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Microsoft's documentation for msiexec says this:

/lv Turns on logging and includes verbose output in the output log file.

/l* Turns on logging and logs all information, except verbose information (/lv) or extra debugging information (/lx).

Examples

To install package C:\example.msi, using a normal installation process with all logging information provided, including verbose output, and storing the output log file at C:\package.log, type:

msiexec.exe /i "C:\example.msi" /L*V "C:\package.log"

I think it might help to have an example installer log. What is 'all logging information' (/L*V) vs 'verbose logging' (/LV)? Isn't verbose just that & historically shows all logging info? Guessing this is going to be a unique Microsoft thing

2 Answers 2

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Debug Logging (Verbose): Advanced, slow logging for maximum details captured. This is - as far as I can tell - the most information you can capture in an MSI log:

msiexec.exe /i C:\Path\Your.msi /L*vx! C:\Your.log

Interpreting MSI logs: MSI log files can be very verbose indeed. Advanced installer and an old blog from the MSI team of many years ago have a few clues to their content:

This old dialog from a log-command generation tool might help. The flush to log means the log is written directly and continuously and not in batches. This continuous writing slows things down a lot, but no log buffer is lost if there is a crash:

Generate MSI command line


WiLogUtl.exe: The Windows SDK contains this tool to analyze MSI log files. It can be helpful, although it is quite old-fashioned to look at GUI-wise. Search for it under: C:\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits - if you have Visual Studio or the Windows SDK installed. Here is a screen shot:

WiLogUtl.exe


Some pre-existing answers on logging:

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The /l switch takes a bunch of switches, each of which identifies particular items to log and is independent of the others. Likewise, v indicates a particular set of items to be logged; it's not a generic verbose logging level.

/l* says include all the switches except for v and x so it's equivalent to /loicewarmup. /l*vx includes all the switches and adds v and x to get everything.

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  • Do you mean /voicewarmup with a V? Can you explain what that is, this appears to be an article you can link. Guessing its telling Windows to log ALL .MSI installs vs telling msiexec to log THIS install file?
    – gregg
    Oct 14, 2020 at 13:45
  • No, the logging switch always starts with /l. Logging policy applies to all installs; the /l switch applies to one install.
    – Bob Arnson
    Oct 14, 2020 at 15:25

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