3

I need to clean up resources allocated by a JNI call. It's easy to do it by overriding Object.finalize() method. Since this method is deprecated starting with Java 9, I'm trying to achieve the same thing using the new java.lang.ref.Cleaner class.

Here is the code for calling ToBeCleaned.cleanUp method before the instance is garbage collected:

import java.lang.ref.Cleaner;
import java.lang.ref.WeakReference;

public class ToBeCleaned {

    private static Cleaner cleaner = Cleaner.create();

    public ToBeCleaned() {
        cleaner.register(this, new CleanRunnable(this));
    }

    void cleanUp () {
        // do cleanup
    }


    static class CleanRunnable implements Runnable {
        // It has to be weak reference, otherwise ToBeCleaned instance
        // would never be eligible for GC
        private WeakReference<ToBeCleaned> toBeCleanedWeakReference;

        CleanRunnable(ToBeCleaned  toBeCleaned) {
            this.toBeCleanedWeakReference = new WeakReference<>(toBeCleaned);
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            toBeCleanedWeakReference.get().cleanUp();
        }
    }
}

My question: Is this the right approach?

0

1 Answer 1

5

Your approach has a flaw. The "cleaning action" must not depend on having access to the instance registered with the Cleaner.

In short, the call to toBeCleanedWeakReference.get() in your code will return null since the ToBeCleaned instance will have been, at least from our perspective, garbage collected by that point.

The correct approach is to somehow reference the resource that needs to be cleaned up without "going through" the ToBeCleaned instance. Typically this means either:

  1. Making the cleaning action and the resource the same object (distinct from the object registered with the Cleaner). The documentation of Cleaner shows an example of this approach.

  2. Passing a reference to the resource, but not the object registered with the Cleaner, to the cleaning action when instantiating it. Here's an example:

    public class ToBeCleaned implements AutoCloseable {
    
      // documentation suggests you should preferably have one
      // Cleaner instance per library
      private static final Cleaner CLEANER = ...;
    
      private final Cleaner.Cleanable cleanable;
      private final SomeResource resource;
    
      public ToBeCleaned() {
        resource = ...;
        cleanable = CLEANER.register(this, new CleaningAction(resource));
      }
    
      @Override
      public void close() {
        cleanable.clean();
      }
    
      private static class CleaningAction implements Runnable {
    
        private final SomeResource resource;
    
        CleaningAction(SomeResource resource) {
          this.resource = resource;
        }
    
        @Override
        public void run() {
          // clean up 'resource'
        }
      }
    }
    

Both examples implement AutoCloseable. That gives users of your API the ability to release the resources on-demand rather than waiting for the garbage collector to kick in (which makes the Cleaner more of a "back up").

3
  • I removed the "strength" portion from that paragraph. Would it be more correct to interpret the documentation as describing how "aggressively" the GC will decide when to collect an object? E.g. Strong = never, soft = only when needed, weak = when the GC runs, phantom = ???
    – Slaw
    Oct 21, 2020 at 9:48
  • 2
    For a soft reference, yes, the presence of at least one soft reference indicates that the garbage collector should be less aggressive about reclaiming it. For a phantom reference, clearing and enqueuing should only happen when it is guaranteed that no finalizer may resurrect the object. At this point, all other references should be cleared as well, but further, since the question is about “Cleaner as alternative to Object.finalize”, this difference should not matter. When an object is not reachable by any object with a “nontrivial finalize method”, weak and phantom references behave the same.
    – Holger
    Oct 21, 2020 at 9:53
  • 2
    I understand now why my approach is totally wrong: "The cleaning action is invoked only after the associated object becomes phantom reachable, so it is important that the object implementing the cleaning action does not hold references to the object." (java.lang.ref.Cleaner Javadoc). I have missed this when reading the Javadoc.
    – user10871691
    Oct 21, 2020 at 10:47

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