Is it possible to use the CSS3 selector :first-of-type to select the first element with a given class name? I haven't been successful with my test so I'm thinking it's not?

The Code (http://jsfiddle.net/YWY4L/):

p:first-of-type {color:blue}
p.myclass1:first-of-type {color:red}
.myclass2:first-of-type {color:green}
<div>
  <div>This text should appear as normal</div>
  <p>This text should be blue.</p>
  <p class="myclass1">This text should appear red.</p>
  <p class="myclass2">This text should appear green.</p>
</div>

up vote 289 down vote accepted

No, it's not possible using just one selector. The :first-of-type pseudo-class selects the first element of its type (div, p, etc). Using a class selector (or a type selector) with that pseudo-class means to select an element if it has the given class (or is of the given type) and is the first of its type among its siblings.

Unfortunately, CSS doesn't provide a :first-of-class selector that only chooses the first occurrence of a class. As a workaround, you can use something like this:

.myclass1 { color: red; }
.myclass1 ~ .myclass1 { color: /* default, or inherited from parent div */; }

Explanations and illustrations for the workaround are given here and here.

  • This works if you only have 2 elements but fails with more ): – just Nik Mar 16 '16 at 13:04
  • 4
    No @justNik this does work for multiple elements. The .myclass1 selector would select every element of .myclass1. The selector .myclass1 ~ .myclass1 uses the general sibling combinator to select every element with the class .myclass1 that is a following sibling of an element with a class of .myclass1. This is explained in amazing detail here. – WebWanderer Apr 21 '16 at 18:56

The draft CSS Selectors Level 4 proposes to add an of <other-selector> grammar within the :nth-child selector. This would allow you to pick out the nth child matching a given other selector:

:nth-child(1 of p.myclass) 

Previous drafts used a new pseudo-class, :nth-match(), so you may see that syntax in some discussions of the feature:

:nth-match(1 of p.myclass)

This has now been implemented in WebKit, and is thus available in Safari, but that appears to be the only browser that supports it. There are tickets filed for implementing it Blink (Chrome), Gecko (Firefox), and a request to implement it in Edge, but no apparent progress on any of these.

  • 87
    Only 10 years, and I can use this. Though the project that I would use this needs to be done tomorrow. – Lajos Meszaros Feb 19 '14 at 17:52
  • 1
    :nth-match() was dropped in favor of new features for nth-child(), which are not well supported yet: caniuse.com/#feat=css-nth-child-of – nabrown78 May 21 '17 at 19:42
  • @nabrown78 Thanks for the heads up, updated the answer to be current. – Brian Campbell May 22 '17 at 15:46

I found a solution for your reference. from some group divs select from group of two same class divs the first one

p[class*="myclass"]:not(:last-of-type) {color:red}
p[class*="myclass"]:last-of-type {color:green}

BTW, I don't know why :last-of-type works, but :first-of-type does not work.

My experiments on jsfiddle... https://jsfiddle.net/aspanoz/m1sg4496/

  • This does not work as required, as can already be seen from the fiddle. The only thing this does, is not select the last div if it does not have the class. – Marten Koetsier Aug 23 at 6:36

This is an old thread, but I'm responding because it still appears high in the list of search results. Now that the future has arrived, you can use the :nth-child pseudo-selector.

p:nth-child(1) { color: blue; }
p.myclass1:nth-child(1) { color: red; }
p.myclass2:nth-child(1) { color: green; }

The :nth-child pseudo-selector is powerful - the parentheses accept formulas as well as numbers.

More here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/:nth-child

This it not possible to use the CSS3 selector :first-of-type to select the first element with a given class name.

However, if the targeted element has a previous element sibling, you can combine the negation CSS pseudo-class and the adjacent sibling selectors to match an element that doesn't immediately have a previous element with the same class name :

:not(.myclass1) + .myclass1

Full working code example:

p:first-of-type {color:blue}
p:not(.myclass1) + .myclass1 { color: red }
p:not(.myclass2) + .myclass2 { color: green }
<div>
  <div>This text should appear as normal</div>
  <p>This text should be blue.</p>
  <p class="myclass1">This text should appear red.</p>
  <p class="myclass2">This text should appear green.</p>
</div>

As a fallback solution, you could wrap your classes in a parent element like this:

<div>
    <div>This text should appear as normal</div>
    <p>This text should be blue.</p>
    <div>
        <!-- first-child / first-of-type starts from here -->
        <p class="myclass1">This text should appear red.</p>
        <p class="myclass2">This text should appear green.</p>
    </div>
</div>

Not sure how to explain this but I ran into something similar today. Not being able to set .user:first-of-type{} while .user:last-of-type{} worked fine. This was fixed after I wrapped them inside a div without any class or styling:

https://codepen.io/adrianTNT/pen/WgEpbE

<style>
.user{
  display:block;
  background-color:#FFCC00;
}

.user:first-of-type{
  background-color:#FF0000;
}
</style>

<p>Not working while this P additional tag exists</p>

<p class="user">A</p>
<p class="user">B</p>
<p class="user">C</p>

<p>Working while inside a div:</p>

<div>
<p class="user">A</p>
<p class="user">B</p>
<p class="user">C</p>
</div>

Simply :first works for me, why isn't this mentioned yet?

  • 2
    :first is a pseudo-class related to printing. – Stijn Nov 23 '16 at 15:06

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