is important to the operation of the algorithm. Therefore just using sem_wait() might not work.

You could use sem_trywait(), which returns right away in all cases. You can then loop, and use a sleep interval that you choose, each time decrementing the total timeout until you either run out of timeout or the semaphore is acquired.

A much better solution is to rewrite the algorithm to use a condition variable, and then you can use pthread_cond_timedwait() to get the appropriate timeout.

4
  • 1
    A loop with trywait with a sleep will not work since a process would lose its position in the queue every time. If lots of threads or processes are trying to lock one semaphore some of them would always hit it when it is locked and thus timeout. A busy loop might work, but it is not a solution. – Eugene Aug 7 '09 at 0:04
  • How do you rewrite it to use a condition variable that works cross process, anyone? – rogerdpack Dec 21 '11 at 17:33
  • 1
    @rogerdpack, I guess it's been a while since you bothered yourself with using conditional variables for inter-process events in macOS. I'm currently dealing with the same situation... Perhaps do you have any idea about how to implement a substitution to sem_wait ? – Zohar81 Jul 22 '18 at 6:15
  • github.com/pmahoney/process_shared may be helpful but I have no idea myself, sorry! – rogerdpack Jul 27 '18 at 0:16
3

Yet another alternative may be to use the sem_timedwait.c implementation by Keith Shortridge of the Australian Astronomical Observatory's software group.

From the source file:

/*
*                       s e m _ t i m e d w a i t
*
*  Function:
*     Implements a version of sem_timedwait().
*
*  Description:
*     Not all systems implement sem_timedwait(), which is a version of
*     sem_wait() with a timeout. Mac OS X is one example, at least up to
*     and including version 10.6 (Leopard). If such a function is needed,
*     this code provides a reasonable implementation, which I think is
*     compatible with the standard version, although possibly less
*     efficient. It works by creating a thread that interrupts a normal
*     sem_wait() call after the specified timeout.
*
* ...
*
*  Limitations:
*
*     The mechanism used involves sending a SIGUSR2 signal to the thread
*     calling sem_timedwait(). The handler for this signal is set to a null
*     routine which does nothing, and with any flags for the signal 
*     (eg SA_RESTART) cleared. Note that this effective disabling of the
*     SIGUSR2 signal is a side-effect of using this routine, and means it
*     may not be a completely transparent plug-in replacement for a
*     'normal' sig_timedwait() call. Since OS X does not declare the
*     sem_timedwait() call in its standard include files, the relevant 
*     declaration (shown above in the man pages extract) will probably have
*     to be added to any code that uses this.
* 
* ...
* 
*  Copyright (c) Australian Astronomical Observatory.
*  Commercial use requires permission.
*  This code comes with absolutely no warranty of any kind.
*/
1
3

I used to use named semaphores on OSX, but now sem_timedwait isn't available and sem_init and friends are deprecated. I implemented semaphores using pthread mutex and conditions as follows which work for me (OSX 10.13.1). You might have to make a handle vs struct table and look up the sem_t type if it can't hold a ptr in it (i.e. pointers are 64bits and sem_t is 32?)

#ifdef __APPLE__

typedef struct
{
    pthread_mutex_t count_lock;
    pthread_cond_t  count_bump;
    unsigned count;
}
bosal_sem_t;

int sem_init(sem_t *psem, int flags, unsigned count)
{
    bosal_sem_t *pnewsem;
    int result;

    pnewsem = (bosal_sem_t *)malloc(sizeof(bosal_sem_t));
    if (! pnewsem)
    {
        return -1;
    }
    result = pthread_mutex_init(&pnewsem->count_lock, NULL);
    if (result)
    {
        free(pnewsem);
        return result;
    }
    result = pthread_cond_init(&pnewsem->count_bump, NULL);
    if (result)
    {
        pthread_mutex_destroy(&pnewsem->count_lock);
        free(pnewsem);
        return result;
    }
    pnewsem->count = count;
    *psem = (sem_t)pnewsem;
    return 0;
}

int sem_destroy(sem_t *psem)
{
    bosal_sem_t *poldsem;

    if (! psem)
    {
        return EINVAL;
    }
    poldsem = (bosal_sem_t *)*psem;

    pthread_mutex_destroy(&poldsem->count_lock);
    pthread_cond_destroy(&poldsem->count_bump);
    free(poldsem);
    return 0;
}

int sem_post(sem_t *psem)
{
     bosal_sem_t *pxsem;
    int result, xresult;

    if (! psem)
    {
        return EINVAL;
    }
    pxsem = (bosal_sem_t *)*psem;

    result = pthread_mutex_lock(&pxsem->count_lock);
    if (result)
    {
        return result;
    }
    pxsem->count = pxsem->count + 1;

    xresult = pthread_cond_signal(&pxsem->count_bump);

    result = pthread_mutex_unlock(&pxsem->count_lock);
    if (result)
    {
        return result;
    }
    if (xresult)
    {
        errno = xresult;
        return -1;
    }
}

int sem_trywait(sem_t *psem)
{
    bosal_sem_t *pxsem;
    int result, xresult;

    if (! psem)
    {
        return EINVAL;
    }
    pxsem = (bosal_sem_t *)*psem;

    result = pthread_mutex_lock(&pxsem->count_lock);
    if (result)
    {
        return result;
    }
    xresult = 0;

    if (pxsem->count > 0)
    {
        pxsem->count--;
    }
    else
    {
        xresult = EAGAIN;
    }
    result = pthread_mutex_unlock(&pxsem->count_lock);
    if (result)
    {
        return result;
    }
    if (xresult)
    {
        errno = xresult;
        return -1;
    }
    return 0;
}

int sem_wait(sem_t *psem)
{
    bosal_sem_t *pxsem;
    int result, xresult;

    if (! psem)
    {
        return EINVAL;
    }
    pxsem = (bosal_sem_t *)*psem;

    result = pthread_mutex_lock(&pxsem->count_lock);
    if (result)
    {
        return result;
    }
    xresult = 0;

    if (pxsem->count == 0)
    {
        xresult = pthread_cond_wait(&pxsem->count_bump, &pxsem->count_lock);
    }
    if (! xresult)
    {
        if (pxsem->count > 0)
        {
            pxsem->count--;
        }
    }
    result = pthread_mutex_unlock(&pxsem->count_lock);
    if (result)
    {
        return result;
    }
    if (xresult)
    {
        errno = xresult;
        return -1;
    }
    return 0;
}

int sem_timedwait(sem_t *psem, const struct timespec *abstim)
{
    bosal_sem_t *pxsem;
    int result, xresult;

    if (! psem)
    {
        return EINVAL;
    }
    pxsem = (bosal_sem_t *)*psem;

    result = pthread_mutex_lock(&pxsem->count_lock);
    if (result)
    {
        return result;
    }
    xresult = 0;

    if (pxsem->count == 0)
    {
        xresult = pthread_cond_timedwait(&pxsem->count_bump, &pxsem->count_lock, abstim);
    }
    if (! xresult)
    {
        if (pxsem->count > 0)
        {
            pxsem->count--;
        }
    }
    result = pthread_mutex_unlock(&pxsem->count_lock);
    if (result)
    {
        return result;
    }
    if (xresult)
    {
        errno = xresult;
        return -1;
    }
    return 0;
}

#endif
3
  • 1
    Brian - I think I owe you a beer, but the best I can do here is an upvote. My sem_timedwait() implementation using SIGUSR2 (mentioned by @chad) has worked well for me for years, but gave trouble in a recent project where its use of signals conflicted with the rest of the program structure. I found I could use your code by simply replacing the #include <semaphore.h> with typedef sem_t long int and the body of your code. You're missing a return 0 at the end of sem_post(), by the way. Your code isn't a simple addition of sem_timedwait(), but for cases where it can be applied it seems great! – KeithS Mar 23 '18 at 1:23
  • Brian, if you are reading this, two questions: 1) are you sure you ever need the malloc/free calls instead of just working on the input pointer? 2) I would like to borrow this code and make it part of my Github project. I expect to do some changes in your code. Is there any license preference / requirement that you would have for your code? And thanks for the example of course! – Stanislav Pankevich Jan 9 '20 at 10:28
  • 1
    1 - no you need the malloc (or some other scheme) to create memory for the call to sem_init which passes in a pointer to a sem_t type and that type could just be enough bytes to hold a pointer which is how its used here, and the bosal_sem_t type (Brian's OS Abstraction Layer)_ type is holds a bunch of stuff. You might invent a microallocator (bosal_sem_t pool[max_sems] or something of avoid malloc/free 2)The code is free to use open-spource, glad it was helpful as it took me a while to figure out! – Brian Jan 10 '20 at 18:06
2

Have you considered using the apache portable runtime? It's preinstalled on every Mac OS X Box and many Linux distros and it comes with a platform neutral wrapper around thread concurrency, that works even on MS Windows:

http://apr.apache.org/docs/apr/1.3/group__apr__thread__cond.html

0
1

I think the simplest solution is to use sem_wait() in combination with a call to alarm() to wake up abort the wait. For example:

alarm(2);
int return_value = sem_wait( &your_semaphore );
if( return_value == EINTR )
   printf( "we have been interrupted by the alarm." );

One issue is that alarm takes seconds as input so the timed wait might be too long in your case.

-- aghiles

0

Could you try to mimic the functionality of the sem_timedwait() call by starting a timer in another thread that calls sem_post() after the timer expires if it hasn't been called by the primary thread that is supposed to call sem_post()?

0

If you can just use MP API:

  • MPCreateSemaphore/MPDeleteSemaphore
  • MPSignalSemaphore/MPWaitOnSemaphore

MPWaitOnSemaphore exists with kMPTimeoutErr if specified timeout is exceeded without signaling.

1
  • Unfortunately, the MultiProcessing API has been deprecated in 10.7. – MaddTheSane Apr 11 '14 at 2:10
0

I was planning on using the following function as a replacement but then I discovered that sem_getvalue() was also deprecated and non-functional on OSX. You are free to use the following slightly untested code under a MIT or LGPL license (your choice).

#ifdef __APPLE__
struct CSGX__sem_timedwait_Info
{
    pthread_mutex_t MxMutex;
    pthread_cond_t MxCondition;
    pthread_t MxParent;
    struct timespec MxTimeout;
    bool MxSignaled;
};

void *CSGX__sem_timedwait_Child(void *MainPtr)
{
    CSGX__sem_timedwait_Info *TempInfo = (CSGX__sem_timedwait_Info *)MainPtr;

    pthread_mutex_lock(&TempInfo->MxMutex);

    // Wait until the timeout or the condition is signaled, whichever comes first.
    int Result;
    do
    {
        Result = pthread_cond_timedwait(&TempInfo->MxCondition, &TempInfo->MxMutex, &TempInfo->MxTimeout);
        if (!Result)  break;
    } while (1);
    if (errno == ETIMEDOUT && !TempInfo->MxSignaled)
    {
        TempInfo->MxSignaled = true;
        pthread_kill(TempInfo->MxParent, SIGALRM);
    }

    pthread_mutex_unlock(&TempInfo->MxMutex);

    return NULL;
}

int sem_timedwait(sem_t *sem, const struct timespec *abs_timeout)
{
    // Quick test to see if a lock can be immediately obtained.
    int Result;

    do
    {
        Result = sem_trywait(sem);
        if (!Result)  return 0;
    } while (Result < 0 && errno == EINTR);

    // Since it couldn't be obtained immediately, it is time to shuttle the request off to a thread.
    // Depending on the timeout, this could take longer than the timeout.
    CSGX__sem_timedwait_Info TempInfo;

    pthread_mutex_init(&TempInfo.MxMutex, NULL);
    pthread_cond_init(&TempInfo.MxCondition, NULL);
    TempInfo.MxParent = pthread_self();
    TempInfo.MxTimeout.tv_sec = abs_timeout->tv_sec;
    TempInfo.MxTimeout.tv_nsec = abs_timeout->tv_nsec;
    TempInfo.MxSignaled = false;

    sighandler_t OldSigHandler = signal(SIGALRM, SIG_DFL);

    pthread_t ChildThread;
    pthread_create(&ChildThread, NULL, CSGX__sem_timedwait_Child, &TempInfo);

    // Wait for the semaphore, the timeout to expire, or an unexpected error condition.
    do
    {
        Result = sem_wait(sem);
        if (Result == 0 || TempInfo.MxSignaled || (Result < 0 && errno != EINTR))  break;
    } while (1);

    // Terminate the thread (if it is still running).
    TempInfo.MxSignaled = true;
    int LastError = errno;

    pthread_mutex_lock(&TempInfo.MxMutex);
    pthread_cond_signal(&TempInfo.MxCondition);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&TempInfo.MxMutex);
    pthread_join(ChildThread, NULL);
    pthread_cond_destroy(&TempInfo.MxCondition);
    pthread_mutex_destroy(&TempInfo.MxMutex);

    // Restore previous signal handler.
    signal(SIGALRM, OldSigHandler);

    errno = LastError;

    return Result;
}
#endif

SIGALRM makes more sense than SIGUSR2 as another example here apparently uses (I didn't bother looking at it). SIGALRM is mostly reserved for alarm() calls, which are virtually useless when you want sub-second resolution.

This code first attempts to acquire the semaphore with sem_trywait(). If that immediately succeeds, then it bails out. Otherwise, it starts a thread which is where the timer is implemented via pthread_cond_timedwait(). The MxSignaled boolean is used to determine the timeout state.

You may also find this relevant function useful for calling the above sem_timedwait() implementation (again, MIT or LGPL, your choice):

int CSGX__ClockGetTimeRealtime(struct timespec *ts)
{
#ifdef __APPLE__
    clock_serv_t cclock;
    mach_timespec_t mts;

    if (host_get_clock_service(mach_host_self(), CALENDAR_CLOCK, &cclock) != KERN_SUCCESS)  return -1;
    if (clock_get_time(cclock, &mts) != KERN_SUCCESS)  return -1;
    if (mach_port_deallocate(mach_task_self(), cclock) != KERN_SUCCESS)  return -1;

    ts->tv_sec = mts.tv_sec;
    ts->tv_nsec = mts.tv_nsec;

    return 0;
#else
    return clock_gettime(CLOCK_REALTIME, ts);
#endif
}

Helps populate a timespec structure with the closest thing to what clock_gettime() can provide. There are various comments out there that calling host_get_clock_service() repeatedly is expensive. But starting up a thread is also expensive.

The real fix is for Apple to implement the entire POSIX specification, not just the mandatory parts. Implementing only the mandatory bits of POSIX and then claiming POSIX compliance just leaves everyone with a half-broken OS and tons of workarounds like the above that may have less-than-ideal performance.

The above all said, I am giving up on native semaphores (both Sys V and POSIX) on both Mac OSX and Linux. They are broken in quite a few rather unfortunate ways. Everyone else should give up on them too. (I'm not giving up on semaphores on those OSes, just the native implementations.) At any rate, now everyone has a sem_timedwait() implementation without commercial restrictions that others can copy-pasta to their heart's content.

0

One option is to use low-level semaphore mach API:

#include <mach/semaphore.h>

semaphore_create(...)

semaphore_wait(...)
semaphore_timedwait(...)
semaphore_signal(...)

semaphore_destroy(...)

It is used in libuv BTW.

Reference:

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