26

What is lazy initialization. here is the code i got after search google.

class MessageClass
{
    public string Message { get; set; }

    public MessageClass(string message)
    {
        this.Message = message;
        Console.WriteLine("  ***  MessageClass constructed [{0}]", message);
    }
}

Lazy<MessageClass> someInstance = new Lazy<MessageClass>(
    () => new MessageClass("The message")
    );

why should i create object in this way....when actually we need to create object in this way......looking for answer.

61

The purpose of the Lazy feature in .NET 4.0 is to replace a pattern many developers used previously with properties. The "old" way would be something like

private MyClass _myProperty;

public MyClass MyProperty
{
    get
    {
        if (_myProperty == null)
        {
            _myProperty = new MyClass();
        }
        return _myProperty;
    }
}

This way, _myProperty only gets instantiated once and only when it is needed. If it is never needed, it is never instantiated. To do the same thing with Lazy, you might write

private Lazy<MyClass> _myProperty = new Lazy<MyClass>( () => new MyClass());

public MyClass MyProperty
{
    get
    {
        return _myProperty.Value;
    }
}

Of course, you are not restricted to doing things this way with Lazy, but the purpose is to specify how to instantiate a value without actually doing so until it is needed. The calling code does not have to keep track of whether the value has been instantiated; rather, the calling code just uses the Value property. (It is possible to find out whether the value has been instantiated with the IsValueCreated property.)

  • when MyProperty the property will be called...if the following line execute private Lazy<MyClass> _myProperty = new Lazy<MyClass>( () => new MyClass()); how property will be called.....i just do not understand because we need to call property always explicitly. – Mou Jun 21 '11 at 12:48
  • @user728750 I'm not quite sure I understand what you are asking. _myProperty is just a private instance variable. You could also initialize it in the constructor of the containing class (which might be better practice, actually). The use of the property is somewhat optional, but it abstracts away the .Value call that would otherwise be needed. – Andrew Jun 21 '11 at 12:52
  • Funny that this same thing can be accomplished in Scala with just lazy val MyProperty = new MyClass(). Too bad they never got around to releasing a Scala compiler for .Net. – sparebytes Apr 15 '13 at 18:43
  • 12
    Another huge advantage of Lazy is that its default overload is thread safe, that is, if multiple consumers of your object try to retrieve its value simultaneously when it is not set, the code you provide in the lazy initialization function will only execute once. – Jordan Rieger Dec 5 '13 at 18:30
9

"Lazy initialization occurs the first time the Lazy.Value property is accessed or the Lazy.ToString method is called.

Use an instance of Lazy to defer the creation of a large or resource-intensive object or the execution of a resource-intensive task, particularly when such creation or execution might not occur during the lifetime of the program."

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd642331.aspx

8

Check out msdn documentation over here : Lazy Initialization

Lazy initialization of an object means that its creation is deferred until it is first used. Lazy initialization is primarily used to improve performance, avoid wasteful computation, and reduce program memory requirements.

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