34

My normal search foo is failing me. I'm trying to find an R function that returns ALL of the factors of an integer. There are at least 2 packages with factorize() functions: gmp and conf.design, however these functions return only prime factors. I'd like a function that returns all factors.

Obviously searching for this is made difficult since R has a construct called factors which puts a lot of noise in the search.

  • perhaps a bit naive, but something like div <- seq_len(x); x[x %% div == 0] where x is your integer of interest should work, right? – Chase Jun 21 '11 at 12:13
  • 1
    @Chase your comment has a small flaw. It should be div[x %% div == 0] – Ramnath Jun 21 '11 at 12:32
  • 4
    Now you will have to explain where these factors enter into weather and crop modelling :) – Dirk Eddelbuettel Jun 21 '11 at 13:13
  • 1
    I'm sorry, you used a word I don't recognize. What's this word, "rule" mean? :) – JD Long Jun 23 '11 at 14:12
  • 1
    @JosephWood I'm amused at the realization that my online musings of almost 7 years ago are still periodically being read. – JD Long Apr 12 '18 at 15:08
23

To follow up on my comment (thanks to @Ramnath for my typo), the brute force method seems to work reasonably well here on my 64 bit 8 gig machine:

FUN <- function(x) {
    x <- as.integer(x)
    div <- seq_len(abs(x))
    factors <- div[x %% div == 0L]
    factors <- list(neg = -factors, pos = factors)
    return(factors)
}

A few examples:

> FUN(100)
$neg
[1]   -1   -2   -4   -5  -10  -20  -25  -50 -100

$pos
[1]   1   2   4   5  10  20  25  50 100

> FUN(-42)
$neg
[1]  -1  -2  -3  -6  -7 -14 -21 -42

$pos
[1]  1  2  3  6  7 14 21 42

#and big number

> system.time(FUN(1e8))
   user  system elapsed 
   1.95    0.18    2.14 
| improve this answer | |
  • 10
    Use integers: div[x %% div == 0L] and x<-as.integer(x). Should be 2x faster. – Marek Jun 21 '11 at 13:35
  • @Marek - wicked smart. indeed about 2x faster. I should use these sorts of tricks more often. Thanks. – Chase Jun 21 '11 at 15:53
  • 5
    If you don't need the input itself, you can use div <- seq_len(abs(x / 2)) instead, which should take less than half the time. – ceiling cat Oct 8 '14 at 0:26
  • 1
    It does not return correct results for big numbers. E.g. FUN(12345678987654321) – George Dontas Jan 14 '16 at 8:13
  • 4
    @GeorgeDontas - by all means, please feel free to suggest a solution that works for numbers that large. I personally have zero desire to modify my answer to address 17 digit numbers. – Chase Jan 19 '16 at 17:39
15

You can get all factors from the prime factors. gmp calculates these very quickly.

library(gmp)
library(plyr)

get_all_factors <- function(n)
{
  prime_factor_tables <- lapply(
    setNames(n, n), 
    function(i)
    {
      if(i == 1) return(data.frame(x = 1L, freq = 1L))
      plyr::count(as.integer(gmp::factorize(i)))
    }
  )
  lapply(
    prime_factor_tables, 
    function(pft)
    {
      powers <- plyr::alply(pft, 1, function(row) row$x ^ seq.int(0L, row$freq))
      power_grid <- do.call(expand.grid, powers)
      sort(unique(apply(power_grid, 1, prod)))
    }
  )
}

get_all_factors(c(1, 7, 60, 663, 2520, 75600, 15876000, 174636000, 403409160000))
| improve this answer | |
  • For the record, system.time(get_all_factors(1e8)) registers as 0s. – Richie Cotton Jun 21 '11 at 14:07
  • 1
    I have tried to use this code and for some reason it isn't working for me for certain cases (It could be something I'm doing). See my post below. By the way, I really like this algorithm. – Joseph Wood Apr 28 '15 at 16:31
  • @JosephWood You are right, the algorithm was nonsense (not sure who upvoted this before!). I've fixed the code, and I'm confident that it now works as it should. – Richie Cotton May 4 '15 at 7:26
  • could you provide a brief explanation of the function call at the bottom of your algorithm. It is a bit confounding to me as it is clear in your algorithm that get_all_factors only takes numeric arguments whereas you are passing a vector of mixed data types (i.e. integers and numerics) at the bottom. Also, when I comment the bottom function call out, it still seems to work. Thanks!! – Joseph Wood May 5 '15 at 13:33
  • @JosephWood That was lazy typing on my part. I'd intended to make a vector or integers (having the 'L' suffix everywhere), but must have gotten bored typing part way through. Either integer or numeric vectors are acceptable as an input to get_all_factors. – Richie Cotton May 6 '15 at 9:17
9

Update

This is now implemented in the package RcppBigIntAlgos. See this answer for more details.

Original Post

The algorithm has been fully updated and now implements multiple polynomials as well as some clever sieving techniques that eliminates millions of checks. In addition to the original links, this paper along with this post from primo were very helpful for this last stage (many kudos to primo). Primo does a great job of explaining the guts of the QS in a relatively short space and also wrote a pretty amazing algorithm (it will factor the number at the bottom, 38! + 1, in under 2 secs!! Insane!!).

As promised, below is my humble R implementation of the Quadratic Sieve. I have been working on this algorithm sporadically since I promised it in late January. I will not try to explain it fully (unless requested... also, the links below do a very good job) as it is very complicated and hopefully, my function names speak for themselves. This has proved to be one of the most challenging algorithms I have ever attempted to execute as it is demanding both from a programmer's point of view as well as mathematically. I have read countless papers and ultimately, I found these five to be the most helpful (QSieve1, QSieve2, QSieve3, QSieve4, QSieve5).

N.B. This algorithm, as it stands, does not serve very well as a general prime factorization algorithm. If it was optimized further, it would need to be accompanied by a section of code that factors out smaller primes (i.e. less than 10^5 as suggested by this post), then call QuadSieveAll, check to see if these are primes, and if not, call QuadSieveAll on both of these factors, etc. until you are left with all primes (all of these steps are not that difficult). However, the main point of this post is to highlight the heart of the Quadratic Sieve, so the examples below are all semiprimes (even though it will factor most odd numbers not containing a square… Also, I haven’t seen an example of the QS that didn’t demonstrate a non-semiprime). I know the OP was looking for a method to return all factors and not the prime factorization, but this algorithm (if optimized further) coupled with one of the algorithms above would be a force to reckon with as a general factoring algorithm (especially given that the OP was needing something for Project Euler, which usually requires much more than brute force methods). By the way, the MyIntToBit function is a variation of this answer and the PrimeSieve is from a post that @Dontas appeared on a while back (Kudos on that as well).

QuadSieveMultiPolysAll <- function(MyN, fudge1=0L, fudge2=0L, LenB=0L) {
### 'MyN' is the number to be factored; 'fudge1' is an arbitrary number
### that is used to determine the size of your prime base for sieving;
### 'fudge2' is used to set a threshold for sieving;
### 'LenB' is a the size of the sieving interval. The last three
### arguments are optional (they are determined based off of the
### size of MyN if left blank)

### The first 8 functions are helper functions

    PrimeSieve <- function(n) {
        n <- as.integer(n)
        if (n > 1e9) stop("n too large")
        primes <- rep(TRUE, n)
        primes[1] <- FALSE
        last.prime <- 2L
        fsqr <- floor(sqrt(n))
        while (last.prime <= fsqr) {
            primes[seq.int(last.prime^2, n, last.prime)] <- FALSE
            sel <- which(primes[(last.prime + 1):(fsqr + 1)])
            if (any(sel)) {
                last.prime <- last.prime + min(sel)
            } else {
                last.prime <- fsqr + 1
            }
        }
        MyPs <- which(primes)
        rm(primes)
        gc()
        MyPs
    }

    MyIntToBit <- function(x, dig) {
        i <- 0L
        string <- numeric(dig)
        while (x > 0) {
            string[dig - i] <- x %% 2L
            x <- x %/% 2L
            i <- i + 1L
        }
        string
    }

    ExpBySquaringBig <- function(x, n, p) {
        if (n == 1) {
            MyAns <- mod.bigz(x,p)
        } else if (mod.bigz(n,2)==0) {
            MyAns <- ExpBySquaringBig(mod.bigz(pow.bigz(x,2),p),div.bigz(n,2),p)
        } else {
            MyAns <- mod.bigz(mul.bigz(x,ExpBySquaringBig(mod.bigz(
                pow.bigz(x,2),p), div.bigz(sub.bigz(n,1),2),p)),p)
        }
        MyAns
    }

    TonelliShanks <- function(a,p) {
        P1 <- sub.bigz(p,1); j <- 0L; s <- P1
        while (mod.bigz(s,2)==0L) {s <- s/2; j <- j+1L}
        if (j==1L) {
            MyAns1 <- ExpBySquaringBig(a,(p+1L)/4,p)
            MyAns2 <- mod.bigz(-1 * ExpBySquaringBig(a,(p+1L)/4,p),p)
        } else {
            n <- 2L
            Legendre2 <- ExpBySquaringBig(n,P1/2,p)
            while (Legendre2==1L) {n <- n+1L; Legendre2 <- ExpBySquaringBig(n,P1/2,p)}
            x <- ExpBySquaringBig(a,(s+1L)/2,p)
            b <- ExpBySquaringBig(a,s,p)
            g <- ExpBySquaringBig(n,s,p)
            r <- j; m <- 1L
            Test <- mod.bigz(b,p)
            while (!(Test==1L) && !(m==0L)) {
                m <- 0L
                Test <- mod.bigz(b,p)
                while (!(Test==1L)) {m <- m+1L; Test <- ExpBySquaringBig(b,pow.bigz(2,m),p)}
                if (!m==0) {
                    x <- mod.bigz(x * ExpBySquaringBig(g,pow.bigz(2,r-m-1L),p),p)
                    g <- ExpBySquaringBig(g,pow.bigz(2,r-m),p)
                    b <- mod.bigz(b*g,p); r <- m
                }; Test <- 0L
            }; MyAns1 <- x; MyAns2 <- mod.bigz(p-x,p)
        }
        c(MyAns1, MyAns2)
    }

    SieveLists <- function(facLim, FBase, vecLen, sieveD, MInt) {
        vLen <- ceiling(vecLen/2); SecondHalf <- (vLen+1L):vecLen
        MInt1 <- MInt[1:vLen]; MInt2 <- MInt[SecondHalf]
        tl <- vector("list",length=facLim)
        
        for (m in 3:facLim) {
            st1 <- mod.bigz(MInt1[1],FBase[m])
            m1 <- 1L+as.integer(mod.bigz(sieveD[[m]][1] - st1,FBase[m]))
            m2 <- 1L+as.integer(mod.bigz(sieveD[[m]][2] - st1,FBase[m]))
            sl1 <- seq.int(m1,vLen,FBase[m])
            sl2 <- seq.int(m2,vLen,FBase[m])
            tl1 <- list(sl1,sl2)
            st2 <- mod.bigz(MInt2[1],FBase[m])
            m3 <- vLen+1L+as.integer(mod.bigz(sieveD[[m]][1] - st2,FBase[m]))
            m4 <- vLen+1L+as.integer(mod.bigz(sieveD[[m]][2] - st2,FBase[m]))
            sl3 <- seq.int(m3,vecLen,FBase[m])
            sl4 <- seq.int(m4,vecLen,FBase[m])
            tl2 <- list(sl3,sl4)
            tl[[m]] <- list(tl1,tl2)
        }
        tl
    }

    SieverMod <- function(facLim, FBase, vecLen, SD, MInt, FList, LogFB, Lim, myCol) {
        
        MyLogs <- rep(0,nrow(SD))
        
        for (m in 3:facLim) {
            MyBool <- rep(FALSE,vecLen)
            MyBool[c(FList[[m]][[1]][[1]],FList[[m]][[2]][[1]])] <- TRUE
            MyBool[c(FList[[m]][[1]][[2]],FList[[m]][[2]][[2]])] <- TRUE
            temp <- which(MyBool)
            MyLogs[temp] <- MyLogs[temp] + LogFB[m]
        }
        
        MySieve <- which(MyLogs > Lim)
        MInt <- MInt[MySieve]; NewSD <- SD[MySieve,]
        newLen <- length(MySieve); GoForIT <- FALSE
        
        MyMat <- matrix(integer(0),nrow=newLen,ncol=myCol)
        MyMat[which(NewSD[,1L] < 0),1L] <- 1L; MyMat[which(NewSD[,1L] > 0),1L] <- 0L
        if ((myCol-1L) - (facLim+1L) > 0L) {MyMat[,((facLim+2L):(myCol-1L))] <- 0L}
        if (newLen==1L) {MyMat <- matrix(MyMat,nrow=1,byrow=TRUE)}
        
        if (newLen > 0L) {
            GoForIT <- TRUE
            for (m in 1:facLim) {
                vec <- rep(0L,newLen)
                temp <- which((NewSD[,1L]%%FBase[m])==0L)
                NewSD[temp,] <- NewSD[temp,]/FBase[m]; vec[temp] <- 1L
                test <- temp[which((NewSD[temp,]%%FBase[m])==0L)]
                while (length(test)>0L) {
                    NewSD[test,] <- NewSD[test,]/FBase[m]
                    vec[test] <- (vec[test]+1L)
                    test <- test[which((NewSD[test,]%%FBase[m])==0L)]
                }
                MyMat[,m+1L] <- vec
            }
        }
        
        list(MyMat,NewSD,MInt,GoForIT)
    }

    reduceMatrix <- function(mat) {
        tempMin <- 0L; n1 <- ncol(mat); n2 <- nrow(mat)
        mymax <- 1L
        for (i in 1:n1) {
            temp <- which(mat[,i]==1L)
            t <- which(temp >= mymax)
            if (length(temp)>0L && length(t)>0L) {
                MyMin <- min(temp[t])
                if (!(MyMin==mymax)) {
                    vec <- mat[MyMin,]
                    mat[MyMin,] <- mat[mymax,]
                    mat[mymax,] <- vec
                }
                t <- t[-1]; temp <- temp[t]
                for (j in temp) {mat[j,] <- (mat[j,]+mat[mymax,])%%2L}
                mymax <- mymax+1L
            }
        }
        
        if (mymax<n2) {simpMat <- mat[-(mymax:n2),]} else {simpMat <- mat}
        lenSimp <- nrow(simpMat)
        if (is.null(lenSimp)) {lenSimp <- 0L}
        mycols <- 1:n1
        
        if (lenSimp>1L) {
            ## "Diagonalizing" Matrix
            for (i in 1:lenSimp) {
                if (all(simpMat[i,]==0L)) {simpMat <- simpMat[-i,]; next}
                if (!simpMat[i,i]==1L) {
                    t <- min(which(simpMat[i,]==1L))
                    vec <- simpMat[,i]; tempCol <- mycols[i]
                    simpMat[,i] <- simpMat[,t]; mycols[i] <- mycols[t]
                    simpMat[,t] <- vec; mycols[t] <- tempCol
                }
            }
            
            lenSimp <- nrow(simpMat); MyList <- vector("list",length=n1)
            MyFree <- mycols[which((1:n1)>lenSimp)];  for (i in MyFree) {MyList[[i]] <- i}
            if (is.null(lenSimp)) {lenSimp <- 0L}
            
            if (lenSimp>1L) {
                for (i in lenSimp:1L) {
                    t <- which(simpMat[i,]==1L)
                    if (length(t)==1L) {
                        simpMat[ ,t] <- 0L
                        MyList[[mycols[i]]] <- 0L
                    } else {
                        t1 <- t[t>i]
                        if (all(t1 > lenSimp)) {
                            MyList[[mycols[i]]] <- MyList[[mycols[t1[1]]]]
                            if (length(t1)>1) {
                                for (j in 2:length(t1)) {MyList[[mycols[i]]] <- c(MyList[[mycols[i]]], MyList[[mycols[t1[j]]]])}
                            }
                        }
                        else {
                            for (j in t1) {
                                if (length(MyList[[mycols[i]]])==0L) {MyList[[mycols[i]]] <- MyList[[mycols[j]]]}
                                else {
                                    e1 <- which(MyList[[mycols[i]]]%in%MyList[[mycols[j]]])
                                    if (length(e1)==0) {
                                        MyList[[mycols[i]]] <- c(MyList[[mycols[i]]],MyList[[mycols[j]]])
                                    } else {
                                        e2 <- which(!MyList[[mycols[j]]]%in%MyList[[mycols[i]]])
                                        MyList[[mycols[i]]] <- MyList[[mycols[i]]][-e1]
                                        if (length(e2)>0L) {MyList[[mycols[i]]] <- c(MyList[[mycols[i]]], MyList[[mycols[j]]][e2])}
                                    }
                                }
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
                TheList <- lapply(MyList, function(x) {if (length(x)==0L) {0} else {x}})
                list(TheList,MyFree)
            } else {
                list(NULL,NULL)
            }
        } else {
            list(NULL,NULL)
        }
    }

    GetFacs <- function(vec1, vec2, n) {
        x <- mod.bigz(prod.bigz(vec1),n)
        y <- mod.bigz(prod.bigz(vec2),n)
        MyAns <- c(gcd.bigz(x-y,n),gcd.bigz(x+y,n))
        MyAns[sort.list(asNumeric(MyAns))]
    }

    SolutionSearch <- function(mymat, M2, n, FB) {
        
        colTest <- which(apply(mymat, 2, sum) == 0)
        if (length(colTest) > 0) {solmat <- mymat[ ,-colTest]} else {solmat <- mymat}
        
        if (length(nrow(solmat)) > 0) {
            nullMat <- reduceMatrix(t(solmat %% 2L))
            listSol <- nullMat[[1]]; freeVar <- nullMat[[2]]; LF <- length(freeVar)
        } else {LF <- 0L}
        
        if (LF > 0L) {
            for (i in 2:min(10^8,(2^LF + 1L))) {
                PosAns <- MyIntToBit(i, LF)
                posVec <- sapply(listSol, function(x) {
                    t <- which(freeVar %in% x)
                    if (length(t)==0L) {
                        0
                    } else {
                        sum(PosAns[t])%%2L
                    }
                })
                ansVec <- which(posVec==1L)
                if (length(ansVec)>0) {
                    
                    if (length(ansVec) > 1L) {
                        myY <- apply(mymat[ansVec,],2,sum)
                    } else {
                        myY <- mymat[ansVec,]
                    }
                    
                    if (sum(myY %% 2) < 1) {
                        myY <- as.integer(myY/2)
                        myY <- pow.bigz(FB,myY[-1])
                        temp <- GetFacs(M2[ansVec], myY, n)
                        if (!(1==temp[1]) && !(1==temp[2])) {
                            return(temp)
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    
### Below is the main portion of the Quadratic Sieve

    BegTime <- Sys.time(); MyNum <- as.bigz(MyN); DigCount <- nchar(as.character(MyN))
    P <- PrimeSieve(10^5)
    SqrtInt <- .mpfr2bigz(trunc(sqrt(mpfr(MyNum,sizeinbase(MyNum,b=2)+5L))))
    
    if (DigCount < 24) {
        DigSize <- c(4,10,15,20,23)
        f_Pos <- c(0.5,0.25,0.15,0.1,0.05)
        MSize <- c(5000,7000,10000,12500,15000)
        
        if (fudge1==0L) {
            LM1 <- lm(f_Pos ~ DigSize)
            m1 <- summary(LM1)$coefficients[2,1]
            b1 <- summary(LM1)$coefficients[1,1]
            fudge1 <- DigCount*m1 + b1
        }
        
        if (LenB==0L) {
            LM2 <- lm(MSize ~ DigSize)
            m2 <- summary(LM2)$coefficients[2,1]
            b2 <- summary(LM2)$coefficients[1,1]
            LenB <- ceiling(DigCount*m2 + b2)
        }
        
        LimB <- trunc(exp((.5+fudge1)*sqrt(log(MyNum)*log(log(MyNum)))))
        B <- P[P<=LimB]; B <- B[-1]
        facBase <- P[which(sapply(B, function(x) ExpBySquaringBig(MyNum,(x-1)/2,x)==1L))+1L]
        LenFBase <- length(facBase)+1L
    } else if (DigCount < 67) {
        ## These values were obtained from "The Multiple Polynomial
        ## Quadratic Sieve" by Robert D. Silverman
        DigSize <- c(24,30,36,42,48,54,60,66)
        FBSize <- c(100,200,400,900,1200,2000,3000,4500)
        MSize <- c(5,25,25,50,100,250,350,500)
        
        LM1 <- loess(FBSize ~ DigSize)
        LM2 <- loess(MSize ~ DigSize)
        
        if (fudge1==0L) {
            fudge1 <- -0.4
            LimB <- trunc(exp((.5+fudge1)*sqrt(log(MyNum)*log(log(MyNum)))))
            myTarget <- ceiling(predict(LM1, DigCount))
            
            while (LimB < myTarget) {
                LimB <- trunc(exp((.5+fudge1)*sqrt(log(MyNum)*log(log(MyNum)))))
                fudge1 <- fudge1+0.001
            }
            B <- P[P<=LimB]; B <- B[-1]
            facBase <- P[which(sapply(B, function(x) ExpBySquaringBig(MyNum,(x-1)/2,x)==1L))+1L]
            LenFBase <- length(facBase)+1L
            
            while (LenFBase < myTarget) {
                fudge1 <- fudge1+0.005
                LimB <- trunc(exp((.5+fudge1)*sqrt(log(MyNum)*log(log(MyNum)))))
                myind <- which(P==max(B))+1L
                myset <- tempP <- P[myind]
                while (tempP < LimB) {
                    myind <- myind + 1L
                    tempP <- P[myind]
                    myset <- c(myset, tempP)
                }
                
                for (p in myset) {
                    t <- ExpBySquaringBig(MyNum,(p-1)/2,p)==1L
                    if (t) {facBase <- c(facBase,p)}
                }
                B <- c(B, myset)
                LenFBase <- length(facBase)+1L
            }
        } else {
            LimB <- trunc(exp((.5+fudge1)*sqrt(log(MyNum)*log(log(MyNum)))))
            B <- P[P<=LimB]; B <- B[-1]
            facBase <- P[which(sapply(B, function(x) ExpBySquaringBig(MyNum,(x-1)/2,x)==1L))+1L]
            LenFBase <- length(facBase)+1L
        }
        if (LenB==0L) {LenB <- 1000*ceiling(predict(LM2, DigCount))}
    } else {
        return("The number you've entered is currently too big for this algorithm!!")
    }
    
    SieveDist <- lapply(facBase, function(x) TonelliShanks(MyNum,x))
    SieveDist <- c(1L,SieveDist); SieveDist[[1]] <- c(SieveDist[[1]],1L); facBase <- c(2L,facBase)
    Lower <- -LenB; Upper <- LenB; LenB2 <- 2*LenB+1L; MyInterval <- Lower:Upper
    M <- MyInterval + SqrtInt ## Set that will be tested
    SqrDiff <- matrix(sub.bigz(pow.bigz(M,2),MyNum),nrow=length(M),ncol=1L)
    maxM <- max(MyInterval)
    LnFB <- log(facBase)
    
    ## N.B. primo uses 0.735, as his siever
    ## is more efficient than the one employed here
    if (fudge2==0L) {
        if (DigCount < 8) {
            fudge2 <- 0
        } else if (DigCount < 12) {
            fudge2 <- .7
        } else if (DigCount < 20) {
            fudge2 <- 1.3
        } else {
            fudge2 <- 1.6
        }
    }
    
    TheCut <- log10(maxM*sqrt(2*asNumeric(MyNum)))*fudge2
    myPrimes <- as.bigz(facBase)
    
    CoolList <- SieveLists(LenFBase, facBase, LenB2, SieveDist, MyInterval)
    GetMatrix <- SieverMod(LenFBase, facBase, LenB2, SqrDiff, M, CoolList, LnFB, TheCut, LenFBase+1L)
    
    if (GetMatrix[[4]]) {
        newmat <- GetMatrix[[1]]; NewSD <- GetMatrix[[2]]; M <- GetMatrix[[3]]
        NonSplitFacs <- which(abs(NewSD[,1L])>1L)
        newmat <- newmat[-NonSplitFacs, ]
        M <- M[-NonSplitFacs]
        lenM <- length(M)
        
        if (class(newmat) == "matrix") {
            if (nrow(newmat) > 0) {
                PosAns <- SolutionSearch(newmat,M,MyNum,myPrimes)
            } else {
                PosAns <- vector()
            }
        } else {
            newmat <- matrix(newmat, nrow = 1)
            PosAns <- vector()
        }
    } else {
        newmat <- matrix(integer(0),ncol=(LenFBase+1L))
        PosAns <- vector()
    }
    
    Atemp <- .mpfr2bigz(trunc(sqrt(sqrt(mpfr(2*MyNum))/maxM)))
    if (Atemp < max(facBase)) {Atemp <- max(facBase)}; myPoly <- 0L
    
    while (length(PosAns)==0L) {LegTest <- TRUE
        while (LegTest) {
            Atemp <- nextprime(Atemp)
            Legendre <- asNumeric(ExpBySquaringBig(MyNum,(Atemp-1L)/2,Atemp))
            if (Legendre == 1) {LegTest <- FALSE}
        }
    
        A <- Atemp^2
        Btemp <- max(TonelliShanks(MyNum, Atemp))
        B2 <- (Btemp + (MyNum - Btemp^2) * inv.bigz(2*Btemp,Atemp))%%A
        C <- as.bigz((B2^2 - MyNum)/A)
        myPoly <- myPoly + 1L
    
        polySieveD <- lapply(1:LenFBase, function(x) {
            AInv <- inv.bigz(A,facBase[x])
            asNumeric(c(((SieveDist[[x]][1]-B2)*AInv)%%facBase[x],
                        ((SieveDist[[x]][2]-B2)*AInv)%%facBase[x]))
        })
    
        M1 <- A*MyInterval + B2
        SqrDiff <- matrix(A*pow.bigz(MyInterval,2) + 2*B2*MyInterval + C,nrow=length(M1),ncol=1L)
        CoolList <- SieveLists(LenFBase, facBase, LenB2, polySieveD, MyInterval)
        myPrimes <- c(myPrimes,Atemp)
        LenP <- length(myPrimes)
        GetMatrix <- SieverMod(LenFBase, facBase, LenB2, SqrDiff, M1, CoolList, LnFB, TheCut, LenP+1L)
    
        if (GetMatrix[[4]]) {
            n2mat <- GetMatrix[[1]]; N2SD <- GetMatrix[[2]]; M1 <- GetMatrix[[3]]
            n2mat[,LenP+1L] <- rep(2L,nrow(N2SD))
            if (length(N2SD) > 0) {NonSplitFacs <- which(abs(N2SD[,1L])>1L)} else {NonSplitFacs <- LenB2}
            if (length(NonSplitFacs)<2*LenB) {
                M1 <- M1[-NonSplitFacs]; lenM1 <- length(M1)
                n2mat <- n2mat[-NonSplitFacs,]
                if (lenM1==1L) {n2mat <- matrix(n2mat,nrow=1)}
                if (ncol(newmat) < (LenP+1L)) {
                    numCol <- (LenP + 1L) - ncol(newmat)
                    newmat <-     cbind(newmat,matrix(rep(0L,numCol*nrow(newmat)),ncol=numCol))
                }
                newmat <- rbind(newmat,n2mat); lenM <- lenM+lenM1; M <- c(M,M1)
                if (class(newmat) == "matrix") {
                    if (nrow(newmat) > 0) {
                        PosAns <- SolutionSearch(newmat,M,MyNum,myPrimes)
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    
    EndTime <- Sys.time()
    TotTime <- EndTime - BegTime
    print(format(TotTime))
    return(PosAns)
}

With Old QS algorithm

> library(gmp)
> library(Rmpfr)

> n3 <- prod(nextprime(urand.bigz(2, 40, 17)))
> system.time(t5 <- QuadSieveAll(n3,0.1,myps))
  user  system elapsed 
164.72    0.77  165.63 
> system.time(t6 <- factorize(n3))
user  system elapsed 
0.1     0.0     0.1 
> all(t5[sort.list(asNumeric(t5))]==t6[sort.list(asNumeric(t6))])
[1] TRUE

With New Muli-Polynomial QS algorithm

> QuadSieveMultiPolysAll(n3)
[1] "4.952 secs"
Big Integer ('bigz') object of length 2:
[1] 342086446909 483830424611

> n4 <- prod(nextprime(urand.bigz(2,50,5)))
> QuadSieveMultiPolysAll(n4)   ## With old algo, it took over 4 hours
[1] "1.131717 mins"
Big Integer ('bigz') object of length 2:
[1] 166543958545561 880194119571287

> n5 <- as.bigz("94968915845307373740134800567566911")   ## 35 digits
> QuadSieveMultiPolysAll(n5)
[1] "3.813167 mins"
Big Integer ('bigz') object of length 2:
[1] 216366620575959221 438925910071081891

> system.time(factorize(n5))   ## It appears we are reaching the limits of factorize
   user  system elapsed 
 131.97    0.00  131.98

Side note: The number n5 above is a very interesting number. Check it out here

The Breaking Point!!!!

> n6 <- factorialZ(38) + 1L   ## 45 digits
> QuadSieveMultiPolysAll(n6)
[1] "22.79092 mins"
Big Integer ('bigz') object of length 2:
[1] 14029308060317546154181 37280713718589679646221

> system.time(factorize(n6))   ## Shut it down after 2 days of running

Latest Triumph (50 digits)

> n9 <- prod(nextprime(urand.bigz(2,82,42)))
> QuadSieveMultiPolysAll(n9)
[1] "12.9297 hours"
Big Integer ('bigz') object of length 2:
[1] 2128750292720207278230259 4721136619794898059404993

## Based off of some crude test, factorize(n9) would take more than a year.

It should be noted that the QS generally doesn't perform as well as the Pollard's rho algorithm on smaller numbers and the power of the QS starts to become apparent as the numbers get larger.

| improve this answer | |
7

The following approach deliver correct results, even in cases of really big numbers (which should be passed as strings). And it's really fast.

# TEST
# x <- as.bigz("12345678987654321")
# all_divisors(x)
# all_divisors(x*x)

# x <- pow.bigz(2,89)-1
# all_divisors(x)

library(gmp)
  options(scipen =30)

  sort_listz <- function(z) {
  #==========================
    z <- z[order(as.numeric(z))] # sort(z)
  } # function  sort_listz  


  mult_listz <- function(x,y) {
   do.call('c', lapply(y, function(i) i*x)) 
  } 


  all_divisors <- function(x) {
  #==========================  
  if (abs(x)<=1) return(x) 
  else {

    factorsz <- as.bigz(factorize(as.bigz(x))) # factorize returns up to
    # e.g. x= 12345678987654321  factors: 3 3 3 3 37 37 333667 333667

    factorsz <- sort_listz(factorsz) # vector of primes, sorted

    prime_factorsz <- unique(factorsz)
    #prime_ekt <- sapply(prime_factorsz, function(i) length( factorsz [factorsz==i]))
    prime_ekt <- vapply(prime_factorsz, function(i) sum(factorsz==i), integer(1), USE.NAMES=FALSE)
    spz <- vector() # keep all divisors 
    all <-1
    n <- length(prime_factorsz)
    for (i in 1:n) {
      pr <- prime_factorsz[i]
      pe <- prime_ekt[i]
      all <- all*(pe+1) #counts all divisors 

      prz <- as.bigz(pr)
      pse <- vector(mode="raw",length=pe+1) 
      pse <- c( as.bigz(1), prz)

      if (pe>1) {
        for (k in 2:pe) {
          prz <- prz*pr
          pse[k+1] <- prz
        } # for k
      } # if pe>1

      if (i>1) {
       spz <- mult_listz (spz, pse)         
      } else {
       spz <- pse;
      } # if i>1
    } #for n
    spz <- sort_listz (spz)

    return (spz)
  }  
  } # function  factors_all_divisors  

  #====================================

Refined version, very fast. Code remains simple, readable & clean.

TEST

#Test 4 (big prime factor)
x <- pow.bigz(2,256)+1 # = 1238926361552897 * 93461639715357977769163558199606896584051237541638188580280321
 system.time(z2 <- all_divisors(x))
#   user  system elapsed 
 #  19.27    1.27   20.56


 #Test 5 (big prime factor)
x <- as.bigz("12345678987654321321") # = 3 * 19 * 216590859432531953

 system.time(x2 <- all_divisors(x^2))
#user  system elapsed 
 #25.65    0.00   25.67  
| improve this answer | |
  • @JosephWood I updated my code, which is much - much faster now. (trivial cases are now satisfied). Thank you for your comments. – George Dontas Jan 20 '16 at 18:58
  • 2
    George,consider to REPLACE 'mult_listz <- function(x,y) { z <- x; for (j in 2:length(y)) { # y[1] == 1 z <- c(z,y[j] * x) } # for j return(z) }` WITH mult_listz <- function(x,y) { z <- do.call('c', lapply(y, function(i) i*x)) return (z) } ! (Inspired from Joseph's code). It will boost its performance! – user5821909 Jan 29 '16 at 8:05
  • @GeorgeDontas, also consider using prime_ekt <- vapply(prime_factorz, function(i) sum(factorz==i), integer(1), USE.NAMES=FALSE). It will speed your code up a bit. – Joseph Wood May 4 '16 at 3:57
7

Major Update

Below is my latest R factorization algorithm. It is way faster and pays homage to the rle function.

Algorithm 3 (Updated)

library(gmp)
MyFactors <- function(MyN) {
    myRle <- function (x1) {
        n1 <- length(x1)
        y1 <- x1[-1L] != x1[-n1]
        i <- c(which(y1), n1)
        list(lengths = diff(c(0L, i)), values = x1[i], uni = sum(y1)+1L)
    }

    if (MyN==1L) return(MyN)
    else {
        pfacs <- myRle(factorize(MyN))
        unip <- pfacs$values
        pv <- pfacs$lengths
        n <- pfacs$uni
        myf <- unip[1L]^(0L:pv[1L])
        if (n > 1L) {
            for (j in 2L:n) {
                myf <- c(myf, do.call(c,lapply(unip[j]^(1L:pv[j]), function(x) x*myf)))
            }
        }
    }
    myf[order(asNumeric(myf))]  ## 'order' is faster than 'sort.list'
}

Below are the new benchmarks (As Dirk Eddelbuettel says here, "Can't argue with empirics."):

Case 1 (large prime factors)

set.seed(100)
myList <- lapply(1:10^3, function(x) sample(10^6, 10^5))
benchmark(SortList=lapply(myList, function(x) sort.list(x)),
            OrderFun=lapply(myList, function(x) order(x)),
            replications=3,
            columns = c("test", "replications", "elapsed", "relative"))
      test replications elapsed relative
2 OrderFun            3   59.41    1.000
1 SortList            3   61.52    1.036

## The times are limited by "gmp::factorize" and since it relies on
## pseudo-random numbers, the times can vary (i.e. one pseudo random
## number may lead to a factorization faster than others). With this
## in mind, any differences less than a half of second
## (or so) should be viewed as the same. 
x <- pow.bigz(2,256)+1
system.time(z1 <- MyFactors(x))
user  system elapsed
14.94    0.00   14.94
system.time(z2 <- all_divisors(x))      ## system.time(factorize(x))
user  system elapsed                    ##  user  system elapsed
14.94    0.00   14.96                   ## 14.94    0.00   14.94 
all(z1==z2)
[1] TRUE

x <- as.bigz("12345678987654321321")
system.time(x1 <- MyFactors(x^2))
user  system elapsed 
20.66    0.02   20.71
system.time(x2 <- all_divisors(x^2))    ## system.time(factorize(x^2))
user  system elapsed                    ##  user  system elapsed
20.69    0.00   20.69                   ## 20.67    0.00   20.67
all(x1==x2)
[1] TRUE

Case 2 (smaller numbers)

set.seed(199)
samp <- sample(10^9, 10^5)
benchmark(JosephDivs=sapply(samp, MyFactors),
            DontasDivs=sapply(samp, all_divisors),
            OldDontas=sapply(samp, Oldall_divisors),
            replications=10,
            columns = c("test", "replications", "elapsed", "relative"),
            order = "relative")
        test replications elapsed relative
1 JosephDivs           10  470.31    1.000
2 DontasDivs           10  567.10    1.206  ## with vapply(..., USE.NAMES = FALSE)
3  OldDontas           10  626.19    1.331  ## with sapply

Case 3 (for complete thoroughness)

set.seed(97)
samp <- sample(10^6, 10^4)
benchmark(JosephDivs=sapply(samp, MyFactors),
            DontasDivs=sapply(samp, all_divisors),
            CottonDivs=sapply(samp, get_all_factors),
            ChaseDivs=sapply(samp, FUN),
            replications=5,
            columns = c("test", "replications", "elapsed", "relative"),
            order = "relative")
        test replications elapsed relative
1 JosephDivs            5   22.68    1.000
2 DontasDivs            5   27.66    1.220
3 CottonDivs            5  126.66    5.585
4  ChaseDivs            5  554.25   24.438


Original Post

The algorithm by @RichieCotton is a very nice R implementation. The brute force method will only get you so far and fails with large numbers. I have provided three algorithms that will meet different needs. The first one (is the original algorithm I posted in Jan 15 and has been updated slightly), is a stand-alone factorization algorithm which offers a combinatorial approach that is efficient, accurate, and can be easily translated into other languages. The second algorithm is more of a sieve that is very fast and extremely useful when you need the factorization of thousands of numbers quickly. The third is a short (posted above), yet powerful stand-alone algorithm that is superior for any number less than 2^70 (I scrapped almost everything from my original code). I drew inspiration from Richie Cotton's use of the plyr::count function (it inspired me to write my own rle function that has a very similar return as plyr::count), George Dontas's clean way of handling the trivial case (i.e. if (n==1) return(1)), and the solution provided by @Zelazny7 to a question I had regarding bigz vectors.

Algorithm 1 (original)

library(gmp)
factor2 <- function(MyN) {
    if (MyN == 1) return(1L)
    else {
        max_p_div <- factorize(MyN)
        prime_vec <- max_p_div <- max_p_div[sort.list(asNumeric(max_p_div))]
        my_factors <- powers <- as.bigz(vector())
        uni_p <- unique(prime_vec); maxp <- max(prime_vec)
        for (i in 1:length(uni_p)) {
            temp_size <- length(which(prime_vec == uni_p[i]))
            powers <- c(powers, pow.bigz(uni_p[i], 1:temp_size))
        }
        my_factors <- c(as.bigz(1L), my_factors, powers)
        temp_facs <- powers; r <- 2L
        temp_facs2 <- max_p_div2 <- as.bigz(vector())
        while (r <= length(uni_p)) {
            for (i in 1:length(temp_facs)) {
                a <- which(prime_vec >  max_p_div[i])
                temp <- mul.bigz(temp_facs[i], powers[a])
                temp_facs2 <- c(temp_facs2, temp)
                max_p_div2 <- c(max_p_div2, prime_vec[a])
            }
            my_sort <- sort.list(asNumeric(max_p_div2))
            temp_facs <- temp_facs2[my_sort]
            max_p_div <- max_p_div2[my_sort]
            my_factors <- c(my_factors, temp_facs)
            temp_facs2 <- max_p_div2 <- as.bigz(vector()); r <- r+1L
        }
    }
    my_factors[sort.list(asNumeric(my_factors))]
}

Algorithm 2 (sieve)

EfficientFactorList <- function(n) {
    MyFactsList <- lapply(1:n, function(x) 1)
    for (j in 2:n) {
        for (r in seq.int(j, n, j)) {MyFactsList[[r]] <- c(MyFactsList[[r]], j)}
    }; MyFactsList}

It gives the factorization of every number between 1 and 100,000 in less than 2 seconds. To give you an idea of the efficiency of this algorithm, the time to factor 1 - 100,000 using the brute force method takes close to 3 minutes.

system.time(t1 <- EfficientFactorList(10^5))
user  system elapsed 
1.04    0.00    1.05 
system.time(t2 <- sapply(1:10^5, MyFactors))
user  system elapsed 
39.21    0.00   39.23 
system.time(t3 <- sapply(1:10^5, all_divisors))
user  system elapsed 
49.03    0.02   49.05

TheTest <- sapply(1:10^5, function(x) all(t2[[x]]==t3[[x]]) && all(asNumeric(t2[[x]])==t1[[x]]) && all(asNumeric(t3[[x]])==t1[[x]]))
all(TheTest)
[1] TRUE



Final Thoughts

@Dontas’s original comment about factoring large numbers got me thinking, what about really really large numbers… like numbers greater than 2^200. You will see that whichever algorithm you choose on this page, they will all take a very long time because most of them rely on gmp::factorize which uses the Pollard-Rho algorithm. From this question, this algorithm is only reasonable for numbers less than 2^70. I am currently working on my own factorize algorithm which will implement the Quadratic Sieve, which should take all of these algorithms to the next level.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    It does not return correct results for big numbers. E.g. options(scipen =50); x <- as.bigz("12345678987654321"); factor2(x*x). It should return 225 factors and of course all must be odd. – George Dontas Jan 14 '16 at 7:56
  • @GeorgeDontas, thanks for pointing this out. It forced me to revisit my code and think it through. – Joseph Wood Jan 19 '16 at 3:17
  • 1
    Joseph, thank you for you attention. Check my revised code, which is much faster now. Of course, speed can be improved, but my first intention is the code to remain simple, readable & clean. – George Dontas Jan 20 '16 at 8:11
  • Also, I think that you should edit your post and correct "DontasDivs", according to the latest version of my code. Thank you. – George Dontas Jan 22 '16 at 20:49
  • @George, I will update as soon as possible... We have been iced in for the past couple of days (using my phone right now) – Joseph Wood Jan 23 '16 at 18:28
6

A lot has changed in the R language since this question was originally asked. In version 0.6-3 of the numbers package, the function divisors was included that is very useful for getting all of the factors of a number. It will meet the needs of most users, however if you are looking for raw speed or you are working with larger numbers, you will need an alternative method. I have authored two new packages (partially inspired by this question, I might add) that contain highly optimized functions aimed at problems just like this. The first one is RcppAlgos and the other is RcppBigIntAlgos (formerly called bigIntegerAlgos).

RcppAlgos

RcppAlgos contains two functions for obtaining divisors of numbers less than 2^53 - 1 : divisorsRcpp (a vectorized function for quickly obtaining the complete factorization of many numbers) & divisorsSieve (quickly generates the complete factorization over a range). First up, we factor many random numbers using divisorsRcpp:

library(gmp)  ## for all_divisors by @GeorgeDontas
library(RcppAlgos)
library(numbers)
options(scipen = 999)
set.seed(42)
testSamp <- sample(10^10, 10)

## vectorized so you can pass the entire vector as an argument
testRcpp <- divisorsRcpp(testSamp)
testDontas <- lapply(testSamp, all_divisors)

identical(lapply(testDontas, as.numeric), testRcpp)
[1] TRUE

And now, factor many numbers over a range using divisorsSieve:

system.time(testSieve <- divisorsSieve(10^13, 10^13 + 10^5))
 user  system elapsed 
0.240   0.006   0.246

system.time(testDontasSieve <- lapply((10^13):(10^13 + 10^5), all_divisors))
  user  system elapsed 
42.001   0.120  42.018 

identical(lapply(testDontasSieve, asNumeric), testSieve)
[1] TRUE

Both divisorsRcpp and divisorsSieve are nice functions that are flexible and efficient, however they are limited to 2^53 - 1.

RcppBigIntAlgos

The RcppBigIntAlgos package (formerly called bigIntegerAlgos prior to version 0.2.0) features two functions, divisorsBig & quadraticSieve, that are designed for very large numbers. They link directly to the C library gmp. For divisorsBig, we have:

library(RcppBigIntAlgos)
## testSamp is defined above... N.B. divisorsBig is not quite as
## efficient as divisorsRcpp. This is so because divisorsRcpp
## can take advantage of more efficient data types.
testBig <- divisorsBig(testSamp)

identical(testDontas, testBig)
[1] TRUE

And here are the benchmark as defined in my original post (N.B. MyFactors is replaced by divisorsRcpp and divisorsBig).

## Case 2
library(rbenchmark)
set.seed(199)
samp <- sample(10^9, 10^5)
benchmark(RcppAlgos=divisorsRcpp(samp),
          RcppBigIntAlgos=divisorsBig(samp),
          DontasDivs=lapply(samp, all_divisors),
          replications=10,
          columns = c("test", "replications", "elapsed", "relative"),
          order = "relative")

             test replications elapsed relative
1       RcppAlgos           10   5.282     1.00
2 RcppBigIntAlgos           10   8.769     1.66
3      DontasDivs           10 334.666    63.36

## Case 3
set.seed(97)
samp <- sample(10^6, 10^4)
benchmark(RcppAlgos=divisorsRcpp(samp),
          RcppBigIntAlgos=divisorsBig(samp),
          numbers=lapply(samp, divisors),      ## From the numbers package
          DontasDivs=lapply(samp, all_divisors),
          CottonDivs=lapply(samp, get_all_factors),
          ChaseDivs=lapply(samp, FUN),
          replications=5,
          columns = c("test", "replications", "elapsed", "relative"),
          order = "relative")

             test replications elapsed relative
1       RcppAlgos            5   0.085    1.000
2 RcppBigIntAlgos            5   0.225    2.647
3         numbers            5  12.847  151.141
4      DontasDivs            5  13.563  159.565
5      CottonDivs            5  60.790  715.176
6       ChaseDivs            5 286.085 3365.706

The next benchmarks demonstrate the true power of the underlying algorithm in the divisorsBig function. The number being factored is a power of 10, so the prime factoring step can almost be completely ignored (e.g. system.time(factorize(pow.bigz(10,30))) registers 0 on my machine). Thus, the difference in timing is due solely to how quickly the prime factors can be combined to produce all factors.

library(microbenchmark)
powTen <- pow.bigz(10,30)
microbenchmark(divisorsBig(powTen), all_divisors(powTen), unit = "relative")
Unit: relative
                 expr      min       lq    mean   median       uq      max neval
  divisorsBig(powTen)  1.00000  1.00000  1.0000  1.00000  1.00000  1.00000   100
 all_divisors(powTen) 27.85281 27.58795 30.0508 27.12949 28.16451 29.55593   100

## Negative numbers show an even greater increase in efficiency
negPowTen <- powTen * -1
microbenchmark(divisorsBig(negPowTen), all_divisors(negPowTen), unit = "relative")
Unit: relative
                    expr      min       lq     mean  median      uq      max neval
  divisorsBig(negPowTen)  1.00000  1.00000  1.00000  1.0000  1.0000  1.00000   100
 all_divisors(negPowTen) 35.38571 32.78114 32.36515 32.3184 31.4411 30.42294   100

quadraticSieve

Since the latest release (i.e. v 0.2.4), there has been a major overhaul of quadraticSieve. We had already made great strides moving from R to compiled code (around 50 times faster (v 0.1.x) than the R function above). In the latest version we have made massive gains in efficiency by using more efficient data structures, counting partially smooth numbers, and simplifying some code logic. I will leave you with a few demonstrations of quadraticSieve.

n5 <- as.bigz("94968915845307373740134800567566911")
system.time(print(quadraticSieve(n5)))
Big Integer ('bigz') object of length 2:
[1] 216366620575959221 438925910071081891
    user  system elapsed 
   0.102   0.000   0.101   ## original time was 3.813167 mins
                           ## or 228.8 seconds ~ 2260x slower
                           ##
                           ## N.B. v 0.1.2 took 4.175s

n9 <- prod(nextprime(urand.bigz(2, 82, 42)))
system.time(print(quadraticSieve(n9)))
Big Integer ('bigz') object of length 2:
[1] 2128750292720207278230259 4721136619794898059404993
    user   system  elapsed 
   2.723    0.009    2.731   ## original time was 12.9297 hours
                             ## or 46,547 seconds ~ 17,000x slower
                             ##
                             ## N.B. v 0.1.2 took 1013.184s

As you can see, quadraticSieve is much faster than the original QuadSieveMultiPolysAll, however there is still a lot of work yet to be done. There is on-going research to improve this function with the current goals of:

  1. Factoring n9 in less than a minute (Done as of v 0.2.x)
  2. Factoring 60 digit semi-primes in less than a minute (Done as of v 0.2.4 see below)
  3. Factoring RSA-79 in less than 5 minutes (See below... currently just under half an hour).
  4. Vectorizing quadraticSieve as well as integrating divisorsBig with quadraticSieve, as currently, it is restrained to the same algorithm that gmp::factorize utilizes (Done as of v 0.2.x)

Here is the 60 digit example:

semiPrime200bits <- prod(nextprime(urand.bigz(2, 100, 1729)))

nchar(as.character(semiPrime200bits))
[1] 60

quadraticSieve(semiPrime200bits, showStats=TRUE)

Summary Statistics for Factoring:
    394753378083444510740772455309612207212651808400888672450967

|        Time        | Complete | Polynomials |   Smooths  |  Partials  |
|--------------------|----------|-------------|------------|------------|
|      31s 81ms      |   100%   |     7709    |    1372    |    1697    |

Big Integer ('bigz') object of length 2:
[1] 514864663444011777835756770809 766712897798959945129214210063

And here is the RSA-79 example:

rsa79 <- as.bigz("7293469445285646172092483905177589838606665884410340391954917800303813280275279")

quadraticSieve(rsa79, showStats=TRUE)

Summary Statistics for Factoring:
    7293469445285646172092483905177589838606665884410340391954917800303813280275279

|        Time        | Complete | Polynomials |   Smooths  |  Partials  |
|--------------------|----------|-------------|------------|------------|
|    28m 21s 327ms   |   100%   |    122127   |    5384    |    6765    |

Big Integer ('bigz') object of length 2:
[1] 848184382919488993608481009313734808977  8598919753958678882400042972133646037727
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