2

I have an xml file with the below structure. I want to extract attributes of pa, pb, pc and save them to different dataframe.

<root0>
…
<root1>
…
<root2>
…
<root3>
    <class>
        <pa>
            <attributes>
            <a1>70</a1>
            <a2>1</a2>
            </attributes>
        </pa>
    </class>
    
    <class>
        <pb>
            <attributes>
            <b1>xx</b1>
            <b2>xx</b2>
            </attributes>
        </pb>
    </class>
    
    <class>
        <pc>
            <attributes>
            <c1>yy</c1>
            <c2>yy</c2>
            </attributes>
        </pc>
    </class>
    
    …..

Firstly, I print out all these Element '{http://www.xxx.yyy}class

import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET
tree = ET.parse(log)
root = tree.getroot()
for j in range(0,3):
    print(root[3][j])


output:   

<Element '{http://www.xxx.yyy}class' at 0x000000000B350A90>
<Element '{http://www.xxx.yyy}class' at 0x000000000B350E50>
<Element '{http://www.xxx.yyy}class' at 0x000000000B350AE0>
…

Then I try the findtext method:

for item in root[3]:
    print(item.findtext('pa'))

But it only return "None", not "a1" or "a2".

Can anyone help to explain?

Thanks

3
  • There is a namespace involved (http://www.xxx.yyy). See docs.python.org/3/library/…
    – mzjn
    Commented Oct 1, 2020 at 7:05
  • Also note that Pa (in your code) is not the same as pa (in the XML).
    – mzjn
    Commented Oct 1, 2020 at 9:44
  • @mzjn, yes that was a namespace trick. Thanks for your hint~~ BTW, Pa was just a typo in my post, thanks for picking it out :) Commented Oct 1, 2020 at 23:08

3 Answers 3

1

Here is my fix. But it does not look so elegant.

ns = {'n': '{http://www.xxx.yyy}'}

for item in root[3].findall('n:class',ns):
    for i in item.findall('n:pa',ns):
        j = mo.find('n:attributes/n:a1',ns)
        print (j.text)
1

Another method.

from simplified_scrapy import SimplifiedDoc, utils
xml = '''
<root0>
…
<root1>
…
<root2>
…
<root3>
    <class>
        <pa>
            <attributes>
            <a1>70</a1>
            <a2>1</a2>
            </attributes>
        </pa>
    </class>
    
    <class>
        <pb>
            <attributes>
            <b1>xx</b1>
            <b2>xx</b2>
            </attributes>
        </pb>
    </class>
    
    <class>
        <pc>
            <attributes>
            <c1>yy</c1>
            <c2>yy</c2>
            </attributes>
        </pc>
    </class>
</root3>
…..
'''

doc = SimplifiedDoc(xml)
classes = doc.root3.selects('class').select('attributes').children
# Or
# classes = doc.root3.selects('class').child.select('attributes').children
print (classes)
# Or
print ('-'*50)
classes = doc.root3.selects('class').child
for c in classes:
  print (c.tag, *c.select('attributes').children)

Result:

[[{'tag': 'a1', 'html': '70'}, {'tag': 'a2', 'html': '1'}], [{'tag': 'b1', 'html': 'xx'}, {'tag': 'b2', 'html': 'xx'}], [{'tag': 'c1', 'html': 'yy'}, {'tag': 'c2', 'html': 'yy'}]]
--------------------------------------------------
pa {'tag': 'a1', 'html': '70'} {'tag': 'a2', 'html': '1'}
pb {'tag': 'b1', 'html': 'xx'} {'tag': 'b2', 'html': 'xx'}
pc {'tag': 'c1', 'html': 'yy'} {'tag': 'c2', 'html': 'yy'}
0

It really depends on the structure of the XML document and on the structure of the dataframe you want to construct.

When all elements inside "class" are mandatory and there will be no absent elements, XPath approach could be used:

# here we define xml
xml = '''<root3 xmlms="http://www.xxx.yyy">
    <class>
        <pa>
            <attributes>
            <a1>70</a1>
            <a2>1</a2>
            </attributes>
        </pa>
    </class>
    
    <class>
        <pb>
            <attributes>
            <b1>xx</b1>
            <b2>xx</b2>
            </attributes>
        </pb>
    </class>
    
    <class>
        <pc>
            <attributes>
            <c1>yy</c1>
            <c2>yy</c2>
            </attributes>
        </pc>
    </class>
    </root3>'''

Here we parse XML using lxml library and XPath:

from lxml import etree as et

root = et.fromstring(xml)
d = {
     'a1': root.xpath('//*[local-name()="class"]//*[local-name()="a1"]/text()'),
     'a2': root.xpath('//*[local-name()="class"]//*[local-name()="a2"]/text()'),
     'b1': root.xpath('//*[local-name()="class"]//*[local-name()="b1"]/text()'),
     'b2': root.xpath('//*[local-name()="class"]//*[local-name()="b2"]/text()'),
     'c1': root.xpath('//*[local-name()="class"]//*[local-name()="c1"]/text()'),
     'c2': root.xpath('//*[local-name()="class"]//*[local-name()="c2"]/text()')
}
print(d)

Notation *[local-name()="class"] allows to ignore namespaces.

Result in this case will be dictionary:

{'a1': ['70'], 'a2': ['1'], 'b1': ['xx'], 'b2': ['xx'], 'c1': ['yy'], 'c2': ['yy']}

From this dictionary can be trivially build pandas dataframe:

import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame(d)

df.head()

Output:

Output

In case some elements a1, a2, b1, b2, c1, c2 etc may be missing under "attributes" element this approach may be not as efficient, because it will retrieve lists of different lengths, disallowing to construct from them dataframe. In that case iteration over element would be preferred approach:

from lxml import etree as et
from collections import defaultdict

root = et.fromstring(xml)

d = defaultdict(list)

for _class in root.findall('class', root.nsmap):
    print(_class)
    a1 = _class.find('.//a1',root.nsmap)
    d['a1'].append(None if a1 is None else a1.text)
    a2 = _class.find('.//a2',root.nsmap)
    d['a2'].append(None if a2 is None else a2.text)
    b1 = _class.find('.//b1',root.nsmap)
    d['b1'].append(None if b1 is None else b1.text)
    b2 = _class.find('.//b2',root.nsmap)
    d['b2'].append(None if b2 is None else b2.text)
    c1 = _class.find('.//c1',root.nsmap)
    d['c1'].append(None if c1 is None else c1.text)
    c2 = _class.find('.//c2',root.nsmap)
    d['c2'].append(None if c2 is None else c2.text)
        
print(d)

That will give output {'a1': ['70', None, None], 'a2': ['1', None, None], 'b1': [None, 'xx', None], 'b2': [None, 'xx', None], 'c1': [None, None, 'yy'], 'c2': [None, None, 'yy']}).

df = pd.DataFrame(d)
df.head()

Output:

Output

It's possible to fill dictionary keys dynamically depending on attribute name:

from lxml import etree as et
from collections import defaultdict

root = et.fromstring(xml)

d = defaultdict(list)

for _class in root.findall('class', root.nsmap):
    for attribute in _class.findall('.//attributes/*',root.nsmap):
        d[attribute.tag].append(attribute.text)
        
print(d)

This gives following output:

{'a1': ['70'], 'a2': ['1'], 'b1': ['xx'], 'b2': ['xx'], 'c1': ['yy'], 'c2': ['yy']}

Choose approach that suit your needs.

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