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I'm trying to exit a program with assembly instructions, but when I compile with gcc it says that mov is a bad instruction, even when I use movl which I don't even know what it is. Is it even possible to exit a program with assembly instructions?

int main(void)
{
    __asm__("movl %rax, $60\n\t"
        "movl %rdi, $0\n\t"
        "syscall\n");
}
// cc main.c -o main && ./main
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  • Note that having mov instructions in inline assembly is generally a code smell. Instead, use constraints and extended inline assembly: asm volatile ("syscall" :: "a"(60), "D"(0));
    – fuz
    Commented Oct 5, 2020 at 8:14
  • 1
    I encourage readers to never make system calls by crafting their own assembly.
    – vmemmap
    Commented Oct 5, 2020 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

3

You need movq for 64 bit. Also, your operations are not in the correct order.

The following compiles:

int main(void)
{
    __asm__("movq $60, %rax\n\t"
        "movq $0, %rdi\n\t"
        "syscall\n");
}

Note that for any other system call (which doesn't terminate the whole program), it's necessary to tell the compiler which registers are clobbered, and usually to use a "memory" clobber to make sure memory is in sync with C values before a system call reads or writes memory.

Also, to pass operands, you'll need Extended asm syntax. See How to invoke a system call via sysenter in inline assembly? for an example my_write wrapper. (Which has only "syscall" inside the asm template; we ask the compiler to put the call number and args in the right registers instead of writing mov)

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  • operations are not in the correct order, but when I write an (Hello, World) program I first use the register and then the argument. Can you explain what's the difference between Inline asm code in C and a regular asm program? Commented Oct 4, 2020 at 18:52
  • or you can leave off the suffixe like q and l altogether in this case since one of the operands has a known size (the register). You might also consider moving to the 32-bit registers (eax and edi) since the processor will automatically zero extend through the upper 32-bits of the corresponding 64-bit register. Commented Oct 4, 2020 at 18:54
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    @perrorundefinedvariableun : they mean that in at&t syntax the source is first and the destination is second. Intel syntax is the other way around (dest, src). Commented Oct 4, 2020 at 18:55
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    @perrorundefinedvariableun and it is because when you use inline assembler in a C file, the compiler will compile it to assembler and then somewhat literally paste these among the other assembler opcodes, so even though GAS could support intel ordering, GCC wouldn't. Commented Oct 4, 2020 at 19:12
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    @AnttiHaapala: gcc -masm=intel does use .intel_syntax noprefix at the top of the .s temporary it feeds to as. Referencing memory operands in .intel_syntax GNU C inline assembly Commented Oct 5, 2020 at 0:18

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