1

I am trying to have a C++ program call an already made C# program to run in the background.

STARTUPINFO info = {sizeof(info)};
PROCESS_INFORMATION processinfo;
DWORD error1 = GetLastError();
bool x = ::CreateProcess((LPCWSTR)"C:\Convert_Shrink.exe", GetCommandLine(), NULL, NULL, false, 0,NULL,NULL, &info, &processinfo);
DWORD error = GetLastError();

error1 is 0 before CreateProcess error is 2 after CreateProcess

error 2:

ERROR_FILE_NOT_FOUND 2 (0x2) The system cannot find the file specified.

I've changed it to C:\ \ incase they were checking for escape sequences but I still get error 2 and I'm not sure why.

  • 3
    That cast only stops the compiler from telling you that you did it wrong. It didn't stop you from doing it wrong. Put an L in front of the string to make it a Unicode literal. – Hans Passant Jun 22 '11 at 23:19
  • is it possible that the application path can only be so long aswell? I put the program in C:\ for testing, but it needs to be in the same directory as the program which is deeper in the directory. – Grant Jun 22 '11 at 23:33
4

You can:

  • Use CreateProcessA to match your ANSI file path:

    bool x = ::CreateProcessA("C:\\Convert_Shrink.exe", GetCommandLineA(), NULL, NULL, false, 0,NULL,NULL, &info, &processinfo);
    

* Provide a file path which matches the string format required by your Unicode settings:

    bool x = ::CreateProcess(_T("C:\\Convert_Shrink.exe"), GetCommandLine(), NULL, NULL, false, 0,NULL,NULL, &info, &processinfo);

or

  • Use CreateProcessW so you can pass a Unicode filepath (supports extended characters):

    bool x = ::CreateProcessW(L"C\\\Convert_Shrink.exe", GetCommandLineW(), NULL, NULL, false, 0,NULL,NULL, &info, &processinfo);
    

(as @dolphy noted, the argument has to be a writable string)

  • Provide a file path which matches the string format required by your Unicode settings:

    #if UNICODE
    std::wstring exename =
    #else
    const char* exename =
    #endif
        _T("C:\\Convert_Shrink.exe");
    bool x = ::CreateProcess(&exename[0], GetCommandLine(), NULL, NULL, false, 0,NULL,NULL, &info, &processinfo);
    

or

  • Use CreateProcessW so you can pass a Unicode filepath (supports extended characters):

    wchar_t exename[] = L"C:\\Convert_Shrink.exe";
    bool x = ::CreateProcessW(exename, GetCommandLineW(), NULL, NULL, false, 0,NULL,NULL, &info, &processinfo);
    
  • You made a bit of a meal of this one. Just replace (LPCWSTR) with L and it's all good! ;-) – David Heffernan Jun 23 '11 at 11:29
  • @David: Nope, CreateProcessW requires its argument to be writable. MSDN expressly forbids passing a string literal. – Ben Voigt Jun 23 '11 at 13:32
  • Very good. I guess that's because the implementation uses the input buffer for its parsing. – David Heffernan Jun 23 '11 at 13:46
2

Just for the record. CreateProcessAsUser calls SearchPath internally. SearchPath uses the File System Redirector https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa384187%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

So, if you are running a 32 bit app under WOW64 and you ask for a process using an exe in system32 dir e.g. "c:\windows\system32\myapp.exe", CreateProcessAsUser will look in syswow64 instead e.g."c:\windows\syswow64\myapp.exe". If your exe is not there you'll get a "file not found error".

  • Thanks for this filesystem redirection note. I wasted half a day figuring this out on Win 7 x64 bit system! :) – code82 Oct 18 '16 at 17:31
0

I just looked up GetCommandLine(), and MSDN states that it gets the command line for the current process. MSDN entry for CreateProcess() states that the second argument is the command line command that you want to be executed, if I'm reading it correctly. So you are essentially telling CreateProcess() to run another instance of the C++ program, not the C# program.

(edit) Actually, upon closer inspection, the CreateProcess() documentation does not seem to clearly explain what will happen if you supply both the first and second arguments. It says that the first specifies the module and the second specifies the command line. What's the diff?

Sorry for the inconclusive answer, I would convert this answer into a couple of comments on your question if I could.

  • Maybe he wants to forward all the arguments. It's hard to tell. But the cast is most definitely wrong. – Ben Voigt Jun 22 '11 at 23:12
-2

Have you tried casting the string to LPCTSTR instead:

bool x = ::CreateProcess((LPCTSTR)"C:\Convert_Shrink.exe", GetCommandLine(), NULL, NULL, false, 0,NULL,NULL, &info, &processinfo); 

From Microsoft:

The Unicode version of this function, CreateProcessW, can modify the contents 
of this string. Therefore, this parameter cannot be a pointer to read-only 
memory (such as a const variable or a literal string). If this parameter is a 
constant string, the function may cause an access violation.
  • 1
    Good catch on the bad cast. Unfortunately this "fix" is terrible (-1). In a Unicode build, which @Grant obviously has, this does exactly the same thing as the code in the question. – Ben Voigt Jun 22 '11 at 23:09
  • Fair enough. I guess it wasn't obvious to me that it was a unicode build, other than the cast itself which I was questioning. But then, that probably means I shouldn't be answering. – dolphy Jun 22 '11 at 23:19
  • It is bad idea to cast to (LPCTSTR). Because literal will be the same. Right way is to use _T() macros. – George Gaál Jun 22 '11 at 23:19
  • 2
    The docs you cited are also incredibly important, and caught a mistake I made initially. But again, a cast is not the solution. – Ben Voigt Jun 22 '11 at 23:22
  • 1
    Agreed. The only reason I haven't deleted the answer is so others can learn that exact distinction (as I just did). – dolphy Jun 22 '11 at 23:25

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