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I'm building an index tree based on a bplus tree in Rust and have so far used a definition for parent nodes as:

struct Parent<T : std::fmt::Debug> {
    subtree_count : [usize; Arity],
    children      : [*mut ParentOrLeaf<T>; Arity],
    used          : usize, 
}

On my 64 bit computer with Arity=8 that works out to a total memory requirement of 136 bytes. I'm using std::alloc::Layout::new and std::alloc::alloc to allocate this structure. But I'm worried that being just slightly larger than a power of two (136 > 128) that the malloc library will end up allocating 256 bytes for this data structure instead of just 136. Since this is a container type, wasting half the memory allocated is unacceptable.

std::alloc::Layout::new::<Parent<T>>().align() reports a layout of 8 as expected.

How much memory will this structure actually take up when it is allocated?

If so much memory is wasted, I could change subtree_count : [usize; Arity] to subtree_count : [usize; Arity-1], which would make the total memory 128. Then redo all of the optimized logic of my library to handle the change. But before I do, I want to make sure that is actually necessary.

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  • I would assume that data alignment is enforced by default, so the padding of 136 bytes up to 256 is highly probable Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 19:45
  • Maybe as a workaround you could remove used field and rely on a corresponding value from subtree_count from parent? Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 19:48
  • This isn't a question of alignment, as that term is normally used. On a typical 64 bit machine the alignment of Parent is just 8, not 128. It's instead a question of how the allocator manages space.
    – trent
    Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 19:59
  • @AlexLarionov The nature of bplus index trees is that used is that used is necessary but that you could determine the last subtree_count using what the parent says the total subtree count for this vertex is.
    – DanielV
    Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 20:04
  • 1
    This will certainly depend on the allocator you use, but I doubt it will end up allocating a lot of excess memory. An allocated memory chunk will always contain some metadata in addition to your payload, e.g. the size of the chunk. I seem to remember that glibc will always allocate multiples of 8 bytes, so you wouldn't actually waste any memory with your data structure. Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 20:08

1 Answer 1

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If the size is 136 this means that a contiguous allocation of many structs in an array or a vector will use exactly 136 bytes for each struct.

When it comes to individually allocating some structs, the amount of wasted space only depends on the underlying malloc() strategy, but is not a property of the allocated type.

For example, a quick and dirty adaptation of your example on my stable-x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu platform gives this :

size 136
align 8
arr delta1 136
arr delta2 136
box delta1 144
box delta2 144

Of course there is no guaranty that the three allocated structs are near to each other, but in this specific case they are, and the wasted (not really wasted, but used by the allocator itself) space is 8 bytes.

struct ParentOrLeaf<T: std::fmt::Debug> {
    value: Option<T>,
}

const Arity: usize = 8;

struct Parent<T: std::fmt::Debug> {
    subtree_count: [usize; Arity],
    children: [*mut ParentOrLeaf<T>; Arity],
    used: usize,
}

fn main() {
    type P = Parent<i32>;
    let l = std::alloc::Layout::new::<P>();
    println!("size {}", l.size());
    println!("align {}", l.align());
    let ptr: *mut ParentOrLeaf<i32> = std::ptr::null_mut();
    let arr = [
        P {
            subtree_count: [0; Arity],
            children: [ptr; Arity],
            used: 0,
        },
        P {
            subtree_count: [0; Arity],
            children: [ptr; Arity],
            used: 0,
        },
        P {
            subtree_count: [0; Arity],
            children: [ptr; Arity],
            used: 0,
        },
    ];
    let a0 = &arr[0] as *const P as usize;
    let a1 = &arr[1] as *const P as usize;
    let a2 = &arr[2] as *const P as usize;
    println!("arr delta1 {}", a1 - a0);
    println!("arr delta2 {}", a2 - a1);
    let p0 = Box::new(P {
        subtree_count: [0; Arity],
        children: [ptr; Arity],
        used: 0,
    });
    let p1 = Box::new(P {
        subtree_count: [0; Arity],
        children: [ptr; Arity],
        used: 0,
    });
    let p2 = Box::new(P {
        subtree_count: [0; Arity],
        children: [ptr; Arity],
        used: 0,
    });
    let a0 = p0.as_ref() as *const P as usize;
    let a1 = p1.as_ref() as *const P as usize;
    let a2 = p2.as_ref() as *const P as usize;
    println!("box delta1 {}", a1 - a0);
    println!("box delta2 {}", a2 - a1);
}
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  • Hmm, so it seems it is consuming memory up to 144 bytes, so 8 bytes of wasted space so 6% of space wasted.
    – DanielV
    Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 20:13
  • 2
    The 8 bytes aren't "wasted" – they are metadata used by the allocator, and there is no way to avoid them. Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 20:14
  • @DanielV yes but, as stated before the code, only on this specific case and on my platform. there is no guaranty.
    – prog-fh
    Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 20:15
  • 1
    I mean, you could write your own allocator just for objects of this exact size, in which case you possibly could make do with less metadata, but when using a general-purpose allocator it's unlikely you will be able to do any better. Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 20:16
  • 1
    So I ran a version of this on my computer and got the same box results. And messing with the arity, it seems it is a +8 byte header , not rounding. This is good news, I don't have to change anything.
    – DanielV
    Commented Oct 23, 2020 at 21:07

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