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I have a fairly simple question with an already convoluted answer (via loop), but I'm hoping someone can point me to a more elegant answer in purrr.

Basically, I'm thinking of an introduction to permutations for my students as a computational alternative to your boilerplate means to statistical inference (i.e. t and z values). In the toy example I have set up, I'm doing some grouped means (via dplyr''s group_by() and summarize()) along with permutations via modelr. I'd like to know how I can store the grouped means in the nested tibble containing the permutations.

I already have a solution via loop (that bypasses storing them in the tibble with the permutations), but I'd like to see what the solution in purrr would be.

Here's a basic example of what I'm doing.

library(tidyverse)
library(modelr)

mtcars %>%
  permute(1000, mpg) -> perm_mtcars

perm_sums <- tibble()

# convoluted loop answer, does what I want,
# but is convoluted loop and spams the R console with messages
# about "ungrouping output" because of group_by()
for (i in 1:1000) {
  perm_mtcars %>%
    slice(i) %>%
    pull(perm) %>% as.data.frame %>%
    group_by(cyl) %>%
    summarize(mean = mean(mpg)) %>%
    mutate(perm = i) -> hold_this
  perm_sums <- bind_rows(perm_sums, hold_this)
}

# what I'd like to do, based off how easy this is to pull off with running regressions,
# tidying the output, and extracting that.
perm_mtcars %>%
  mutate(groupsums = map(perm, ~summarize(???)) %>%
  # and where I might be getting ahead of myself
  pull(groupsums) %>% 
  map2_df(., seq(1, 1000), ~mutate(.x, perm = .y))

This is probably easy in purrr but purrr is mostly Greek to me right now, to borrow that expression.

2

It sounds to me like you might benefit from operating on "list-columns" and then using the tidyr::unnest function.

In this example, I use lapply to operate on the list column, but you could easily use purrr::map if you really wanted to.

library(tidyverse)
library(modelr)

groupmean <- function(x) {
  x %>% 
    as.data.frame %>%
    group_by(cyl) %>%
    summarize(mpg_mean = mean(mpg), .groups = 'drop')
}

perm_means <- mtcars %>%
  permute(1000, mpg) %>%
  mutate(perm = lapply(perm, groupmean)) %>%
  unnest(perm)

perm_means %>% head
#> # A tibble: 6 x 3
#>     cyl mpg_mean .id  
#>   <dbl>    <dbl> <chr>
#> 1     4     17.5 0001 
#> 2     6     23.6 0001 
#> 3     8     20.3 0001 
#> 4     4     20.1 0002 
#> 5     6     19.6 0002 
#> 6     8     20.3 0002

And for posterity, here's the equivalent using data.table:

library(data.table)
library(modelr)

f = function(x) as.data.table(x)[, .(mpg_mean = mean(mpg)), by=.(cyl)]
perm_mtcars = permute(mtcars, 1000, mpg)
perm_mtcars = data.table(perm_mtcars)
perm_mtcars[, perm := lapply(perm, f)][
            , perm[[1]], by=.(.id)]
#>        .id cyl mpg_mean
#>    1: 0001   6 17.21429
#>    2: 0001   4 22.52727
#>    3: 0001   8 19.61429
#>    4: 0002   6 19.92857
#>    5: 0002   4 22.40909
#>   ---                  
#> 2996: 0999   4 20.85455
#> 2997: 0999   8 19.22143
#> 2998: 1000   6 18.41429
#> 2999: 1000   4 18.20000
#> 3000: 1000   8 22.41429
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  • 1
    Yep, that was it. Thank you kindly. – steve Oct 21 '20 at 20:54

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