9

When I have a small piece of code like this:

#include <iostream>

class A {
public:
    friend inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A&);
};

inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A&) {
    os << "Called\n";
    return os;
}

class B {
public:
    operator A() { return A(); }
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    std::cout << a;
    B b;
    std::cout << b;
}

the operator<< is called twice for both a and b, because b has an implicit user conversion operator for type A. But I was surprised when I modified the code to this:

#include <iostream>

class A {
public:
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A&) {
        os << "Called\n";
        return os;
    }
};

class B {
public:
    operator A() { return A(); }
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    std::cout << a;
    B b;
    std::cout << b;
}

As you see, I have just transferred the definition inside the class rather than using a free function and marking it as a friend of the class. But this code gives an error which says no suitable function for operator<< is found for b.

Why does this problem happen?

10
  • 1
    I'm not sure exactly what the process is, but I believe it's related to the name lookup process performed to generate candidate functions when evaluating std::cout << b. In your second code example, I don't think it looks inside the class definition of A for function declarations, but in the first it sees the function declaration (and definition) that occurs at file scope. When I place a line std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A&); after the definition of A but before main, it behaves as in the first code snippet, outputting "Called" twice. Oct 4 '20 at 17:26
  • 2
    @NathanPierson but cpp ref for my 2nd code says: (only allowed in non-local class definitions) Defines a non-member function, and makes it a friend of this class at the same time. Such non-member function is always inline. From this line, I assume that there should be no difference between these 2 codes.
    – Afshin
    Oct 4 '20 at 17:35
  • 1
    @mfnx it should be friend to be considered as non-member function. If not, it won't be called for even for A.
    – Afshin
    Oct 4 '20 at 17:39
  • 1
    @Afshin No, Nathan is right. In your second example, if you're outside of class A, the operator<< can only ever be found by ADL. The operator<< is a non-member function, it is a friend of the A, and it is inline (so cppreference is not wrong) but it also has the unique property that if you don't give a declaration outside of A then you can only find it through ADL. I think the idea is that the operator<< is only defined within the scope of A (and ADL, when searching for things related to A, looks into that scope, so it can find it), but otherwise it's not in scope.
    – HTNW
    Oct 4 '20 at 17:54
  • 1
    Can't say for sure without going through the standard, but I double down on previous comments: in the 2nd example the operator can only be found through adl
    – bolov
    Oct 4 '20 at 18:18
7

It comes down to how C++ generates candidate functions when performing overload resolution. It's trying to find candidates for operator<<(std::cout, b). This means it performs unqualified name lookup which includes performing argument-dependent lookup (ADL). Let's take a look at how that works.

For the first code snippet, unqualified name lookup finds the declaration when it looks in the enclosing scope of the calling code, without needing to perform ADL. It sees inline std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A&) as a candidate, and then is able to apply the user-defined conversion to b to see that it's a valid function to use for overload resolution. All well and good.

For the second code snippet, though, we don't have a declaration of operator<< at file scope. The declaration and definition are entirely within the definition of the class A. That still might let us find it as a candidate function for std::cout << b, but it'll have to be through ADL. Let's check to see if it's actually visible through that:

Otherwise, for every argument in a function call expression its type is examined to determine the associated set of namespaces and classes that it will add to the lookup.

...

  1. For arguments of class type (including union), the set consists of

a) The class itself

b) All of its direct and indirect base classes

c) If the class is a member of another class, the class of which it is a member

d) The innermost enclosing namespaces of the classes added to the set

At any stage, would we look inside the definition of A when performing ADL with arguments std::cout and b? None of a), b), and c) apply to A because A isn't B, A isn't a base class of B, and A doesn't contain B as a member. Crucially, "any class to which the class is implicitly convertible" isn't used to generate candidates through ADL.

So ultimately in the second code snippet, the name lookup never sees the declaration of std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A&) and never realizes that it can apply a user-defined conversion to apply it with the appropriate arguments.

If we just make the function declaration (not definition) visible at file scope like so:

#include <iostream>

class A {
public:
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A&) {
        os << "Called\n";
        return os;
    }
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A&);

class B {
public:
    operator A() { return A(); }
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    std::cout << a;
    B b;
    std::cout << b;
}

This function declaration is once again found through ordinary unqualified name lookup, the user-defined conversion comes in during overload resolution, and the expected output of "Called" being printed twice is recovered.

-3

because you use friend only if you want access to the members of the class but still they need to defined as a global function and then make them friend function of the class.

1

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