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I wanted to have an abstraction between two classes and need to pass data between them, at the interface level we are not aware of the type of data, but the concreate implementation of the interfaces are aware of the data type, and they are different for each concreate implementation. below is the example:

class IA
{
    void func(uint8_t datatype,void* arg) = 0;
};

    
class IB
{
  void doSomethingOne() = 0;
  void doSomethingTwo() = 0;

  private:
    IA* pA;
};

typedef enum color{RED,BLUE,GREEN} ColorType;
typedef enum shape{CIRCLE,SQUARE,RECTANGLE} ShapeType;

class DerivedB :public IB
{
   Derived(DerivedA* p):pA(p)
  {}
   void doSomethingOne()
   {
     //do
     //do
     ColorType color = RED;
     RedData* pRedData = {}; //some structure that has data
     pA->func(static_cast<uint8_t>(color),pRedData);
   }

   void doSomethingTwo()
   {
     //do
     //do
     ColorType color = BLUE;
     BlueData* pBlueData = {}; //some structure that has data
     pA->func(static_cast<uint8_t>(color),pBlueData);
   }
};

class DerivedTwoB :public IB
{
  DerivedTwoB(DerivedATwo * p):pA(p)
  {}

   void doSomethingOne()
   {
     //do
     //do
     ShapeType shape = CIRCLE;
     CircleData* pData = {}; //some structure that has data
     pA->func(static_cast<uint8_t>(shape),pData );
   }

  void doSomethingTwo()
   {
     //do
     //do
     ShapeType shape = SQUARE;
     SquareData* pData = {}; //some structure that has data
     pA->func(static_cast<uint8_t>(shape),pData );
   }

};


class DerivedA : public IA
{

    void func(colorType color,void* arg) 
    {
             
         if(color == RED)
         {
             RedData pData* = nullptr;
             pData = reinterpret_cast<RedData*>(arg);
             //use pData
             .
             . 
             //do something with pData
         }
         if(color == BLUE)
         {
             BlueData pData* = nullptr;
             pData = reinterpret_cast<BlueData*>(arg);
             //use pData
             .
             . 
             //do something with pData
         }
    }

};

class DerivedATwo : public IA
{

    void func(ShapeType shape,void* arg) 
    {
             
         if(shape == CIRCLE)
         {
             CircleData pData* = nullptr;
             pData = reinterpret_cast<CircleData*>(arg);
             //use pData
             .
             . 
             //do something with pData
         }
         if(shape == SQUARE)
         {
             SquareData pData* = nullptr;
             pData = reinterpret_cast<SquareData*>(arg);
             //use pData
             .
             . 
             //do something with pData
         }
    }

};

I want to avoid passing void* data across objects, but this would lead to implementation of several func() for each data type. and breaks the implementation for interfaces (Substitution Principle). Can I achieve the same behavior using other methods but avoid using void* and achieve type safety?

3
  • void* is the ultimate type erasure. But it's also not very type safe. Templates can help you out here depending on what you're actually trying to achieve. Failing that, even an interface might be better in some cases. Ultimately it comes down to what you're doing and what your constraints are. – AndyG Oct 21 '20 at 18:57
  • It totally depends on the concrete situation. No one can actually tell, if it's good to do so or not. – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 21 '20 at 19:05
  • Note that in while passing void * can be the right answer, usually it's not. – user4581301 Oct 21 '20 at 19:20
1

I want to avoid passing void* data across objects, but this would lead to implementation of several func() for each data type. and breaks the implementation for interfaces (Substitution Principle).

If you need different data types and they are processed differently (with maybe some common processing), then most likely overloading is the best solution.

If you really want to use an unbounded set of types in your interfaces but the implementation know which type to take, maybe std::any would be a better choice since it's a bit like void* but it keeps value semantics and is much safer to use.

I would still consider other solutions before std::any though.

If on the other hand you have an unbounded number of data types to process, but it's all almost the same implementation, then maybe you can look into templates.

If you really need runtime polymorphism, then a std::variant is be best choice for a bounded amount of types, and inheritance/type erasure if the number of types is unbounded.


Even if I don't recommend using it, especially in interfaces, the void* type still has its uses, mainly when implementing type erasure or when you roll your own polymorphism. However, you'll find it mostly in implementation detail and not in interfaces.

You'll sometime see it in C interfaces when using callbacks, but in C++ you can hide it away in implementation detail.

4
  • Sometimes you have no other choice than void* either. I am thinking of callback definitions, where the user of the callback demands what void* actually means. – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 21 '20 at 19:37
  • True. I've missed explaining where it's a better idea to use void* – Guillaume Racicot Oct 21 '20 at 19:39
  • Except when you are interfacing with a C API, std::any is almost always a better alternative to void* because it is type safe. With void* you eventually have to cast it back to something and if you get it wrong, too bad. With std::any you have to do the same thing but at least it will complain when you get it wrong. – François Andrieux Oct 21 '20 at 19:47
  • @FrançoisAndrieux I could add std::any there too. However when implementing low level stuff like custom polymorphism, sometimes void* do exactly what is needed. – Guillaume Racicot Oct 21 '20 at 19:48

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