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I am currently learning about asymptotic analysis, however I am unsure of how many operations are in these nested loops. Would somebody be able to help me understand how to approach them? Also what would the Big-O notation be? (This is also my first time on stack overflow so please forgive any formatting errors in the code).

public static void primeFactors(int n){
    while( n % 2 == 0){
        System.out.print(2 + " ");
        n /= 2;
    }
    for(int i = 3; i <= Math.sqrt(n); i += 2){
        while(n % i ==  0){
            System.out.print(i + " ");
            n /= i;
        }
    }
}
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In the worst case, the first loop (while) is O(log(n)). In the second loop, the outer loop runs in O(sqrt(n)) and the inner loop runs in O(log_i(n)). Hence, the time complexity of the second loop (inner and outer in total) is:

 O(sum_{i = 3}^{sqrt(n)} log_i(n))

Therefore, the time complexity of the mentioned algorithm is O(sqrt(n) log(n)).

Notice that, if you mean n is modified inside the inner loop, and it affects on sqrt(n) in the outer loop, so the complexity of the second loop is O(sqrt(n)). Therefore, under this assumtion, the time complexity of the alfgorithm will be O(sqrt(n)) + O(log(n)) == O(sqrt(n)).

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  • I don't think it is right to multiply sqrt(n) with log(n), as the number of times the outer loop iterates is not independent of the number of times the inner loop executes. So I come to a different conclusion in my answer. – trincot Sep 30 at 19:01
  • @trincot It's correct. It might not be tight. – OmG Sep 30 at 19:02
  • It's formally correct because the O-notation gives you an upper bound. So O(n^2) would also be correct. – Mo B. Sep 30 at 19:06
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First, we see that the first loop is really a special case of the inner loop that occurs in the other loop, with i equal to two. It was separated as a special case in order to be able to increase i with steps of 2 instead of 1. But from the point of view of asymptotic complexity the step by 2 makes no difference: it represents a constant coefficient, which we can ignore. And so for our analysis we can just rewrite the code to this:

public static void primeFactors(int n){
    for(int i = 2; i <= Math.sqrt(n); i += 1){ // note the change in start and increment value
        while(n % i ==  0){
            System.out.print(i + " ");
            n /= i;
        }
    }
}

The number of times that n/i is executed, corresponds to the number of non-distinct prime divisors that a number has. According to this Q&A that number of times is O(loglogn). It is not straightforward to derive this, so I had to look it up.

We should also consider the number of times the for loop iterates. The Math.sqrt(n) boundary for i can lower as the for loop iterates. The more divisions take place, the (much) fewer iterations the for loop has to make.

We can see that at the time that the loop exits, i has surpassed the square root of the greatest prime divisor of n. In the worst case that greatest prime divisor is n itself (when n is prime). So the for loop can iterate up to the square root of n, so O(√n) times. In that case the inner loop never iterates (no divisions).

We should thus see which is more determining, and we get O(√n + loglogn). This is O(√n).

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The first loop divides n by 2 until it is not divisible by 2 anymore. The maximum number of time this can happen is log2(n).

The second loop, at first sight, seems to run sqrt(n) times the inner loop which is also O(log(n)), but that is actually not the case. Everytime the while condition of the second loop is satisfied, n is drastically decreased, and since the condition of a for-loop is executed on each iteration, sqrt(n) also decreases. The worst case actually happens if the condition of while loop is never satisfied, i.e. if n is prime.

Hence the overall time complexity is O(sqrt(n)).

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