662

I want to add an item to an existing dictionary in Python. For example, this is my dictionary:

default_data = {
            'item1': 1,
            'item2': 2,
}

I want to add a new item such that:

default_data = default_data + {'item3':3}

How can I achieve this?

6

3 Answers 3

1342
default_data['item3'] = 3

Easy as py.

Another possible solution:

default_data.update({'item3': 3})

which is nice if you want to insert multiple items at once.

8
  • 4
    Sorry for the thread necro, but is there any reason to prefer one method over the other when adding one item?
    – Warrick
    Feb 26, 2013 at 14:01
  • 6
    @Warrick there's absolutely no difference except for personal taste. Personally I find the first to be a little more intuitive for just one item. Feb 26, 2013 at 19:22
  • which is faster? Jul 8, 2017 at 20:59
  • 2
    @user3067923 This is pure conjecture but I imagine that the first one would be marginally faster since it's mutating the dict in place, whereas the second one has to create a temporary dict, then mutate, then garbage collect the temporary dict. I'd need to benchmark it to say definitively. Sep 6, 2017 at 23:35
  • @ChrisEberle and either should be O(1), or at least quite close to it, is that right? Sep 7, 2017 at 22:56
92

It can be as simple as:

default_data['item3'] = 3

As Chris' answer says, you can use update to add more than one item. An example:

default_data.update({'item4': 4, 'item5': 5})

Please see the documentation about dictionaries as data structures and dictionaries as built-in types.

1
  • 3
    Useful for knowing that you can do multiple items in an update. Sep 24, 2017 at 14:10
25

It occurred to me that you may have actually be asking how to implement the + operator for dictionaries, the following seems to work:

>>> class Dict(dict):
...     def __add__(self, other):
...         copy = self.copy()
...         copy.update(other)
...         return copy
...     def __radd__(self, other):
...         copy = other.copy()
...         copy.update(self)
...         return copy
... 
>>> default_data = Dict({'item1': 1, 'item2': 2})
>>> default_data + {'item3': 3}
{'item2': 2, 'item3': 3, 'item1': 1}
>>> {'test1': 1} + Dict(test2=2)
{'test1': 1, 'test2': 2}

Note that this is more overhead then using dict[key] = value or dict.update(), so I would recommend against using this solution unless you intend to create a new dictionary anyway.

3
  • 3
    If you don't want to implement your own operators, you can also do dict(default_data.items() + {'item3': 3}.items())
    – Pakman
    Aug 23, 2013 at 13:56
  • 1
    @Pakman's comment doesn't work in Python3 (see: stackoverflow.com/questions/13361510/…)
    – Prof
    Feb 21, 2016 at 21:15
  • 1
    For Python 3, a quick fix to still use @Pakman comment is to cast the output of dict.items() in a list as follows: dict(list(default_data.items()) + list({'item3': 3}.items())), or even use the more idomatic: {**default_data, **{'item3': 3}}
    – H. Rev.
    Dec 17, 2019 at 15:37

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