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I'm a beginner in C programming and i would appreciate if i could get some tips on how to set a program to restart? I'm currently building a guessing game, where the user has 4 attempts to guess the secret number which is provided randomly. I have almost completed the code, but it does not run correctly and some of the things it returns are incorrect. Please help.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
int main() {
  int a, Thenumber, GuessNumber, NumberofTries = 4, theAnswer;
  time_t ti;
  printf("Welcome to the game. \nI am going to choose any number between 10 and 30");
  printf("\nYou must try to guess the number. If you guess incorrect, I will tell you if you were too high or too low");
  printf("\nYou will have 4 attempts to guess the number.\n"); 

  srand((unsigned)time(&ti));
  Thenumber = rand() % 1 + 3 + 1;//10+20+1;4

  for (NumberofTries = 0; NumberofTries < 4; NumberofTries++) {
    printf("\n \nPlease enter a number:");
    scanf("%d", &GuessNumber);
    if (GuessNumber > 30) {
      printf("That is illegal. Your number can only be between 10 and 30. Please enter a number between those numbers:/n");

    }
    else if (GuessNumber > Thenumber) {
      printf("I'm sorry, that is too high. \n");
    }
  }

  if (GuessNumber < Thenumber) {
    printf("I'm sorry, that is too low. \n");
  }

  else if (GuessNumber == Thenumber) {
    printf("You are correct. Do you want to continue playing? y-yes n-no:  \n");
    return 0;
  }

  printf("\n \nI'm sorry, you have no more attempts.\n \nDo you want to play again? y-yes n-no: \n");
  scanf("%d", &theAnswer);

  if ((theAnswer = 'n')) {
    printf("Goodbye, thank you for playing. Please play again soon.");
  }
  return 0;
}
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  • 2
    n = rand() % 1+3+1; is the same as n = (rand() % 1) + 4. It will always set n to 4. If you want a number between 10 and 30, it's n = rand() % 21 + 10; Oct 9 '20 at 22:08
  • 1
    I've fixed your indentation so that brackets alignment is clear. Your for loop ends before you finish checking the GuessNumber. Also, you return right after prompting for user input, before geeting that input. Oct 9 '20 at 22:15
  • 2
    The condition (theAnswer = 'n') looks weird.
    – MikeCAT
    Oct 9 '20 at 22:18
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The if-else statement that checks GuessNumber should be inside the for loop, not after it.

When you use return 0; in the main() method, your program will terminate, so you don't want to do that.

Try changing:

if ((theAnswer = 'n'))

to:

if ('n' == theAnswer)

since you want to compare, not assign. The double parentheses are not causing a logical error, but add clutter and reduce readability of your code.

4
  • 2
    This will get you the numbers from 0 to 4; @user3386109 posted the correct way in his first comment Oct 9 '20 at 22:17
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    @VladFeinstein indeed, removed!
    – gsamaras
    Oct 9 '20 at 22:20
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    You made the same typo as OP; to avoid those errors - I swapped the constant and variable (= would be an error now) Oct 9 '20 at 22:28
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    Possibly the double parentheses were an incorrect solution to the compiler warning about the assignment vs comparison issue. Before endeavoring to fix code to avoid warnings, one should always be sure that one understands the nature of the issue the compiler is warning about. Oct 9 '20 at 23:26
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I do not know if this solves your problem but here are couple of points:

srand(time(&ti));

you do not have to cast time() to unsigned, since you cannot get negative value for times after 1/1/1970.

I do not know what happens with your code, do not have compiler to test it, but you should ALWAYS initialize your variables, since you are invoking undefined behavior.

Another way of doing this is:

srand(time(null));

This will initialize random generator using current time on your machine.

Thenumber = rand() %  1+3+1;//10+20+1;

% has presidency over + thus rant()%1 always returns 0

1

Your input routine is horribly fragile. What happens if you do:

Please enter a number: twenty-one

Using scanf() a matching-failure occurs, character extraction from stdin ceases, and "twenty-one" is left in stdin unread just waiting to break your next input for the same reason.

Instead, all user-input should be done using a line-oriented input function such as fgets() or POSIX getline(). With a sufficiently sized buffer (character array) for input, fgets() will consume an entire line at a time (up to the size of the buffer -1 for the nul-terminating character). getline() will dynamically allocate a sufficient buffer to hold the entire line if the initial lineptr parameter is set to NULL and n = 0 see man 3 getline

Then you parse a numeric value from the buffer using sscanf() instead of attempting the read of user input with scanf(). As with all user-input functions and numeric conversion function you must validate the return to know whether the input, or conversion, succeeded or failed. This is NOT optional. Otherwise, you are inviting Undefined Behavior.

In order to prompt to "...continue playing?", you will require nested loops. A simple way to handle the game would be:

  while (choice == 'y') {
    /* generate random in range */
    for (tries = 0; tries < NTRIES; ) {
      /* handle your guesses */
      tries += 1;
    }
    /* prompt for continue playing? & read choice */
  }

(note: there is no increment in the for ( ; ; ) loop definition. You only increment the number of tries if the input was valid.)

When you use variables in C that have automatic storage duration (normal variables created on the program stack), any attempt to access their value before they are initialized (i.e. while their value is indeterminate), results in Undefined Behavior). Now your use of ti is okay, because you are not accessing its value in:

  srand((unsigned)time(&ti));

but instead using its address -- but I suspect that distinction was completely lost. Rule-of-thumb for new programmers -- initialize all values to avoid the potential for UB. For srand() seeding the random number generator can be done simply with:

  srand (time (NULL));

Your initialization of Thenumber does not result in a value between 10 - 30 inclusive. Instead, you need:

  Thenumber = rand() % (30 - 10 + 1);

Next, don't scatter Magic Numbers throughout your code. If you need a constant, #define it or use a global enum to do the same thing. For example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

#define NTRIES      4       /* if you need a constant, #define one (or more) */
#define MINNUM     10
#define MAXNUM     30
#define MAXC     1024

Then you you number generation becomes:

  Thenumber = rand() % (MAXNUM - MINNUM + 1);

That way if the number of tries changes, or you want to change the range of your game -- you don't have to go picking through every loop limit and conditional statement to make the change. You simply change the constant that is conveniently defined at the top of your code.

When you are presenting output to the users, there is no need to use the variadic printf() function if there are no conversions involved in your output. You can simply use puts() if you are outputting text and want a trailing '\n', or fputs() if you need end-of-line control (like when asking a question and you do not want a '\n' output). Regardless, for any one output you do not need more than ONE call to an output function, e.g.

  printf ("Welcome to the game.\n\n"                    /* a single printf will do */
          "I am going to choose any number between %d and %d\n\n"
          "You must try to guess the number. If you guess incorrect, I will tell you\n"
          "if you were too high or too low. You will have %d attempts to guess the "
          "number.\n", MINNUM, MAXNUM, NTRIES);

Next, you need a systematic way to check whether the user:

  1. Has guess the correct number, (this can be the first conditional check as the round is over if he has)
  2. If the user's guess was out-of-range,
  3. If the guess was less than the number, or finally
  4. If the guess was greater than the number.

You can write that logic similar to:

      if (guess == number) {                            /* winner! */
        puts ("\n  Correct!");
        goto again;
      }
      else if (guess < MINNUM || MAXNUM < guess) {      /* guess out-of-range */
        printf ("\n  guess out of range, allowed %d - %d\n", MINNUM, MAXNUM);
        continue;
      }
      else if (guess < number) {                        /* guess < number */
        fputs ("\n  I'm sorry, that was too low.\n", stdout);
      }
      else {                                            /* guess > number */
        fputs ("\n  I'm sorry, that was too high.\n", stdout);
      }

(again -- there are no Magic Numbers in any of the limits)

It is obvious that you got stuck when you got to the part about loop control for asking the user to play again. You will have your outer loop controlling the choice to continue and the inner loop is one full game. The only commingling between the inner and outer will be an optional choice of whether you add another else if (tries == NTRIES) to the conditional above and handle the out-of-tries case within the inner loop, or if you allow normal loop control in your for (tries = 0; tries < NTRIES; ) to control the out-of-tries case and then provide that information to the user after the inner loop completes. That is up to you.

Putting it altogether you could do:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

#define NTRIES      4       /* if you need a constant, #define one (or more) */
#define MINNUM     10
#define MAXNUM     30
#define MAXC     1024

int main() {
  
  char buf[MAXC] = "y";                                 /* array to hold user-input */
  int guess, number, tries;                             /* 3 int variables */
  
  printf ("Welcome to the game.\n\n"                    /* a single printf will do */
          "I am going to choose any number between %d and %d\n\n"
          "You must try to guess the number. If you guess incorrect, I will tell you\n"
          "if you were too high or too low. You will have %d attempts to guess the "
          "number.\n", MINNUM, MAXNUM, NTRIES);

  srand (time(NULL));                                   /* Using NULL is fine */
  
  while (*buf == 'y') {                                 /* test choice */
    number = MINNUM + rand() % (MAXNUM - MINNUM + 1);   /* rand() 10 - 30 (inclusive) */
  
    for (tries = 0; tries < NTRIES; ) {                 /* do not increment */
      fputs ("\nenter a number: ", stdout);             /* no conversion, fputs() */
        
      if (fgets (buf, MAXC, stdin) == NULL) {           /* validate every input */
        fputs ("(user canceled input)\n", stdout);
        return 0;
      }
        
      if (sscanf (buf, "%d", &guess) != 1) {            /* validate every conversion */
        fputs ("error: invalid integer.\n", stderr);
        continue;
      }
      
      if (guess == number) {                            /* winner! */
        puts ("\n  Correct!");
        goto again;
      }
      else if (guess < MINNUM || MAXNUM < guess) {      /* guess out-of-range */
        printf ("\n  guess out of range, allowed %d - %d\n", MINNUM, MAXNUM);
        continue;
      }
      else if (guess < number) {                        /* guess < number */
        fputs ("\n  I'm sorry, that was too low.\n", stdout);
      }
      else {                                            /* guess > number */
        fputs ("\n  I'm sorry, that was too high.\n", stdout);
      }
      
      tries += 1;       /* increment only if not continued due to error in input */
    }
    
    printf ("\n\n%d tries exhaused, the number was '%d'.\n", NTRIES, number);
    
  again:;
    
    fputs ("\n\nplay again (y/n)? ", stdout);
    if (fgets (buf, MAXC, stdin) == NULL) {
      fputs ("(user canceled input)\n", stdout);
      return 0;
    }
  }
  
  /* no conversion involved and appended '\n' wanted -- use puts() */
  puts ("\nGoodbye, thank you for playing. Please play again soon.");
}

(note: the design choice above uses a simple goto to jump past the out-of-tries code when a successful guess is made, leaving the for loop to control the out-of-tries logic rather than adding another else if -- entirely up to you. Write it both ways and compare the difference)

Lastly, while not an error, C generally avoids the use of camelCase or MixedCase variable and function names in favor of all lower-case while reserving upper-case names for use with macros and constants. It is a matter of style -- so it is completely up to you, but failing to follow it can lead to the wrong first impression in some circles.

Example Use/Output

Your input must handle anything the user can enter (or the cat stepping on the keyboard):

$ ./bin/guessnumber
Welcome to the game.

I am going to choose any number between 10 and 30

You must try to guess the number. If you guess incorrect, I will tell you
if you were too high or too low. You will have 4 attempts to guess the number.

enter a number: twenty-one
error: invalid integer.

enter a number: 3

  guess out of range, allowed 10 - 30

enter a number: 33

  guess out of range, allowed 10 - 30

enter a number: 20 okay, okay, okay!!!

  I'm sorry, that was too high.

enter a number: 15

  Correct!


play again (y/n)? y
...

Choosing play again must generate a new number are reset all values:

enter a number: 20

  I'm sorry, that was too low.

enter a number: 25

  I'm sorry, that was too low.

enter a number: 28

  I'm sorry, that was too high.

enter a number: 27

  I'm sorry, that was too high.


4 tries exhaused, the number was '26'.


play again (y/n)? n

Goodbye, thank you for playing. Please play again soon.

When you write an input routine -- go try and break it. Enter as many funny values as you can and see if it handles it correctly. If it doesn't -- go fix it and try again. User input must be bullet-proof... because users will do the stupidest of things with your code. Make sure it can handle it.

Also notice if the test on fgets() fails, then "(user canceled input)" is displayed. That is because the user can generate a manual EOF using Ctrl + d (or Ctrl + z on windows). In that case, it isn't an error, the user has simply chosen to cancel input -- so it should be handled with a graceful program exit at that point.

There is a lot to digest. Look it over and let me know if you have further questions. Learning C isn't a race, it's a journey -- slow down, understand every character you use in each line and -- enjoy the journey.

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