3

Suppose I have a image like this:

original image

Each square is a pixel. They are white or red.

I want to draw a green outline around the red region given an outline width w.

I tried some algorithms but the result isn't looking good, the diagonals look strange and don't reflect the original image:

my result

What approach should I use to get a smoother and better result with a good performance?

For simplicity, suppose I have a point p that belongs to the boundary.

5

Here is a solution using JavaScript:

var matrix=[
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
];

function createMatrixDivs() {
  for(var r=0; r<16; r++) {
    for(var c=0; c<16; c++) {
      var cell=document.createElement("div");
      cell.style="border:1px solid blue;position:absolute;width:10px;height:10px;left:"+10*c+"px;top:"+10*r+"px;";
      cell.id=r+","+c;
      document.body.append(cell);
    }
  }
}

function drawMatrixDivs() {
  for(var r=0; r<16; r++) {
    for(var c=0; c<16; c++) {
      document.getElementById(r+","+c).style.backgroundColor=(matrix[r][c]==0?"white":matrix[r][c]==1?"red":matrix[r][c]==2?"green":"gray");
    }
  }
}

function outline(w) {
  for(var r1=0; r1<16; r1++) {
    for(var c1=0; c1<16; c1++) {
      if(matrix[r1][c1]==0) {
        for(var r2=0; r2<16; r2++) {
          for(var c2=0; c2<16; c2++) {
            if(r2!=r1 && c2!=c1 && matrix[r2][c2]==1 && Math.round(Math.sqrt(Math.pow(r2-r1,2)+Math.pow(c2-c1,2)))<=w) {
              matrix[r1][c1]=2;
            }
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
  drawMatrixDivs();
}

createMatrixDivs();
drawMatrixDivs();
outline(+prompt("Enter outline width: "));

16
  • The result looks great. Could you say a little bit about the complexity? It seems to me it runs in O(n^4) but I'm looking for something way smaller.
    – Daniel
    Oct 16 '20 at 2:14
  • Thanks! Well, VERY complex... O(n^4)? Where n is the width or height, which are the same = 16... Meaning - yes, you are correct...
    – iAmOren
    Oct 16 '20 at 2:16
  • I notice you've up-voted, can you accept as well? Thank you!
    – iAmOren
    Oct 16 '20 at 2:17
  • I upvoted because of your efforts and good looking result, but in the question I asked for a good performance algorithm. This task will run in a mobile application and I cannot afford an O(n^4) algorithm, since my textures will not be 16x16 xD
    – Daniel
    Oct 16 '20 at 2:20
  • 1
    @Metabolic, thank you! (and for the up-vote - I'm guessing one of them was you)
    – iAmOren
    Nov 2 '20 at 11:43
4

Your green outline shows the pixels that are <= w pixels away from the red ones, as measured using manhattan distance.

You want the pixels that are <= w pixels away from the red ones, as measured using Euclidean distance.

It's a little tricky, but you can actually do this in linear (O(width*height)) time.

PASS1: make a new matrix M[y][x] gives the vertical distance from (x,y) to a red pixel, or w+1 if the distance is more than w. You can do this in linear time by scanning up and then down through each column.

PASS2: scan from left to right in each row. Where M[y][x] <= w, you can color pixel (x,y) green, along with the sqrt(w2-M[y][x]2) pixels to the right. remember how far right you've colored, and avoid recoloring pixels you've already done, so this process will take linear time, too. Do the same thing scanning from right to left.

Make a lookup table for sqrt(w2-M[y][x]2) to avoid calculating it all the time.

Since @iAmOren was nice enough to provide working JS, I will blatantly copy that and fix it to use the faster algorithm:

var matrix=[
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
];


function createMatrixDivs() {
  for(var r=0; r<16; r++) {
    for(var c=0; c<16; c++) {
      var cell=document.createElement("div");
      cell.style="border:1px solid blue;position:absolute;width:10px;height:10px;left:"+10*c+"px;top:"+10*r+"px;";
      cell.id=r+","+c;
      document.body.append(cell);
    }
  }
}

function drawMatrixDivs() {
  for(var r=0; r<16; r++) {
    for(var c=0; c<16; c++) {
      document.getElementById(r+","+c).style.backgroundColor=(matrix[r][c]==0?"white":matrix[r][c]==1?"red":matrix[r][c]==2?"green":"gray");
    }
  }
}

function outline(w) {
  var M = matrix.map(function(row) {
    return row.slice();
  });
  var x,y,d,i,s,e;

  //PASS 1 - put vertical distances in M

  for(x=0; x<16; x++) {
    d=w+1;
    for(y=0; y<16; y++) {
      if (matrix[y][x]==1) {
        d=0;
      } else if (d<=w) {
        ++d;
      }
      M[y][x]=d;
    }
    d=w+1;
    for(y=15; y>=0; y--) {
      if (matrix[y][x]==1) {
        d=0;
      } else if (d<=w) {
        ++d;
      }
      if (M[y][x] > d) {
        M[y][x] = d;
      }
    }
  }

  // Precalculate vertical distance -> horizontal span
  var spans=[];
  for (i=0; i<=w; ++i) {
    spans[i] = Math.sqrt((w+0.3)*(w+0.3) - i*i)|0;
  }

  // PASS 2 fill every pixel within w

  for(y=0; y<16; y++) {
    e=-1;
    for (x=0; x<16; ++x) {
      d = M[y][x];
      if (d<=w) {
        s=Math.max(x,e);
        e=Math.max(e,x+spans[d]);
        for(; s<=e && s<16; ++s) {
          matrix[y][s] = matrix[y][s]||2;
        }
      }
    }
    e=17;
    for (x=15; x>=0; --x) {
      d = M[y][x];
      if (d<=w) {
        s=Math.min(x,e);
        e=Math.min(e,x-spans[d]);
        for(; s>=e && s>0; --s) {
          matrix[y][s] = matrix[y][s]||2;
        }
      }
    }
  }
  drawMatrixDivs();
}
createMatrixDivs();
drawMatrixDivs();
outline(+prompt("Enter outline width: "));

3
  • Thanks for the credit (and the up-vote)! I've run both, and yours is much faster (2ms vs 10ms+). (by using var t=new Date(); outline(3); console.log(new Date() - t);) The results seem a bit different, but, overall, goal achieved. I still don't understand how this is considered anything but O(n^4), and if it's not, how come mine isn't less than O(n^4) as well.
    – iAmOren
    Oct 16 '20 at 5:56
  • 1
    If you want to be more accurate about the complexity, this one is O(wid * hei), because it does a constant amount of work for each pixel, and yours is O(wid^2*hei^2), because for each clear pixel in the image, it searches the whole image for nearby red pixels. You could easily optimize that to O(wid * hei * w^2) by only searching w pixels away, but that is still a lot slower when w is big. Oct 16 '20 at 12:02
  • Since w & h are n, even a portion of them is O(wn), and searching even a limited by distance (there is no real way to search a circle, so) - a box needs to be searched, O(wn), and together: O(w^2 * h^2) => O(n^4), also, because distance could be n (w|h). Sure, I could have made my code more efficient, but, for starters, I wanted a code that works. It's a smaller step to add rubber to the stone wheel than to invent the wheel... :)
    – iAmOren
    Oct 16 '20 at 15:31

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