2

I was wondering if there was any way to do something like this in C++:

$(some typename) func() {
    if (/*condition*/) return int;
    else return bool;
}

Edit: I think I wasn't clear enough. I was wondering if you could say something like this: func() var = /*something*/. Basically, the function is returning something like int or bool (the type, not a value of that type).

15
  • 2
    @dantheking-crypto That sounds like a job for a virtual function, that's what they're for. – Anonymous1847 Oct 19 '20 at 18:03
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    @dantheking-crypto Stop adding essential information in your comments please. Edit your question instead, or even better write a clear question and explain your specific problem from the start. – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 19 '20 at 18:05
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    You have an XY problem. Please describe the actual problem you want to solve instead of solution you think could be applied. – Yksisarvinen Oct 19 '20 at 18:06
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    @Fuad We can agree to disagree. – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 19 '20 at 18:09
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    @dantheking-crypto It's good that you edit the question, but your still not giving enough information. What you ask can probably be done... but that depends on how you are planning to use func() in your example. If it was as simple always returning the same type you could just use a type alias. But It seems to me you have some other idea on how to use this func idea, and before you explain what that is giving you the right answer is close to impossible. – super Oct 19 '20 at 18:11
4

A function cannot choose which type to return at runtime; it must have a definite return type at compile time. What you can use instead is a template with a member type. You will need to use template metaprogramming for this. As an example, here is an adapter template that makes a type T into its const pointer form:

template <typename T>
struct make_const_ptr {
    using type = const T*;
};

template <typename>
using make_const_ptr_t<T> = typename make_const_ptr<T>::type

This is essentially a "function" that returns a type, in the sense that you can "call" it by writing make_const_ptr_t<T>. You can do a bunch more operations on types using template metaprogramming: https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/template-metaprogramming-in-c/ .

Plus, you said in your comments that you wanted to use this to choose which template function to use on a polymorphic type. An even better way to do this is to use a virtual function; doing different things for different polymorphic types is the whole point of virtual functions:

template <typename T>
void template_function(const T& obj) {
    // ...
}

class Base {
    // ...
    virtual void do_template_function() = 0;
};

class D : public Base {
    virtual void do_template_function() {
        template_function<D>(*this);
    }
};

class E : public Base {
    virtual void do_template_function() {
        template_function<E>(*this);
    }
};

void f(Base* obj) {
    // ...
    obj->do_template_function();
    // ...
}
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    i dont understand how this answers the question, but I also don't understand the question... – largest_prime_is_463035818 Oct 19 '20 at 18:08
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    @idclev463035818 I'm explaining how you can write a "function" that returns a type, as the OP is asking. Of course this is not an actual function but acts like a function in the way the OP wants. – Anonymous1847 Oct 19 '20 at 18:09
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    OPs code has a condition that is evaluated at runtime in the example. I wouldn't know how this fits in here – largest_prime_is_463035818 Oct 19 '20 at 18:11
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    No point in guessing what OP wants, let him clarify his question instead. – super Oct 19 '20 at 18:14
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    i know that there is a way to interpret the question that makes your answer kind of ok. I am trying to tell you that this isnt the only interpretation ;) – largest_prime_is_463035818 Oct 19 '20 at 18:14
0

You cannot do what you intended, but you can return different type using templates. For example like this:

#include <iostream>

template <class T>
T ret()
{
    T i = 5;
    if (i == 0)
    {
        int a = 1;
        return a;
    }
    else
    {
        bool t = false;
        return t;
    }   

}

int main ()
{
    int t = ret<int>();
    return 0;
}
0

There is a cute library Boost.Hana that can be used for computations on types in C++ metaprogramming.

With Boost.Hana a function returning an object representing the C++ type could look like this:

auto func()
{
   return hana::if_(
      /*constexpr condition*/,
      hana::type_c<int>,
      hana::type_c<bool>
   );
}

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