2

hey guys so I have this code i'm working with and it's doing everything i need it to do, however, i can't figure out why my printf is printing out twice for level. here is the code.

while(fgets(str_read, sizeof(str_read)-1 , fptr)!= NULL)
    sscanf(str_read, "%d ", &somearray->level);
    printf("level: %d\n", somearray->level);

also if there is anything else i could work on im open to feed back. i'm working with a .txt file that has the following setup:

int
name
int
name
int
name
  • 1
    "here's the code"? I think not, unless it's somehow encoded in the period at the end of that sentence :-) – paxdiablo Oct 17 at 4:37
  • sorry i was having issues. still new so still getting my sea legs. – Ryanv048 Oct 17 at 4:39
  • also if anyone want to school me on how to do those cool code snipets with my own comments, i'm open for it also. – Ryanv048 Oct 17 at 4:41
  • Ryan, you can either put at least four spaces at the start of every code line (and a blank line before and after), or surround your code with triple backticks. For that first option, you can mark unindented text and then just use CTRL-K. – paxdiablo Oct 17 at 4:46
  • Presuming str_read is an array, sizeof(str_read)-1 simply needs to be sizeof(str_read), there is no -1 with fgets(), it will guarantee the resulting string is nul-terminated. Also printf("level: %d\n", somearray->level); is NOT part of your loop. C isn't Python.... – David C. Rankin Oct 17 at 4:48
1

You need to check the return value from sscanf. On lines that don't contain an integer, it will return 0. In that case, somearray->level will be unchanged, so you'll print it a second time.

One possible solution is:

while(fgets(str_read, sizeof(str_read)-1 , fptr)!= NULL)
    if (sscanf(str_read, "%d ", &somearray->level) == 1)
        printf("level: %d\n", somearray->level);

This attempts the sscanf for every line, but only prints the result if a value was found.

Another solution would be to keep track of even vs. odd lines, and only attempt the sscanf on odd lines.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks Tom for the help. Appreciate it – Ryanv048 Oct 17 at 4:59
  • @Ryanv048 - your takeaways here are (1) you validate EVERY user-input and (2) you validate EVERY conversion. You do that so you know you have a valid value before proceeding to use that value in your code. Failure to validate invites Undefined Behavior. – David C. Rankin Oct 17 at 5:33
0

First off, I'm going to assume your code has braces around it since otherwise, it would only print once at the end (braces control what's in a loop body, not indentation):

while(fgets(str_read, sizeof(str_read)-1 , fptr)!= NULL) {
    sscanf(str_read, "%d ", &somearray->level);
    printf("level: %d\n", somearray->level);
}

That gels with what you're seeing. If your text file consists of alternating integers and non-integer names, every second sscanf will fail because a name cannot be treated as an integer. Since you don't check the return value, you just blindly assume the conversion worked and print the value that was previously in somearray->level.

Calls to the scanf family of function should generally include a check to ensure everything was correctly scanned, something like:

if (sscanf(str_read, "%d ", &somearray->level) != 1) {
    handleBadScan();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks Pax Thats really good to know. I'll work on that checker. – Ryanv048 Oct 17 at 4:59
  • Hey Pax question for you. where should I turn too to learn more about the return values of thing like in this example 1. I know 0 in return means it executed just fine and no errors and returns like 1 and -1 returns errors. Are they the same concept as in the if statement? Hope that makes sense. lol – Ryanv048 Oct 17 at 5:31
  • Ryan, I use the C standard for this but it's mostly a pretty dry read, so you may want to think about just looking at the manpages, or cplusplus.com. However, as the definitive source for what the functions do, I prefer the standard. – paxdiablo Oct 17 at 5:48

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.