8

Apparently, IDictionary<string,object> is serialized as an array of KeyValuePair objects (e.g., [{Key:"foo", Value:"bar"}, ...]). Is is possible to serialize it as an object instead (e.g., {foo:"bar"})?

  • 3
    yes, dont use JavaScriptSerializer, its utterly crap. Use Newtonsoft Json.NET – Andrew Bullock Jun 20 '11 at 20:33
11

Although I agree that JavaScriptSerializer is a crap and Json.Net is a better option, there is a way in which you can make JavaScriptSerializer serialize the way you want to. You will have to register a converter and override the Serialize method using something like this:

    public class KeyValuePairJsonConverter : JavaScriptConverter
{
    public override object Deserialize(IDictionary<string, object> dictionary, Type type, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        var instance = Activator.CreateInstance(type);

        foreach (var p in instance.GetType().GetPublicProperties())
        {
            instance.GetType().GetProperty(p.Name).SetValue(instance, dictionary[p.Name], null);
            dictionary.Remove(p.Name);
        }

        foreach (var item in dictionary)
            (instance).Add(item.Key, item.Value);

        return instance;
    }
    public override IDictionary<string, object> Serialize(object obj, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        var result = new Dictionary<string, object>();
        var dictionary = obj as IDictionary<string, object>;
        foreach (var item in dictionary)
            result.Add(item.Key, item.Value);
        return result;
    }
    public override IEnumerable<Type> SupportedTypes
    {
        get
        {
            return new ReadOnlyCollection<Type>(new Type[] { typeof(your_type) });
        }
    }
}

JavaScriptSerializer javaScriptSerializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
javaScriptSerializer.RegisterConverters(new JavaScriptConverter[] { new ExpandoJsonConverter() });
jsonOfTest = javaScriptSerializer.Serialize(test);
// {"x":"xvalue","y":"\/Date(1314108923000)\/"}

Hope this helps!

  • I'm trying to use your class but it seems your instance variable of ` Class Object` has no add method. – artifex_somnia Aug 12 '14 at 15:30
4

No, it is not possible with JavaScriptSerializer. It's possible with Json.NET:

public class Bar
{
    public Bar()
    {
        Foos = new Dictionary<string, string>
        {
            { "foo", "bar" }
        };
    }

    public Dictionary<string, string> Foos { get; set; }
}

and then:

var bar = new Bar();
string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(bar, new KeyValuePairConverter());

would produce the desired:

{"Foos":{"foo":"bar"}}
  • I was going that route at first. See my previous question: stackoverflow.com/questions/6416017/…. I had a problem deserializing nested dictionaries with Json.NET. – Daniel Jun 20 '11 at 20:43
  • 2
    @Daniel, Json.NET is sugar compared to JavaScriptSerializer. So if you have problems with Json.NET I don't know what to say about the alternative :-) As far as your other question is concerned, that's perfectly normal behavior. All you indicated to the serializer is a dictionary of string and object. So you are working with weakly typed dictionaries in your code, what do you expect in return? All you can get of course are a weakly typed JObjects. Use a strongly typed dictionary: Dictionary<string, SomeModel>, there will be a difference. – Darin Dimitrov Jun 20 '11 at 20:47
  • What difference are you referring to? I'm not seeing it. – Daniel Jun 20 '11 at 21:10
  • @Daniel, working vs non-working difference :-) – Darin Dimitrov Jun 20 '11 at 21:10
  • Sorry, I was just seeing Dictionary vs IDictionary -- got it. Thanks. – Daniel Jun 20 '11 at 21:23
3

I was able to solve with JavaScriptSerializer with Linq Select:

var dictionary = new Dictionary<int, string>();
var jsonOutput = new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(dictionary.Select(x => new { Id = x.Key, DisplayText = x.Value  }));
  • This doesn't work in complex cases (i.e. complex hierarchical structures), but it sure solves the problem in the simple case, so it's a solution to consider if you want to avoid adding boilerplate to JavaScriptSerializer or a third party library. – Joan Bruguera Jan 30 '18 at 12:48
  • For me it did work even in complex cases, just changing to .Serialize(dictionary). Its simpler then JsonConvert, ready to use. I wish I could give +2 to this answer – Z. Khullah Feb 1 '18 at 18:14
1

I was able to solve it using JavaScriptSerializer, the trick is to create your own converter. The following code is working code:

public class KeyValuePairJsonConverter : JavaScriptConverter {
    public override object Deserialize(IDictionary<string, object> dictionary
                                        , Type type
                                        , JavaScriptSerializer serializer) {
        throw new InvalidOperationException("Sorry, I do serializations only.");
    }

    public override IDictionary<string, object> Serialize(object obj, JavaScriptSerializer serializer) {
        Dictionary<string, object> result = new Dictionary<string, object>();
        Dictionary<string, MyClass> dictionaryInput = obj as Dictionary<string, MyClass>;

        if (dictionaryInput == null) {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Object must be of Dictionary<string, MyClass> type.");
        }

        foreach (KeyValuePair<string, MyClass> pair in dictionaryInput)
            result.Add(pair.Key, pair.Value);

        return result;
    }

    public override IEnumerable<Type> SupportedTypes {
        get {
            return new ReadOnlyCollection<Type>(new Type[] { typeof(Dictionary<string, MyClass>) });
        }
    }
}

And here's how you use it:

JavaScriptSerializer js = new JavaScriptSerializer();
js.RegisterConverters(new JavaScriptConverter[] { new KeyValuePairJsonConverter() });
Context.Response.Clear();
Context.Response.ContentType = "application/json";
Context.Response.Write(js.Serialize(myObject));
1

Here's an I believe improved version from Tomas answer. Works like a charm. We could also add a check for the ScriptIgnore attribute but well, knock yourself out.

BTW, I chose JavaScriptSerializer because in my opinion third party solutions are most of the time: less known, long to install, often forgotten pre-requities and have blur copy-right states that make them risky to distribute in business.

P-S: I didn`t understood why we were trying to deserialize both to the instance and to the instance as a dictionary, so I stripped that part.

public class KeyValuePairJsonConverter : JavaScriptConverter
{
    public override object Deserialize(IDictionary<string, object> deserializedJSObjectDictionary, Type targetType, JavaScriptSerializer javaScriptSerializer)
    {
        Object targetTypeInstance = Activator.CreateInstance(targetType);

        FieldInfo[] targetTypeFields = targetType.GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);

        foreach (FieldInfo fieldInfo in targetTypeFields)
            fieldInfo.SetValue(targetTypeInstance, deserializedJSObjectDictionary[fieldInfo.Name]);

        return targetTypeInstance;
    }

    public override IDictionary<string, object> Serialize(Object objectToSerialize, JavaScriptSerializer javaScriptSerializer)
    {
       IDictionary<string, object> serializedObjectDictionary = new Dictionary<string, object>();

       FieldInfo[] objectToSerializeTypeFields = objectToSerialize.GetType().GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);

       foreach (FieldInfo fieldInfo in objectToSerializeTypeFields)
           serializedObjectDictionary.Add(fieldInfo.Name, fieldInfo.GetValue(objectToSerialize));

       return serializedObjectDictionary;
    }

    public override IEnumerable<Type> SupportedTypes
    {
        get
        {
            return new ReadOnlyCollection<Type>(new Type[] { typeof(YOURCLASSNAME) });
        }
    }
}
  • Regarding my PS note. Perhaps this was to allow specidying a generic dictionary type rather than a type, but honestly I don`t see the point of specifying a generic dictionary type as this whole thing is about deserializing <String, XYZ> dictionaries. And it's cubersome. – Olograph Apr 22 '14 at 20:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.