0
  1. I am mostly looking for feedback on F# idiom and style since I'm just starting out and I'm trying to teach myself. It's never too early to start to adopt best practices.
  2. What are ";;" used for?
  3. Why do functions and expressions in my script.fsx file sometimes seem to need ";;"es (I get syntax errors if the the double semicolons aren't there), and sometimes don't?
  4. In the code below, function test is simply an initial condition guard to test2, which strikes me as inelegant. How could I combine them both into one function? Would there be a reason to try to combine test and test2 into a single function?
  5. main's paramenter argv isn't used here. Can it be deleted?
  6. main is basically a unit test for all the little functions. Is there a more efficient or elegant way to unit test F# code?
  7. Can you put blank lines in a function to improve readability?
open System



(* 
2.6 Declare the F# function notDivisible: int * int −> bool where 

notDivisible(d, n) is true iff and only if d is not a divisor of n.

For example notDivisible(2, 5) is true, and notDivisible(3, 9) is false.

Hansen, Michael R.. 
    Functional Programming Using F# (pp. 39-40). 
    Cambridge University Press. Kindle Edition. 
*)


let divisible d n = (0 = n % d);;

let notDivisible d n = not (divisible d n);;


(* 
2.7 

2.7.1 Declare the F# function test: int * int * int -> bool. The value of test(a, b, c), 
for a ≤ b, is the truth value of:  

    notDivisible(a, c) and
    notDivisible(a + 1, c) and
    .
    .
    .
    notDivisible(b, c)

2.7.2 Declare an F# function prime: int -> bool, where prime(n) = true, 
if and only if n is a prime number. 

2.7.3 Declare an F# function nextPrime: int -> int, 
where nextPrime(n) is the smallest prime number > n.

Hansen, Michael R.. 
    Functional Programming Using F# (p. 40). 
    Cambridge University Press. Kindle Edition. 
*)



let rec test2 a  b  c = 
    if (a <= b) 
    then (notDivisible b c) && (test2 a  (b - 1) c) 
    else true

let test a b c = (a <= b) && (test2 a b c)

let prime n = (n = 2) || ((n > 2) && (test 2 (n - 1) n))

let rec nextPrime n =
    if (prime (n + 1))
    then (n + 1)
    else nextPrime (n + 1)



[<EntryPoint>]
let main argv =
    printfn "divisible %d %d: expect %b, get %b" 2 5 false (divisible 2 5)
    printfn "divisible %d %d: expect %b, get %b" 3 9 true (divisible 3 9)
    printfn "-------------------------------------------------------------------------------"
    printfn "not(divisible %d %d): expect %b, get %b" 2 5 true (not(divisible 2 5))
    printfn "-------------------------------------------------------------------------------"
    printfn "notDivisible %d %d: expect %b, get %b" 2 5 true (notDivisible 2 5)
    printfn "notDivisible %d %d: expect %b, get %b" 3 9 false (notDivisible 3 9)
    printfn "notDivisible %d %d: expect %b, get %b" 1 1 false (notDivisible 1 1)
    printfn "-------------------------------------------------------------------------------"
    printfn "test %d %d %d: expected %b, get %b" 1 1 1 false (test 1 1 1) // false
    printfn "test %d %d %d: expected %b, get %b" 2 3 4 false (test 2 3 4) // false
    printfn "test %d %d %d: expected %b, get %b" 2 1 1 false (test 2 1 1) // false
    printfn "test %d %d %d: expected %b, get %b" 2 2 6 false (test 2 2 6) // false
    printfn "test %d %d %d: expected %b, get %b" 2 3 6 false (test 2 3 6) // false
    printfn "test %d %d %d: expected %b, get %b" 2 1 2 false (test 2 1 2) // false
    printfn "test %d %d %d: expected %b, get %b" 2 2 3 true (test 2 2 3) // true
    printfn "test %d %d %d: expected %b, get %b" 2 4 5 true (test 2 4 5) // true
    printfn "-------------------------------------------------------------------------------"
    printfn "prime %d: expect %b, get %b" -1 false (prime -1) // false
    printfn "prime %d: expect %b, get %b" 0 false (prime 0) // false
    printfn "prime %d: expect %b, get %b" 1 false (prime 1) // false
    printfn "prime %d: expect %b, get %b" 2 true (prime 2) // true
    printfn "prime %d: expect %b, get %b" 3 true (prime 3) // true
    printfn "prime %d: expect %b, get %b" 4 false (prime 4) // false
    printfn "prime %d: expect %b, get %b" 5 true (prime 5) // true
    printfn "prime %d: expect %b, get %b" 6 false (prime 6) // false
    printfn "-------------------------------------------------------------------------------"
    printfn "nextPrime %d : expcected, %d, get %d" -1 2 (nextPrime -1) // 2, 2
    printfn "nextPrime %d : expcected, %d, get %d" 0 2 (nextPrime 0) // 2, 2
    printfn "nextPrime %d : expcected, %d, get %d" 1 2 (nextPrime 1) // 2, 2
    printfn "nextPrime %d : expcected, %d, get %d" 2 3 (nextPrime 2) // 3, 3
    printfn "nextPrime %d : expcected, %d, get %d" 3 5 (nextPrime 3) // 5, 5
    printfn "nextPrime %d : expcected, %d, get %d" 4 5 (nextPrime 4) // 5, 5
    printfn "nextPrime %d : expcected, %d, get %d" 5 7 (nextPrime 5) // 7, 7
    printfn "nextPrime %d : expcected, %d, get %d" 6 7 (nextPrime 6) // 7, 7
    printfn "nextPrime %d : expcected, %d, get %d" 7 11 (nextPrime 7) // 11, 11
    //
    0 // return an integer exit code
1
  • 1
    ;; is needed at the end of each expression when typing directly into FSI. But I recommend that you never type directly into FSI. Just send code to it (with Alt-Enter usually) and then you never need to use ;;. There are many other advantages too. – TheQuickBrownFox Oct 10 '20 at 8:17
1

There are two ways of working with F# - compiling an assembly with fsc (.fs files) and writing a script file to be executed with fsi. Bear with me if I'm stating the obvious, it will be relevant later.

Usually when you write a script, you're executing the code as you go, experimenting with it and capturing the results of a REPL session for later. That's where the ;; that are purely an fsi usage artifacts come from (as described in a comment).

One side effect of this REPL based approach is that the shape of things you have in the script may end up reflecting the path of how the implementer got there more than deliberate design, and as scripts are more of a throwaway thing, that is often acceptable. That's how the code might have evolved to have a test2 function with only a single usage - it's an ok idea to roll test and test2 together, and while I might recommend doing that if they're part of some reusable library and test2 has no clear usage scenarios on its own other than being part of test, I don't think it necessarily matters here.

The main function that you have at the end of the file however is an entry point to a console application - so the compiled way of working with F# - and really has no place and special meaning in a script. I believe it was just pasted over and left there for no obvious reason.

[<EntryPoint>]
let main argv =
    0

You could just drop that and execute all those lines directly within the script.

You can test F# code using all the standard unit testing frameworks you have for .NET, but that's more of a use case for the compiled assembly path. Scripts are not unit-testable this way, and you'd test them interactively or through inline tests like the ones you have.

1
  • How would I roll test and test2 into one function? I do not know how to do that yet. – trent-AZ Oct 13 '20 at 15:14

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.