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When I try to run following code I get a segmentation fault:

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class HashTable {
    private:
        vector<list<pair<string,string>>> values;
        int cap;
        int r = 31;
    public:
        HashTable(int capacity) {
            cap = capacity;
            values.reserve(cap);
        }
        int hashKey(string str) {
            int hash = 0;
            for (int i=0; i<str.size();i++) {
                hash = (r*hash+(int)str[i])%cap;
            }
            return hash;
        }
        void put(string key, string value) {
            pair<string, string > p(key,value);
            values[hashKey(key)].push_back(p);
        }
        string get(string key) {
            list<pair<string,string>> valList = values[hashKey(key)];
            if (!valList.empty()) {
                for (list<pair<string, string>>::iterator it = valList.begin(); it != valList.end(); it++) {
                    if (it->first == key) {
                        return it->second;
                    }
                }
            }
            return "";
        }
        bool exists(string str) {
            return get(str).empty() ? false : true;
        }
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    HashTable ht(3) ;
    ht.put("1234", "325436");
    ht.put("gdsgsd", "woqweoqwpe");
    ht.put("Mrau", "Bau");
    cout << ht.get("1234") << endl;
    cout << ht.get("gdsgsd") << endl;
    cout << ht.get("Mrau") << endl;

    return 0;
}

When I debug it in GDB I get this:

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x00007ffff7e87913 in std::__detail::_List_node_base::_M_hook (this=0x55555556df00, __position=0x55555556deb0)
    at /build/gcc/src/gcc/libstdc++-v3/src/c++98/list.cc:132
132 /build/gcc/src/gcc/libstdc++-v3/src/c++98/list.cc: No such file or directory.

I really don't get this error. As far as I know list is part of C++ standard library. I can use other data structures from standard library (e.g. vector, map) just fine. As a matter of fact, when I modify the code above to remove the list and use vector exclusively, it works as expected.

Any ideas why is that the case? Is my gcc installation somehow corrupted? I tried to reinstall it but the issue persists (I install it as a gcc pacman package on arch linux).

I don't know if that's helpful but I included gdb backtrace below:

#0  0x00007ffff7e87913 in std::__detail::_List_node_base::_M_hook (this=0x55555556df00, __position=0x55555556dec8)
    at /build/gcc/src/gcc/libstdc++-v3/src/c++98/list.cc:132
#1  0x00005555555567c5 in std::__cxx11::list<std::pair<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, 
std::allocator<std::pair<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > > >::_M_insert<std::pair<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, 
std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > const&> (this=0x55555556dec8, __position={first = "", second = <error: Cannot access memory at address 0x61>})
    at /usr/include/c++/10.2.0/bits/stl_list.h:1912
#2  0x0000555555556216 in std::__cxx11::list<std::pair<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >, 
std::allocator<std::pair<std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::__cxx11::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > > > >::push_back (
    this=0x55555556dec8, __x={...}) at /usr/include/c++/10.2.0/bits/stl_list.h:1212
#3  0x0000555555555c74 in HashTable::put (this=0x7fffffffe120, key="1234", value="325436") at main.cpp:26
#4  0x000055555555533b in main (argc=1, argv=0x7fffffffe298) at main.cpp:47

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    At first glance, it looks like you really want resize where you've called reserve. That may not fix all your problems, but it at least provides a reasonable explanation for what you're currently seeing. – Jerry Coffin Oct 15 '20 at 21:55
  • Wow - that actually solved the problem! Can you provide some broader explanation why that worked? What resize vs reserve has to do with list.cc not being found lol?! (btw if you post an answer I will mark it as a solution) – Stargarth Oct 15 '20 at 22:02
  • reserve is mosty advice: "I think this is likely to get this big". But it does not actually set the container's size, so you still can't address elements in the collection. resize actually creates that number of elements in your collection, so reading/writing them should work. – Jerry Coffin Oct 15 '20 at 22:06
  • Alright, but is there anything that could tie that to error message? What does it have to do with "list.cc no such file or directory"? I'd expect "can't access memory at address" or something along those lines. – Stargarth Oct 15 '20 at 22:21
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    Your code fails, so the debugger is trying to bring up the source code for the location of the failure, which (in this case) is list.cc, the implementation of std::list. You apparently don't have that installed, so the debugger fails to display it. This fixes it by not failing, so the debugger never looks for that file in the first place. – Jerry Coffin Oct 15 '20 at 22:45
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Jerry Coffin has solved this problem:

At first glance, it looks like you really want resize where you've called reserve. That may not fix all your problems, but it at least provides a reasonable explanation for what you're currently seeing.

I changed values.reserve to values reserve.resize

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