476

I know how to get an intersection of two flat lists:

b1 = [1,2,3,4,5,9,11,15]
b2 = [4,5,6,7,8]
b3 = [val for val in b1 if val in b2]

or

def intersect(a, b):
    return list(set(a) & set(b))
 
print intersect(b1, b2)

But when I have to find intersection for nested lists then my problems starts:

c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]

In the end I would like to receive:

c3 = [[13,32],[7,13,28],[1,6]]

Can you guys give me a hand with this?

Related

2
  • What would your intersection be for c1 intersect c2? Do you want to simply find if c1 is in c2? Or do you want to find all elements in c1 that appear anywhere in c2? Mar 13, 2009 at 13:59
  • Read this and play in the interpreter.
    – Pithikos
    Jan 20, 2015 at 10:40

21 Answers 21

896

You don't need to define intersection. It's already a first-class part of set.

>>> b1 = [1,2,3,4,5,9,11,15]
>>> b2 = [4,5,6,7,8]
>>> set(b1).intersection(b2)
set([4, 5])
9
  • 3
    Will this be slower than lambda because of conversion to set? Mar 26, 2014 at 4:33
  • 34
    @S.Lott, anything wrong with set(b1) & set(b2)? IMO its cleaner to use the operator.
    – jds
    Feb 19, 2015 at 23:18
  • 4
    Plus, using set will lead to code that's orders of magnitude faster. Here's a sample benchmark®: gist.github.com/andersonvom/4d7e551b4c0418de3160 Nov 25, 2015 at 15:33
  • 5
    Only works if the result doesn't have to be ordered.
    – Borbag
    Aug 17, 2017 at 10:40
  • 10
    So... this answer does in no way answer the question, right? Because this does now work with nested lists.
    – Mayou36
    Sep 6, 2017 at 17:21
179

If you want:

c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]
c3 = [[13, 32], [7, 13, 28], [1,6]]

Then here is your solution for Python 2:

c3 = [filter(lambda x: x in c1, sublist) for sublist in c2]

In Python 3 filter returns an iterable instead of list, so you need to wrap filter calls with list():

c3 = [list(filter(lambda x: x in c1, sublist)) for sublist in c2]

Explanation:

The filter part takes each sublist's item and checks to see if it is in the source list c1. The list comprehension is executed for each sublist in c2.

4
  • 35
    You can use filter(set(c1).__contains__, sublist) for efficiency. btw, the advantage of this solution is that filter() preserves strings and tuples types.
    – jfs
    Mar 14, 2009 at 10:46
  • 3
    i like this method, but i'm getting blank '' in my resulting list Dec 7, 2011 at 21:35
  • I added Python 3 compat here, since I am using this as a dupe target for a dupe of a Python 3 question May 29, 2016 at 5:01
  • 9
    This reads better IMO with nested comprehensions: c3 = [[x for x in sublist if x in c1] for sublist in c2]
    – Eric
    Aug 20, 2016 at 19:06
61

For people just looking to find the intersection of two lists, the Asker provided two methods:

b1 = [1,2,3,4,5,9,11,15]
b2 = [4,5,6,7,8]
b3 = [val for val in b1 if val in b2]

and

def intersect(a, b):
     return list(set(a) & set(b))

print intersect(b1, b2)

But there is a hybrid method that is more efficient, because you only have to do one conversion between list/set, as opposed to three:

b1 = [1,2,3,4,5]
b2 = [3,4,5,6]
s2 = set(b2)
b3 = [val for val in b1 if val in s2]

This will run in O(n), whereas his original method involving list comprehension will run in O(n^2)

3
  • As "if val in s2" runs in O(N), the proposed code snippet complexity is also O(n^2)
    – Unicorn
    Mar 21, 2013 at 7:42
  • 8
    The average case of "val in s2" is O(1) according to wiki.python.org/moin/TimeComplexity#set - thus over n operations the expected time is O(n) (whether the worst-case time is O(n) or O(n^2) depends on whether this average case represents an amortized time or not, but this isn't very important in practice). Nov 1, 2013 at 23:20
  • 2
    The runtime is O(N) not because it is amortized but because set membership is in average O(1) (for example when using hash table), it is big difference,for example because amortized time is guaranteed.
    – miroB
    Dec 4, 2017 at 20:27
30

The functional approach:

input_list = [[1, 2, 3, 4, 5], [2, 3, 4, 5, 6], [3, 4, 5, 6, 7]]

result = reduce(set.intersection, map(set, input_list))

and it can be applied to the more general case of 1+ lists

2
  • to allow empty input list: set(*input_list[:1]).intersection(*input_list[1:]). Iterator version (it = iter(input_list)): reduce(set.intersection, it, set(next(it, []))). Both version doesn't require to convert all input lists to set. The latter is more memory efficient.
    – jfs
    Dec 5, 2012 at 6:41
  • Use from functools import reduce to use it in Python 3. Or better yet, use an explicit for loop. Aug 2, 2016 at 8:51
27

Pure list comprehension version

>>> c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
>>> c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]
>>> c1set = frozenset(c1)

Flatten variant:

>>> [n for lst in c2 for n in lst if n in c1set]
[13, 32, 7, 13, 28, 1, 6]

Nested variant:

>>> [[n for n in lst if n in c1set] for lst in c2]
[[13, 32], [7, 13, 28], [1, 6]]
0
22

The & operator takes the intersection of two sets.

{1, 2, 3} & {2, 3, 4}
Out[1]: {2, 3}
3
  • Fine, but this topic is for lists!
    – Rafa0809
    May 5, 2017 at 0:37
  • 3
    The result of the intersection of two lists is a set so this answer is perfectly valid.
    – shrewmouse
    Jun 28, 2017 at 19:37
  • List can contain duplicate value but sets does not.
    – diewland
    Oct 31, 2018 at 9:27
14

A pythonic way of taking the intersection of 2 lists is:

[x for x in list1 if x in list2]
1
  • 2
    This question is about nested lists. Your answer does not answer the question.
    – Thomas
    Nov 18, 2019 at 12:19
8

You should flatten using this code ( taken from http://kogs-www.informatik.uni-hamburg.de/~meine/python_tricks ), the code is untested, but I'm pretty sure it works:


def flatten(x):
    """flatten(sequence) -> list

    Returns a single, flat list which contains all elements retrieved
    from the sequence and all recursively contained sub-sequences
    (iterables).

    Examples:
    >>> [1, 2, [3,4], (5,6)]
    [1, 2, [3, 4], (5, 6)]
    >>> flatten([[[1,2,3], (42,None)], [4,5], [6], 7, MyVector(8,9,10)])
    [1, 2, 3, 42, None, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]"""

    result = []
    for el in x:
        #if isinstance(el, (list, tuple)):
        if hasattr(el, "__iter__") and not isinstance(el, basestring):
            result.extend(flatten(el))
        else:
            result.append(el)
    return result

After you had flattened the list, you perform the intersection in the usual way:


c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]

def intersect(a, b):
     return list(set(a) & set(b))

print intersect(flatten(c1), flatten(c2))

1
  • 2
    That's a nice bit of flattening code Geo, but it doesn't answer the question. The asker specifically expects the result in the form [[13,32],[7,13,28],[1,6]].
    – Rob Young
    Jan 13, 2011 at 12:58
8

Since intersect was defined, a basic list comprehension is enough:

>>> c3 = [intersect(c1, i) for i in c2]
>>> c3
[[32, 13], [28, 13, 7], [1, 6]]

Improvement thanks to S. Lott's remark and TM.'s associated remark:

>>> c3 = [list(set(c1).intersection(i)) for i in c2]
>>> c3
[[32, 13], [28, 13, 7], [1, 6]]
5

Given:

> c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]

> c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]

I find the following code works well and maybe more concise if using set operation:

> c3 = [list(set(f)&set(c1)) for f in c2] 

It got:

> [[32, 13], [28, 13, 7], [1, 6]]

If order needed:

> c3 = [sorted(list(set(f)&set(c1))) for f in c2] 

we got:

> [[13, 32], [7, 13, 28], [1, 6]]

By the way, for a more python style, this one is fine too:

> c3 = [ [i for i in set(f) if i in c1] for f in c2]
3

Do you consider [1,2] to intersect with [1, [2]]? That is, is it only the numbers you care about, or the list structure as well?

If only the numbers, investigate how to "flatten" the lists, then use the set() method.

1
  • I'd like to leave the structure of the lists unchanged.
    – elfuego1
    Mar 13, 2009 at 13:49
3

I don't know if I am late in answering your question. After reading your question I came up with a function intersect() that can work on both list and nested list. I used recursion to define this function, it is very intuitive. Hope it is what you are looking for:

def intersect(a, b):
    result=[]
    for i in b:
        if isinstance(i,list):
            result.append(intersect(a,i))
        else:
            if i in a:
                 result.append(i)
    return result

Example:

>>> c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
>>> c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]
>>> print intersect(c1,c2)
[[13, 32], [7, 13, 28], [1, 6]]

>>> b1 = [1,2,3,4,5,9,11,15]
>>> b2 = [4,5,6,7,8]
>>> print intersect(b1,b2)
[4, 5]
0
1

I was also looking for a way to do it, and eventually it ended up like this:

def compareLists(a,b):
    removed = [x for x in a if x not in b]
    added = [x for x in b if x not in a]
    overlap = [x for x in a if x in b]
    return [removed,added,overlap]
1
  • If not using set.intersection then these simple one liners are what I would also do. May 19, 2017 at 15:08
1

To define intersection that correctly takes into account the cardinality of the elements use Counter:

from collections import Counter

>>> c1 = [1, 2, 2, 3, 4, 4, 4]
>>> c2 = [1, 2, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5]
>>> list((Counter(c1) & Counter(c2)).elements())
[1, 2, 4, 4, 4]
0
c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]

c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]

c3 = [list(set(c2[i]).intersection(set(c1))) for i in xrange(len(c2))]

c3
->[[32, 13], [28, 13, 7], [1, 6]]
0

We can use set methods for this:

c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]

   result = [] 
   for li in c2:
       res = set(li) & set(c1)
       result.append(list(res))

   print result
0
# Problem:  Given c1 and c2:
c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]
# how do you get c3 to be [[13, 32], [7, 13, 28], [1, 6]] ?

Here's one way to set c3 that doesn't involve sets:

c3 = []
for sublist in c2:
    c3.append([val for val in c1 if val in sublist])

But if you prefer to use just one line, you can do this:

c3 = [[val for val in c1 if val in sublist]  for sublist in c2]

It's a list comprehension inside a list comprehension, which is a little unusual, but I think you shouldn't have too much trouble following it.

0
c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]
c3 = [list(set(i) & set(c1)) for i in c2]
c3
[[32, 13], [28, 13, 7], [1, 6]]

For me this is very elegant and quick way to to it :)

0

flat list can be made through reduce easily.

All you need to use initializer - third argument in the reduce function.

reduce(
   lambda result, _list: result.append(
       list(set(_list)&set(c1)) 
     ) or result, 
   c2, 
   [])

Above code works for both python2 and python3, but you need to import reduce module as from functools import reduce. Refer below link for details.

0

Simple way to find difference and intersection between iterables

Use this method if repetition matters

from collections import Counter

def intersection(a, b):
    """
    Find the intersection of two iterables

    >>> intersection((1,2,3), (2,3,4))
    (2, 3)

    >>> intersection((1,2,3,3), (2,3,3,4))
    (2, 3, 3)

    >>> intersection((1,2,3,3), (2,3,4,4))
    (2, 3)

    >>> intersection((1,2,3,3), (2,3,4,4))
    (2, 3)
    """
    return tuple(n for n, count in (Counter(a) & Counter(b)).items() for _ in range(count))

def difference(a, b):
    """
    Find the symmetric difference of two iterables

    >>> difference((1,2,3), (2,3,4))
    (1, 4)

    >>> difference((1,2,3,3), (2,3,4))
    (1, 3, 4)

    >>> difference((1,2,3,3), (2,3,4,4))
    (1, 3, 4, 4)
    """
    diff = lambda x, y: tuple(n for n, count in (Counter(x) - Counter(y)).items() for _ in range(count))
    return diff(a, b) + diff(b, a)
0
-1
from random import *

a = sample(range(0, 1000), 100)
b = sample(range(0, 1000), 100)
print(a)
print(b)
print(set(a).intersection(set(b)))

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