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I have a data set of exercises that can be done when working out, in JSON format. I'm implementing a filtering system on this data, which has three different types of filters users can apply: sort filter, (which takes the current set of exercises and orders them by name a-z or vice versa), muscle group (exercises that fall under the same targeted muscle group) and training program (exercises that fall under the same training program).

Users should be able to select any of the filters and it will apply it straight away, but not all 3 types of filters have to be applied. Therefore, I have come up with the following function in JS:

function applyFilters(filters) {
  const sort = filters[0];
  const muscles = filters[1];
  const programs = filters[2];
  const exerciseJSONData = "exercises.json";

  $.getJSON(exerciseJSONData, {
    format: JSON,
  }).done(function (result) {
    let filteredArr = [];
    if (muscles.length === 0 && programs.length === 0) {
      filteredArr = result;
    } else if (muscles.length !== 0 && programs.length === 0) {
      $.each($(result), function (key, val) {
        if (muscles.some((item) => val.MainMuscleGroup.indexOf(item) >= 0)) {
          filteredArr.push(this);
        }
      });
    } else if (muscles.length === 0 && programs.length !== 0) {
      $.each($(result), function (key, val) {
        if (programs.some((item) => val.TrainingProgram.indexOf(item) >= 0)) {
          filteredArr.push(this);
        }
      });
    } else {
      $.each($(result), function (key, val) {
        if (
          muscles.some((item) => val.MainMuscleGroup.indexOf(item) >= 0) &&
          programs.some((item) => val.TrainingProgram.indexOf(item) >= 0)
        ) {
          filteredArr.push(this);
        }
      });
    }
    $("#number-of-exercises").text(filteredArr.length + " Exercises Found");
    $("#exercises").empty();
    createExerciseHTML(filteredArr);
  });
}

This function works as intended, however, I think the readability of the if else statement could be hard to understand for others and breaks the rule of not repeating code. I am wondering if there is a more concise and efficient way of coding this function? Thanks in advance.

P.S. Sorry if there was too much info at the beginning of this post, I wanted to give some context to avoid any confusion readers may have.

  • 5
    Have you heard of Code Review? With a little editing, your question would be more fit there then here in Stack Overflow. Just make sure to take their tour and read their How To Ask before posting. – Pedro Lima Sep 30 at 19:37
  • @PedroLima It's a shame the close option, in SO doesn't have the option for code review, I think SO Dev's could do with adding it. – Keith Sep 30 at 19:39
  • @Keith I partially agree. Close options suggesting another Stack Exchange site usually result in the question being automatically transferred to the target site. The problem is Code Review's guidelines describe a very restricted question format. Much more restricted then Stack Overflow. This question, for exemple, does NOT follow the Code Review's guidelines and would likely be flagged there if it were directly transferred. Which is why I suggested OP to read the Tour and How To Ask before posting there, because the question would require editing first. – Pedro Lima Sep 30 at 19:47
  • 1
    @Keith I disagree because there are a lot of times people suggest CR when it's not appropriate. In this case it is, however, that's absolutely not the case. – VLAZ Sep 30 at 19:48
  • 1
    @Keith in theory, yes. In practice, I still expect too many incorrect votes which would result in too many wrong migrations. Remember that it just takes three votes to initiate the migration and once a single vote is cast, others are powerless to stop it. You cannot vote against the migration, so it's more of a when, rather than an if, for whether the post will pick up two more votes from users who might not be experts on the migration target site and this not realise that the question is going to be closed there. TBH, the whole migration system is bad. – VLAZ Sep 30 at 19:55
1

You can start by taking the $each out and keep the if in the each.

function applyFilters(filters) {
   const sort = filters[0];
   const muscles = filters[1];
   const programs = filters[2];
   const exerciseJSONData = "exercises.json";
   
   $.getJSON(exerciseJSONData, {
      format: JSON,
   }).done(function (result) {
      let filteredArr = [];
      var hasMuschle = muscles.length > 0 ? 1 : 0;
      var hasProgram = programs.length > 0 ? 1 : 0;
      var muscleAndProgram = hasMuschle - hasProgram;
      $.each($(result), function (key, val) {
         
         if (muscles.length === 0 && programs.length === 0) {
            filteredArr = result;
         } else if (muscles.length !== 0 && programs.length === 0) {
            if (muscles.some((item) => val.MainMuscleGroup.indexOf(item) >= 0)) {
               filteredArr.push(this);
            }
         } else if (muscles.length === 0 && programs.length !== 0) {
            if (programs.some((item) => val.TrainingProgram.indexOf(item) >= 0)) {
               filteredArr.push(this);
            }
         } else {
            if (
               muscles.some((item) => val.MainMuscleGroup.indexOf(item) >= 0) &&
               programs.some((item) => val.TrainingProgram.indexOf(item) >= 0)
               ) {
                  filteredArr.push(this);
               }
            }
         })
         $("#number-of-exercises").text(filteredArr.length + " Exercises Found");
         $("#exercises").empty();
         createExerciseHTML(filteredArr);
      });
   }
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