2

I have a multidimensionnal array which represent distances between two group of points (colored by blue and red respectively).

import numpy as np
distance=np.array([[30,18,51,55],
                   [35,15,50,49],
                   [36,17,40,32],
                   [40,29,29,17]])

Each column represent the red dot and rows are for blue dots. Values in this matrix represent the distance between red and blue dots. Here is a sketch to understand what it looks like:

enter image description here

Question: How to find the minimum of the sum of distances between mutually disjoint (blue, red) pairs?

Attempt

I am expecting to find 1=1, 2=2, 3=3 and 4=4 in the above image. However, if i use a simple argmin numpy function like:

for liste in distance:
    np.argmin(liste)

the result is

1
1
1
3

because the 2 red point is the nearest of 1,2 and 3 blue point.

Is there a way to do something generic in that case to make things better? I mean without using a lot of if statements and a while function.

5
  • Why is 1,1,1,3 not the expected output? And why it is not 2,1,4,3 if you process the distance for blue points 1,2,3,4 sequentially and remove the points found?
    – Bill Huang
    Commented Oct 22, 2020 at 13:16
  • 1
    @BillHuang I believe OP is asking for the correspondence that minimize the total pair-wise distance. Commented Oct 22, 2020 at 13:21
  • Because two points can't be at the same places. Here the 2 red point can't be assigned to 1, 2 and 3 blue point. I can't do it sequentially because the order of point could change and I want that each red point is assigned to it's nearest blue point.
    – Panda50
    Commented Oct 22, 2020 at 13:24
  • @Panda50 how do you want to deal with the case where two red points have the same blue point as their closest?
    – Ehsan
    Commented Oct 22, 2020 at 13:27
  • @Eshan let assume that red point number two is equally spaced from blue point 1 and 2. Red point 1 is nearest blue point 1 so blue point 1 can't be red point two! As Quang Hoang say, I'd like to know if there is a simple way to compute the minimal pair-wise distance!
    – Panda50
    Commented Oct 22, 2020 at 13:37

2 Answers 2

5

The problem is known as the assignment problem in operations management and can be solved efficiently by Hungarian Algorithm. In your case, the distance can be viewed as a kind of "cost" function which is going to be minimized in its total.

Luckily, scipy has a nice linear_sum_assignment() (see official docs and example) implemented, so you don't have to reinvent the wheel. The function returns the matched indices.

from scipy.optimize import linear_sum_assignment
distance=np.array([[30,18,51,55],
                   [35,15,50,49],
                   [36,17,40,32],
                   [40,29,29,17]])

row_ind, col_ind = linear_sum_assignment(distance)

# result
col_ind
Out[79]: array([0, 1, 2, 3])
row_ind
Out[80]: array([0, 1, 2, 3])
1
  • Thanks a lot for the solution Bill and thank for the documentation and the wiki pages!!!
    – Panda50
    Commented Oct 22, 2020 at 16:25
0

You can use itertools.permutations to find all possible solutions. Then, you calculate which solution minimize the total pair-wise distance.

import itertools
import numpy as np

distance=np.array([[30,18,51,55],[35,15,50,49],[36,17,40,32],[40,29,29,17]])

permutation=[x for x in itertools.permutations([0,1,2,3],4)]
x_opt=permutation[0]
d_opt=sum([distance[i,x_opt[i]] for i in range(len(distance[0]))])
for x in permutation:
    d=sum([distance[i,x[i]] for i in range(len(distance[0]))])
    if d<d_opt:
        (d_opt,x_opt)=(d,x)
print(x_opt)

The result will be in this case:

(0,1,2,3)
3
  • 1
    This is really massive overkill Commented Oct 22, 2020 at 14:19
  • Thanks Lauriane, it could work but it's a bit hard to write.
    – Panda50
    Commented Oct 22, 2020 at 16:21
  • Caution: How many possible solutions are there for n red points? There are n!, And 15! > 1.3 trillion.
    – Bill Huang
    Commented Oct 22, 2020 at 16:41

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