79

The Situation

I am using TypeScript, and have a try / catch block. The caught error is typed (Error). I would like to use the error's message attribute.

I am using eslint with the @typescript-eslint/no-unsafe-assignment rule enabled.

The Code

try {
  throw new Error('foo');
} catch (err: Error) {
  const { message }: { message: string } = err;
  return {
    message: `Things exploded (${message})`,
  };
}

The Problem

When I run my linter, I receive the following:

  4:9  error  Unsafe assignment of an any value  @typescript-eslint/no-unsafe-assignment

This is confusing to me, since the error is typed (Error).

The Question

How can I catch an error in TypeScript and access the Error's properties?

6 Answers 6

128

TypeScript 4.0 introduced the ability to declare the type of a catch clause variable... so long as you type it as unknown:

TypeScript 4.0 now lets you specify the type of catch clause variables as unknown instead. unknown is safer than any because it reminds us that we need to perform some sorts of type-checks before operating on our values.

We don't have the ability to give caught errors arbitrary types; we still need to use type guards to examine the caught value at runtime:

try {
  throw new Error('foo');
} catch (err: unknown) {
  if (err instanceof Error) {
    return {
      message: `Things exploded (${err.message})`,
    };
  }
}
4
  • 18
    In addition to this, it is completely valid (while also completely unreasonable) to throw values of arbitrary types in Javascript, a-la throw 42, hence why it's not valid to not mark err as Error.
    – Etheryte
    Oct 20, 2020 at 20:19
  • @etheryte while it is possible to throw any type of value, why does typescript does not allow the author to explicitly mark the error as a specific type (assuming that the author knows the code better and would know the type of error being thrown)
    – gaurav5430
    Oct 31, 2021 at 10:19
  • 1
    If author knew explicitly error thrown by his code, he wouldn't use types and typescript at all :)
    – Fedcomp
    Jan 29, 2022 at 2:19
  • 4
    alternatively ` catch (ex) { if (!(ex instanceof Error)) { throw ex; } ...}` which provides the same type guard but has the advantage of not silently swallowing any malformed errors!
    – Jamie Pate
    Feb 4, 2022 at 21:22
26

Since Typescript 3.7 you can make an assertion type guard

export function assertIsError(error: unknown): asserts error is Error {
    // if you have nodejs assert: 
    // assert(error instanceof Error);
    // otherwise
    if (!(error instanceof Error)) {
        throw error
    }
}
} catch (err) {
  assertIsError(err);
  // err is now typed as Error
  return { message: `Things exploded (${err.message})` };
}
1
  • 3
    This is a correct answer. Unexpected types of cought exceptions should be rethrowed (exception bubbling) Feb 15, 2022 at 15:38
10

I'd suggest using the ternary operator with a type check. The accepted answer allows execution to continue in the case the error is not an Error (e.g. someone has decided to throw 42 or something equally valid yet unreasonable)

try {
    throw new Error('foo');
} catch (e) {
    const message = e instanceof Error ? e.message : "Unknown error."
    return {
        message
    }
}
5

The catch parameter type can only be any or unknown. I think in your case it's considered as any.

Is this working in your environment?

try {
  throw new Error('foo');
} catch (err: unknown) {
  const { message } = err as Error; // I removed : { message: string } because it should be infered
  return {
    message: `Things exploded (${message})`,
  };
}
2
  • 6
    This works, but I've found that type assertions are risky because they break in hard-to-debug ways. What happens if err is not an Error? Better to do the runtime check.
    – Jason Owen
    Oct 20, 2020 at 20:59
  • 4
    @JasonOwen I agree, I simply haven't thought about it. That's a very good comment as this kind of code is usually placed on entry points of an app.
    – devdgehog
    Oct 20, 2020 at 21:15
5

Visit https://devblogs.microsoft.com/typescript/announcing-typescript-4-4/

" Using unknown in Catch Variables Users running with the --strict flag may see new errors around catch variables being unknown, especially if the existing code assumes only Error values have been caught. This often results in error messages such as:

Property 'message' does not exist on type 'unknown'. Property 'name' does not exist on type 'unknown'. Property 'stack' does not exist on type 'unknown'.

To get around this, you can specifically add runtime checks to ensure that the thrown type matches your expected type. Otherwise, you can just use a type assertion,

add an explicit : any to your catch variable, or turn off --useUnknownInCatchVariables."

you can simply add in tsconfig.json:

"compilerOptions": { "useUnknownInCatchVariables": false }

or you can use like:

catch (e: any) {console.log(e.message)}

4

TL;DR: I made a tiny library to make catching unknown safely easy:

import { asError } from 'catch-unknown';

try {
  throw new Error('foo');
} catch (err) {
  return {
    message: `Things exploded (${asError(err).message})`,
  };
}

According to Typescript's lib.es5.d.ts file, an Error is any object with string properties called name and message and optionally stack.

interface Error {
    name: string;
    message: string;
    stack?: string;
}

In practice, errors are generally created using the Error constructor (which is required for instanceof Error to be true):

interface ErrorConstructor {
    new(message?: string): Error;
    (message?: string): Error;
    readonly prototype: Error;
}

declare var Error: ErrorConstructor;

The catch-unknown library provides two simple functions:

export declare function isError(err: unknown): err is Error;
export declare function asError(err: unknown): Error;

isError is a typical type guard, which checks for the correct property types, as opposed to using instanceof (for maximum compatibility). asError is essentially isError(err) ? err : { name: typeof err, message: String(err) }, plus handling of a few special cases. 99.99% of the time, values you catch are already conform to Error, so all that happens is a quick type check.

2
  • 1
    That looks like a great library, but the repository is gone from GitHub Jan 2, 2023 at 16:49
  • 1
    @RobinDaugherty I just fixed the visibility of the repository on GitHub. You should be able to access it now. Jan 2, 2023 at 22:27

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