11

I want to match against a programmatically-constructed regex, containing a number of (.*) capture groups. I have this regex as a string, say

my $rx = "(.*)a(.*)b(.*)"

I would like to interpolate that string as a regex and match for it. The docs tell me <$rx> should do the trick (i.e. interpolate that string as a regex), but it doesn't. Compare the output of a match (in the perl6 REPL):

> 'xaybz' ~~ rx/<$rx>/
「xaybz」

vs the expected/desired output, setting apart the capture groups:

> 'xaybz' ~~ rx/(.*)a(.*)b(.*)/
「xaybz」
 0 => 「x」
 1 => 「y」
 2 => 「z」

Comments

One unappealing way I can do this is to EVAL my regex match (also in the REPL):

> use MONKEY; EVAL "'xaybz' ~~ rx/$rx/";
「xaybz」
 0 => 「x」
 1 => 「y」
 2 => 「z」

So while this does give me a solution, I'm sure there's a string-interpolation trick I'm missing that would obviate the need to rely on EVAL..

10

The result of doing the match is being matched when going outside the regex. This will work:

my $rx = '(.*)a(.*)b(.*)';
'xaybz' ~~ rx/$<result>=<$rx>/;
say $<result>;
# OUTPUT: «「xaybz」␤ 0 => 「x」␤ 1 => 「y」␤ 2 => 「z」␤»

Since, by assigning to a Match variable, you're accessing the raw Match, which you can then print. The problem is that <$rx> is, actually, a Match, not a String. So what you're doing is a Regex that matches a Match. Possibly the Match is stringified, and then matched. Which is the closest I can be to explaining the result

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  • 1
    Thank you very much, but I don't think I really understand what happened there. Could you please point me to where this is documented? – grobber Oct 19 at 7:33
  • What confuses me is that "stringification" does not seem to be what's happening. Note the quotation marks 「 」 around the result I get. If I stringify the match with $/.Str those are gone. So my getting 「xaybz」 cannot be due to "stringification", as that's still a Match object. The problem seems to be that the capturing parentheses are ignored in my initial attempt, and I don't see why that is. – grobber Oct 19 at 8:40
  • @grobber that's right. It's simply being converted into a different Match object. I'll edit a bit to try and explain what's going on. Essentially, <$rx> is a Match, and you're matching to a Match, which is stringified... – jjmerelo Oct 19 at 11:31
9

The problem is that things in <…> don't capture in general.

'xaybz' ~~ / <:Ll> <:Ll> <:Ll> /
# 「xay」

They do capture if the first thing after < is an alphabetic.

my regex foo { (.*)a(.*)b(.*) }

'xaybz' ~~ / <foo> /;
# 「xaybza」
#  foo => 「xaybza」
#   0 => 「x」
#   1 => 「y」
#   2 => 「za」

That also applies if you use <a=…>

'xaybz' ~~ / <rx=$rx> /;
# 「xaybza」
#  rx => 「xaybza」
#   0 => 「x」
#   1 => 「y」
#   2 => 「za」

Of course you can assign it on the outside as well.

'xaybz' ~~ / $<rx> = <$rx> /;
# 「xaybza」
#  rx => 「xaybza」
#   0 => 「x」
#   1 => 「y」
#   2 => 「za」

'xaybz' ~~ / $0 = <$rx> /;
# 「xaybza」
#  0 => 「xaybza」
#   0 => 「x」
#   1 => 「y」
#   2 => 「za」

Note that <…> is a sub-match, so the $0,$1,$2 from the $rx will never be on the top-level.

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  • Thanks for that explanation. The bit about non-alphabetic <> in particular was illuminating. Note that the issue propagates: if I first do my $rx='(\d)'; my regex R { <$rx> }; '12' ~~ /<R>/ it still doesn't capture. – grobber Oct 19 at 15:14
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    grobber: that's because you defined R as <$rx>. If you do regex R { <rx=$rx> } then it will work. One of the reasons for requiring the naming is that positional captures are counted at a compile time. If you do regex R { <$rx> (.) } it will be impossible to know what the number for (.) should be. Named captures don't suffer from the same limitation. – user0721090601 Oct 19 at 15:51
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    "Note that the issue propagates". I'm struck by your choice of the word issue. The fact that only <...> assertions that start with an alphabetic character capture is a deliberate feature. In your example... ah, @user0721090601 has covered that. :) – raiph Oct 19 at 15:52
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    @raiph: only an "issue" from my previously-uninformed perspective. Thank you both (yourself and @user0721090601): the motivation for requiring named <> is clear now. – grobber Oct 19 at 18:04
1

You could do the following to expose the inner regex result to an outside variable:

my $rx = "(.*)a(.*)b(.*)";
my $result;

'xaybz' ~~ / $<result>=<$rx> {$result = $<result>}/;

say $result;

# OUTPUT:

# 「xaybz」
# 0 => 「x」
# 1 => 「y」
# 2 => 「z」
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