5

I have the following definitions:

trait A {
    fn f(&self);
}

trait B: A {
// ...
}

I'd like implement this kind of function:

fn convert(v: Rc<RefCell<dyn B>>) -> Rc<RefCell<dyn A>> {
}

I'd like to have a way for returning a value that share the same object, that's means that with these declarations:

let x: Rc<RefCell<dyn B>> /* = ... */;
let y = convert(Rc::clone(&x));

The calls x.f() and y.f() apply the call on the same object.

How can i implement the function convert or how can change the type definitions to have that behaviour and that kind of conversion (a conversion to a sub-object).

2
  • Clone an Rc<RefCell<MyType> trait object and cast it is approximately the same question, but the accepted answer does not really solve the problem.
    – trent
    Commented Oct 17, 2020 at 0:42
  • Yest @trentcl, this does solve the problem cause the TraitAB can't be an trait-object (cause the Self in method signature), but i appreciate the idea. Commented Oct 17, 2020 at 8:31

2 Answers 2

1

Rust does not support direct upcasting of trait objects. Due to the way trait objects are implemented, this is not possible without extra work at runtime, so Rust makes you do the work yourself.

You can do it like e.g.

use std::rc::Rc;
use std::cell::RefCell;

trait A {
  fn f(&self) -> i32;
}

trait B: A {
}

struct Wrapper(Rc<RefCell<dyn B>>);

impl A for Wrapper {
    fn f(&self) -> i32 {
        A::f(&*self.0.borrow())
    }
}

fn convert(v: Rc<RefCell<dyn B>>) -> Rc<RefCell<dyn A>> {
    Rc::new(RefCell::new(Wrapper(v)))
}
2
  • Yes, that good idea. But it misses a thing, the returned value of convert must refer to the object passed as the v parameter. But i know how to do, i'll use this idea of wrapper but by re-implementing the Rc type (a reference counter) in order to have the same reference returned by the function convert. Commented Oct 17, 2020 at 8:09
  • """ the returned value of convert must refer to the object passed as the v parameter""" If you mean we should reinterpret v as an Rc<RefCell<dyn A>>, that is not possible since they really, truly aren't the same thing. If you actually need a dyn A (and not just an A), you will have an intermediate value, for the same reason that fn convert(v: i32) -> String {...} has to have an intermediate value. They really, truly aren't the same thing. Commented Oct 17, 2020 at 20:05
0

Thank for your ideas, i decided to use a compromise by avoiding the use of a trait-object as parameter of the function convert in according to Rust rules:

use std::rc::Rc;
use std::cell::RefCell;

trait A {
    fn print(&self);
}

trait B: A {
}

trait Convert {
    fn convert(it: Rc<RefCell<Self>>) -> Rc<RefCell<dyn A>>;
}

struct MyType(u32);

impl Convert for MyType {
    fn convert(it: Rc<RefCell<Self>>) -> Rc<RefCell<dyn A>> {it}
}

impl A for MyType {
    fn print(&self) {
        println!("MyType({}) as A", self.0);
    }
}

impl B for MyType {}

fn main() {
    let a: Rc<RefCell<dyn A>>;
    {
        let b = Rc::new(RefCell::new(MyType(3)));
        a = Convert::convert(b.clone());
    }

    a.borrow().print();
}

Playground

4
  • This code does not do what you you asked for in the original post - try doing let b: Rc<RefCell<dyn B>> = Rc::new(RefCell::new(MyType(3))) (The first error you'll hit is that MyType does not impl B, but if you fix that you'll see that this approach does not do what you asked for in your question) Commented Oct 17, 2020 at 20:06
  • @MikeGraham Yes, i know that this code does not do what you you asked for in the original pos, i wrote that's a compromise. Rust can't do what i wanted (no way to pass RefCell<dyn B> to RefCell<dyn A>) cause the variance. Commented Oct 19, 2020 at 11:30
  • This code does not involve B in any way, other than to define B. MyType doesn't even impl B. Commented Oct 20, 2020 at 0:25
  • Thank you @MikeGraham, i modified MyType for implementing B. Commented Oct 21, 2020 at 7:44

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