19

I am reading again "C++ Primer, 5th edition". In chapter 16 about templates, there is an example of "template Non-type parameters":

template<unsigned N, unsigned M>
int compare(const char (&p1)[N], const char (&p2)[M])
{
    return strcmp(p1, p2);
}

int main()
{

    cout << compare("hi", "mom") << endl;
    cout << strcmp("hi", "mom") << endl;


    std::cout << "\ndone!\n";
}
  • As we know, strcmp() compares two character strings and returns 0 for equality, a positive value if str1 is greater than str2, and a negative value if str1 is less than str2, and this is what I get inside main() calling strcmp().

  • The problem is in the book example that calls strcmp() inside the template function, so when I run the program I get:

output:

-5
-1

What is the problem in the code? And why are the two giving different values for the same arguments?

22

This is a compiler optimization applied when strcmp is passed literal parameters, even on -O0. See this compiler explorer link: https://godbolt.org/z/T4EKxr

#include <cstring>

template<unsigned N, unsigned M>
int compare(const char (&p1)[N], const char (&p2)[M])
{
    return strcmp(p1, p2);
}

int a() {
    return compare("hi", "mom");
}

int b() {
    return strcmp("hi", "mom");
}

The generated assembly:

.LC0:
        .string "mom"
.LC1:
        .string "hi"
a():
        push    rbp
        mov     rbp, rsp
        mov     esi, OFFSET FLAT:.LC0
        mov     edi, OFFSET FLAT:.LC1
        call    int compare<3u, 4u>(char const (&) [3u], char const (&) [4u])
        pop     rbp
        ret
b():
        push    rbp
        mov     rbp, rsp
        mov     eax, -1
        pop     rbp
        ret
int compare<3u, 4u>(char const (&) [3u], char const (&) [4u]):
        push    rbp
        mov     rbp, rsp
        sub     rsp, 16
        mov     QWORD PTR [rbp-8], rdi
        mov     QWORD PTR [rbp-16], rsi
        mov     rdx, QWORD PTR [rbp-16]
        mov     rax, QWORD PTR [rbp-8]
        mov     rsi, rdx
        mov     rdi, rax
        call    strcmp
        leave
        ret

As we can see, for b() above, gcc is optimizing the call to strcmp to just a -1, whereas it actually calls strcmp for a(). This is valid behavior, as strcmp returns:

Negative value if lhs appears before rhs in lexicographical order.

Zero if lhs and rhs compare equal.

Positive value if lhs appears after rhs in lexicographical order.

-1 is negative.

If we turn on optimizations, gcc will similarly optimize a().

| improve this answer | |
  • Really great! I do appreciate it. On my codeblocks I've turned on Optimization to [-o1] and made the target as Release and rebuilt and an and I get the same results: -1 -1 so it is a matter of compiler optimization. Thank you! – Maestro Oct 22 at 18:33
  • 2
    @Maestro - BTW this is an example of Liskov Substitution Principle (for functions) in application, as applied by the compiler: it can produce a different implementation that returns a different result, but one that's still within the spec - and if you've written your code correctly (i.e., you haven't relied on a particular value), it shouldn't cause any surprises/bugs. – Filip Milovanović Oct 23 at 6:09

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