36

Is it possible to put a [Required] attribute onto a List<> property?

I bind to a generic list on POST and was wondering if I could make ModelState.IsValid() fail if the property has 0 items in it?

1
  • If you change your model to use an array instead of a List you can use the MinLengthAttribute
    – janv8000
    Commented Apr 22, 2015 at 14:44

4 Answers 4

36

Adding the Required attribute to a list-style property doesn't really do what you want. The will complain if the list isn't created, but won't complain if the list exists with 0 item in it.

However, it should be easy enough to derive your own data annotations attribute and make it check the list for Count > 0. Something like this (not tested yet):

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
public sealed class CannotBeEmptyAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    private const string defaultError = "'{0}' must have at least one element.";
    public CannotBeEmptyAttribute ( ) : base(defaultError) //
    { 
    }

    public override bool IsValid ( object value )
    {
      IList list = value as IList;
      return ( list != null && list.Count > 0 );
    }

    public override string FormatErrorMessage ( string name )
    {
        return String.Format(this.ErrorMessageString, name);
    }
}

EDIT:

You'll also have to be careful how you bind your list in your view. For example, if you bind a List<String> to a view like this:

<input name="ListName[0]" type="text" />
<input name="ListName[1]" type="text" />
<input name="ListName[2]" type="text" />
<input name="ListName[3]" type="text" />
<input name="ListName[4]" type="text" />

The MVC model binder will always put 5 elements in your list, all String.Empty. If this is how your View works, your attribute would need to get a bit more complex, such as using Reflection to pull the generic type parameter and comparing each list element with default(T) or something.

A better alternative is to use jQuery to create the input elements dynamically.

3
  • I don't suppose you could elaborate on that edit?
    – Sinjai
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 21:56
  • I'm not sure what edit you're asking about... your link just goes to a question. Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 22:53
  • Yeah, the question is (potentially -- that's partially what I'm asking) related.
    – Sinjai
    Commented Jul 20, 2017 at 1:45
29

For those who're looking for minimalist examples:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
public sealed class CannotBeEmptyAttribute : RequiredAttribute
{
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        var list = value as IEnumerable;
        return list != null && list.GetEnumerator().MoveNext();
    }
}

This is modified code from the accepted answer. It is suitable in the case from the question, and in even more cases, since IEnumerable is higher in System.Collections hierarchy. Additionally, it inherits behavior from RequiredAttribute, so no need in coding it explicitly.

4
  • The most Generic solution, Thanks!
    – Ankit Rana
    Commented Sep 1, 2017 at 9:53
  • Smart answer but not friendly with front-end validation
    – clement
    Commented Dec 6, 2019 at 15:44
  • 3
    one improvement is to also call base.IsValid(value) as well so that base class behavior is maintained. For C# 8's users, this can be as simple as return base.IsValid(value) && value is IEnumerable seq && seq.GetEnumerator().MoveNext();
    – rexcfnghk
    Commented May 20, 2020 at 5:21
  • Add "using System.Collections;" if compiler is complaining.
    – jBelanger
    Commented Nov 7, 2023 at 14:46
6

For those that use C# 6.0 (and above) and who are looking for one-liners:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
public sealed class CannotBeEmptyAttribute : RequiredAttribute
{
    public override bool IsValid(object value) => (value as IEnumerable)?.GetEnumerator().MoveNext() ?? false;
}
1
  • 3
    You mean five-liner? :-) Commented May 14, 2021 at 1:53
3

Modified @moudrick implementation for my requirement

Required Validation Attribute for List and checkbox List

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
public sealed class CustomListRequiredAttribute : RequiredAttribute
{
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        var list = value as IEnumerable;
        return list != null && list.GetEnumerator().MoveNext();
    }
}

If you have checkbox list

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
public sealed class CustomCheckBoxListRequiredAttribute : RequiredAttribute
{
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        bool result = false;

        var list = value as IEnumerable<CheckBoxViewModel>;
        if (list != null && list.GetEnumerator().MoveNext())
        {
            foreach (var item in list)
            {
                if (item.Checked)
                {
                    result = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        return result;
    }
}

Here is my View Model

public class CheckBoxViewModel
{        
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public bool Checked { get; set; }
}

Usage

[CustomListRequiredAttribute(ErrorMessage = "Required.")]
public IEnumerable<YourClass> YourClassList { get; set; }

[CustomCheckBoxListRequiredAttribute(ErrorMessage = "Required.")]
public IEnumerable<CheckBoxViewModel> CheckBoxRequiredList { get; set; }

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