38

There are some new rules about rewritten comparison operators in C++20, and I'm trying to understand how they work. I've run into the following program:

struct B {};

struct A
{
    bool operator==(B const&);  // #1
};

bool operator==(B const&, A const&);  // #2

int main()
{
  B{} == A{};  // C++17: calls #2
               // C++20: calls #1
}

which actually breaks existing code. I'm a little surprised by this; #2 actually still looks better to me :p

So how do these new rules change the meaning of existing code?

  • 1
    Which compiler? Do other compilers do the same thing? What happens if you remove either definition for both language versions? – 1201ProgramAlarm Sep 30 at 3:19
  • @1201ProgramAlarm gcc and clang have consistent behavior as far as I can tell. Removing #1 calls #2 in both versions, and removing #2 fails to compile in c++17, neither of which are breaking changes. And both those results are expected I think. – cigien Sep 30 at 3:23
  • This seems to come about because of stuff in [over.match.oper] (section 12.4.1.2 Operators in Expressions in N4849). In particular the paragraphs talking about rewritten candidates are all new, and there's wordage in there that seems to allow using y==x (reversing the operands). I'm not sure how much of that should be included in an answer. – 1201ProgramAlarm Sep 30 at 3:46
  • @1201ProgramAlarm You're right, I don't actually want the specific rules per se, I can work through that. It's more I don't understand why #1 is a better choice. I'm not sure how to rephrase the question though. – cigien Sep 30 at 3:54
  • @1201ProgramAlarm Ok, edited the question a bit. Now only the rules needed to explain why the behavior of the program has changed, need to be in the answer. – cigien Sep 30 at 4:01
29

That particular aspect is a simple form of rewriting, reversing the operands. The primary operators == and <=> can be reversed, the secondaries !=, <, >, <=, and >=, can be rewritten in terms of the primaries.

The reversing aspect can be illustrated with a relatively simple example.

If you don't have a specific B::operator==(A) to handle b == a, you can use the reverse to do it instead: A::operator==(B). This makes sense because equality is a bi-directional relationship: (a == b) => (b == a).

Rewriting for secondary operators, on the other hand, involves using different operators. Consider a > b. If you cannot locate a function to do that directly, such as A::operator>(B), the language will go looking for things like A::operator<=>(B) then simply calculating the result from that.

That's a simplistic view of the process but it's one that most of my students seem to understand. If you want more details, it's covered in the [over.match.oper] section of C++20, part of overload resolution (@ is a placeholder for the operator):

For the relational and equality operators, the rewritten candidates include all member, non-member, and built-in candidates for the operator <=> for which the rewritten expression (x <=> y) @ 0 is well-formed using that operator<=>.

For the relational, equality, and three-way comparison operators, the rewritten candidates also include a synthesized candidate, with the order of the two parameters reversed, for each member, non-member, and built-in candidate for the operator <=> for which the rewritten expression 0 @ (y <=> x) is well-formed using that operator<=>.


Hence gone are the days of having to provide a real operator== and operator<, then boiler-plating:

operator!=      as      !  operator==
operator>       as      ! (operator== || operator<)
operator<=      as         operator== || operator<
operator>=      as      !  operator<

Don't complain if I've gotten one or more of those wrong, that just illustrates my point on how much better C++20 is, since you now only have to provide a minimal set (most likely just operator<=> plus whatever else you want for efficiency) and let the compiler look after it :-)


The question as to why one is being selected over the other can be discerned with this code:

#include <iostream>

struct B {};
struct A {
    bool operator==(B const&) { std::cout << "1\n"; return true; }
};
bool operator==(B const&, A const&) { std::cout << "2\n"; return true; }

int main() {
  auto b = B{}; auto a = A{};

           b ==          a;  // outputs: 1
  (const B)b ==          a;  //          1
           b == (const A)a;  //          2
  (const B)b == (const A)a;  //          2
}

The output of that indicates that it's the const-ness of a deciding which is the better candidate.

As an aside, you may want to have a look at this article, which offers a more in-depth look.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the answer, but the question then is why is the synthesized candidate (#1) a better match? – cigien Sep 30 at 3:57
  • 4
    The arguments are not const. The member is non-const, so it wins. – T.C. Sep 30 at 4:09
  • @T.C. Aah, I think that's it. To clarify, the rewritten operator mimics the const-qualifiers of the original operator? – cigien Sep 30 at 4:19
  • RE: Hence gone are the days of having to provide a real operator== and operator<, then boiler-plating: This is what I was essentially asking for when I asked this question, implementing one operator in terms of the remaining!... or am I again wrong? – d4rk4ng31 Sep 30 at 8:40
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20

From a non-language-lawyer sense, it works like this. C++20 requires that operator== compute whether the two objects are equal. The concept of equality is commutative: if A == B, then B == A. As such, if there are two operator== functions that could be called by C++20's argument reversal rules, then your code should behave identically either way.

Basically, what C++20 is saying is that if it matters which one gets called, you're defining "equality" incorrectly.


So let's get into the details. And by "the details", I mean the most horrifying chapter of the standard: function overload resolution.

[over.match.oper]/3 defines the mechanism by which the candidate function set for an operator overload is built. C++20 adds to this by introducing "rewritten candidates": a set of candidate functions discovered by rewriting the expression in a way that C++20 deems to be logically equivalent. This only applies to the relational and in/equality operators.

The set is built in accord with the following:

  • For the relational ([expr.rel]) operators, the rewritten candidates include all non-rewritten candidates for the expression x <=> y.
  • For the relational ([expr.rel]) and three-way comparison ([expr.spaceship]) operators, the rewritten candidates also include a synthesized candidate, with the order of the two parameters reversed, for each non-rewritten candidate for the expression y <=> x.
  • For the != operator ([expr.eq]), the rewritten candidates include all non-rewritten candidates for the expression x == y.
  • For the equality operators, the rewritten candidates also include a synthesized candidate, with the order of the two parameters reversed, for each non-rewritten candidate for the expression y == x.
  • For all other operators, the rewritten candidate set is empty.

Note the particular concept of a "synthesized candidate". This is standard-speak for "reversing the arguments".

The rest of the section details what it means if one of the rewritten candidates gets chosen (aka: how to synthesize the call). To find which candidate gets chosen, we must delve into the most horrifying part of the most horrifying chapter of the C++ standard:

Best viable function matching.

What matters here is this statement:

a viable function F1 is defined to be a better function than another viable function F2 if for all arguments i, ICSi(F1) is not a worse conversion sequence than ICSi(F2), and then

And that matters... because of this. Literally.

By the rules of [over.ics.scs], an identity conversion is a better match than a conversion that adds a qualifier.

A{} is a prvalue, and... it's not const. Neither is the this parameter to the member function. So it's an identity conversion, which is a better conversion sequence than one that goes to the const A& of the non-member function.

Yes, there is a rule further down that explicitly makes rewritten functions in the candidate list less viable. But it doesn't matter, because the rewritten call is a better match on function arguments alone.

If you use explicit variables and declare one like this A const a{};, then [over.match.best]/2.8 gets involved and de-prioritizes the rewritten version. As seen here. Similarly, if you make the member function const, you also get consistent behavior.

| improve this answer | |
  • This makes a lot of sense. Is it specifically stated anywhere that the rewritten operator has the same const-qualification as the original operator? Or does that not matter? – cigien Sep 30 at 4:27
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    @cigien: I'm not sure what you mean. The effects of A{} == B{} with regard to const qualfiication are well specified. So when the standard says to find candidates based on the expression y == x, there's nothing more that needs to be said. – Nicol Bolas Sep 30 at 4:31
  • I might be misunderstanding this; the compiler sees A::operator==(B const&) and synthesizes something like B::operator==(A const&). Is that right? If so, could the compiler synthesize B::operator==(A const&) const which is more natural for this operator anyway? – cigien Sep 30 at 4:35
  • 2
    @cigien: The compiler does not synthesize functions. It synthesizes expressions, which then resolve to an overload set of functions that are considered during overload resolution. Just look at the text I quoted from the standard about exactly how it works. – Nicol Bolas Sep 30 at 4:44
  • bool A::operator==(const B&) const is selected – Caleth Sep 30 at 9:04

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