2

I've been dealing with a problem of splitting a metric into several bands. To give you some context, let's take this example where we have certain number of orders per customer. Now, a customer may order n number of products. Let's give the customer certain discount based on the number of orders. The discounts are offered based a tiered model. I'm leaving out multiple product categories to keep it simple. Here are some examples of the tables.

Orders table

Customer    |   order_no
----------------------------
Customer1   |   400
Customer2   |   1200
Customer3   |   40
Customer4   |   2000
Customer5   |   700

Tiered pricing table

Tier   | lower_th | higer_th | price |
--------------------------------------
Tier1  | 0        | 250      | 50    |
TIer2  | 251      | 500      | 45    |
Tier3  | 501      | 1000     | 40    |
TIer4  | 1001     | 10000    |  30   |

Example1: I want to be able to charge Customer1 $50 for 250 order and $45 for the rest of 150 products out of a total of 400.

Example2: I want to be able to charge Customer5 $50 for 250 order and $45 for another 250 and $40 for the rest 200 products out of a total of 700.

How do I achieve this in PostgreSQL? My output needs to be the following for Customer1. What's the best way to split the total number of orders and join it to the pricing tiers to get the corresponding amount?

Customer  | order_no | charges |
--------------------------------
Customer1 | 250      | 50      |
Customer1 | 150      | 45      |
1
  • +Laurenz Albe thank you for editing the question. +a_horse_with_no_name thank you for fixing the table.
    – jp0d
    Sep 30, 2020 at 6:09

2 Answers 2

1

You can think of your tiers as intervals.

Two intervals [a1, b1] and [a2, b2] intersect when

a1 <= b2 AND b1 >= a2

The number of orders is another interval that always starts at 1.

Your two intervals are: Tiers [lower_th, higer_th] and Orders [1, order_no].

The query is a simple join using this intersection expression:

SELECT *
    ,CASE WHEN O.order_no > T.higer_th
    THEN T.higer_th - T.lower_th + 1 -- full tier
    ELSE O.order_no - T.lower_th + 1
    END AS SplitOrderNumbers
FROM
    Orders AS O
    INNER JOIN Tiers AS T
        -- ON 1 <= T.higer_th AND O.order_no >= T.lower_th
        ON O.order_no >= T.lower_th
ORDER BY
    O.Customer
    ,T.lower_th
;

You don't really need the 1 <= T.higer_th part, because it is always true, so the expression becomes simple O.order_no >= T.lower_th.

Also, usually it is better to store intervals as [closed; open). It usually simplifies arithmetic, similar to why most programming languages have array indexes starting at 0, not 1. Your intervals seem to be [closed; closed]. In this case you need to set lower_th to 1, not 0 and have +1 in the calculations.

With this adjustment of the sample data this query produces the following result:

+-----------+----------+-------+----------+----------+-------+-------------------+
| Customer  | order_no | Tier  | lower_th | higer_th | price | SplitOrderNumbers |
+-----------+----------+-------+----------+----------+-------+-------------------+
| Customer1 |      400 | Tier1 |        1 |      250 | 50.00 |               250 |
| Customer1 |      400 | Tier2 |      251 |      500 | 45.00 |               150 |
| Customer2 |     1200 | Tier1 |        1 |      250 | 50.00 |               250 |
| Customer2 |     1200 | Tier2 |      251 |      500 | 45.00 |               250 |
| Customer2 |     1200 | Tier3 |      501 |     1000 | 40.00 |               500 |
| Customer2 |     1200 | Tier4 |     1001 |    10000 | 30.00 |               200 |
| Customer3 |       40 | Tier1 |        1 |      250 | 50.00 |                40 |
| Customer4 |     2000 | Tier1 |        1 |      250 | 50.00 |               250 |
| Customer4 |     2000 | Tier2 |      251 |      500 | 45.00 |               250 |
| Customer4 |     2000 | Tier3 |      501 |     1000 | 40.00 |               500 |
| Customer4 |     2000 | Tier4 |     1001 |    10000 | 30.00 |              1000 |
| Customer5 |      700 | Tier1 |        1 |      250 | 50.00 |               250 |
| Customer5 |      700 | Tier2 |      251 |      500 | 45.00 |               250 |
| Customer5 |      700 | Tier3 |      501 |     1000 | 40.00 |               200 |
+-----------+----------+-------+----------+----------+-------+-------------------+
1
  • 1
    Thank you so much for the answer. This worked beautifully for my problem. Sorry about the late reply, I was away for a while.
    – jp0d
    Oct 20, 2020 at 1:45
1

For pricing data I would use a table like this to make data maintenance easier

create table pricing_data
(
   high_limit int, 
   price numeric
);

A view will give you the intervals you need for this using a window function:

create view pricing as
  select coalesce(lag(high_limit) over (order by high_limit), 0) as last_limit,
         high_limit, price
    from pricing_data;

This simplifies the breakout into pricing tiers:

select o.customer, 
       least(o.order_no - p.last_limit, p.high_limit - p.last_limit) as order_no,
       p.price as charges
  from orders o
  join pricing p on p.last_limit < o.order_no
 order by o.customer, p.price desc
;

Result:

customer    order_no    charges
Customer1    250            50
Customer1    150            45
Customer2    250            50
Customer2    250            45
Customer2    500            40
Customer2    200            30
Customer3     40            50
Customer4    250            50
Customer4    250            45
Customer4    500            40
Customer4   1000            30
Customer5    250            50
Customer5    250            45
Customer5    200            40
14 rows

Fiddle here.

2
  • . . Your answer is fine . . . but the pricing table already has the upper bound. Sep 30, 2020 at 11:53
  • Thank you so much for the answer. Sorry about the late reply, I was away for a while.
    – jp0d
    Oct 20, 2020 at 1:44

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