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For past 2 days I am not able to complete this code. I am trying to implement a hashtable. It contains only a single struct pointer variable start which stores a single struct object. I have declared an array of 26 objects of Hashtable to store a structure. The structure is stored by identifying the starting letter of val, which is a struct member.

If val="ascii" then it stores it in ht[0]. If val="struct", then it stores in ht[18].

I am inserting 5 values. If the values are already present in the hashtable, then it prints the value from the hashtable. Otherwise, it inserts the value. My program works fine without reallocation. When reallocation occurs the value in the hashtable does not show up. See the output below the code.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

struct List {
    char val[20];
};

struct Hashtable {
    struct List *start;
};

struct Hashtable ht[26];

void init();
void insert(struct List *);

void init() {
    register int j;
    for (j = 0; j < 26; j++) {
       ht[j].start=NULL;
    }
}

int main(void) {
    init();
    int i = 0;
    int size = 5; //size = 2 reallocation occurs
    struct List *newnode = (struct List*)malloc(size * sizeof(struct List));
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        if (size <= i) {
            size = size * size;
            struct List *temp = (struct List *)realloc(newnode, size * sizeof(*temp));
            if (temp == NULL) {
                printf("Realloc failed\n");
            } else {
                printf("realoocated\n");
                newnode = temp;
            }
        }
        scanf("%s", newnode[i].val);
        insert(&newnode[i]);
    }
    printf("Printing\n");
    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        printf("%s\n", newnode[i].val);
    }
    free(newnode);
    return 0;
}

void insert(struct List *node) {
    if (ht[node->val[0] - 97].start == NULL) {
        ht[node->val[0] - 97].start = node;
        return;
    } else {
        printf("The value is %s\n", ht[node->val[0] - 97].start->val);
    }
}

Output with reallocation:

struct
sample
The value is struct
realoocated
string
The value is
ascii
realoocated
alpha
The value is ascii

Printing
struct
sample
string
ascii
alpha

Output without reallocation

struct
sample
The value is struct
string
The value is struct
ascii
alpha
The value is ascii 

Printing
struct
sample
string
ascii
alpha
  • Lots of misconceptions here, you could do with some code review once you get it working. For now, just single step through the code using your favourite debugger and see where it goes wrong? It's hard for anyone else to reproduce this short of typing in the same input as you are. – Lundin Sep 30 '20 at 8:00
  • Welcome to stackoverflow! What @Lundin said, also (to elaborate) please read the docs on producing an MWE: stackoverflow.com/help/minimal-reproducible-example – wobr Sep 30 '20 at 8:03
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow! To give you a great answer, it might help us if you have a glance at How to Ask if you haven't already. It might be also useful if you could provide a minimal reproducible example. – Mat Sep 30 '20 at 9:31
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The basic problem you have is that when you call realloc, the block of memory (probably) "moves" to a new address. Any pointers to the old block are not magically updated, they just become invalid. So in your case, you store pointers to your struct List in the hashtable, and then you call realloc, which makes all those previously stored pointers invalid. When you later go look at those pointers, you get undefined behavior.

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